Suggestions offered for Cobb schools
April 07, 2010 01:00 AM | 2171 views | 11 11 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
DEAR EDITOR:

The Cobb County School District should provide high school juniors and seniors on-line classes. Colleges and universities offer these virtual classes. On-line instruction is an accepted and successful form of education now. Therefore, the CCSD could save money by reducing infrastructure costs for providing traditional classes to juniors and seniors. These students are usually at least 16 years of age. Thus, they are mature enough to take on-line classes at home.

Additionally, the CCSD should solicit advertisers for the CCSD school buses. City transit systems reduce their expenditures each year by simply placing advertisements on their buses. I think the CCSD should follow this successful business model in order to resolve the current budget crisis. Hence, I believe the CCSD should consider a public corporation business model similar to that of the United States Postal Service and city transit systems.

Tyrone D. Scott
Smyrna
Comments
(11)
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hello?
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May 18, 2011
"the State of Georgia considers 16 year old children mature enough to consent to sex. It is the law. Certainly these same 16 year old children should have the option to take their classes on-line to save their school money."

The reason most 16 year olds aren't mature enough to take classes online (OR in a regular school setting) is because of the fact that they're out there consenting to sex. Anybody NOT see this connection?

Tyrone D. Scott
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June 16, 2010
My response to:

« CobbOak wrote on Monday, Jun 07 at 01:26 AM »

Each year thousands of students earn Associates, Bachelors, Masters, and Doctorate degrees on-line. Therefore, on-line education is a very acceptable and inexpensive alternative for learning. I wish money grew on trees and no one ever had to sacrifice anything. However, in these times of financial distress we all must usually give up something. The CCSD did close Oakwood High School and they opted for a digital academy for those students.

Again, I wish we had the money to keep all the schools open and never lay off any teachers. However, sometimes we must make difficult decisions that we do not like. Nonetheless, colleges and universities have established on-line education as suitable and economical means of providing a quality instruction.

CobbOak
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June 07, 2010
A computer is not a teacher.

Oakwood High School offers a blended learning environment.

Please help Oakwood High School continue to serve Cobb County Students!

Last Chance, unless you decide to sue because of their violation of due process:

6/9 CCSD Board Meeting

Public Comments - 7:30 AM sign in to speak

Board Meeting, comments - 8:30 AM

514 Glover St. Marietta, Georgia 30080

(Legal Adoption of the FY2011 Budget at Regular Board Meeting)
OnLine Parent
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April 11, 2010
My daughter has taken a couple of classes online during her high school years. It cost us approximately $275 per HALF credit. It's not cheap. It also requires that you have a computer with a system that is up to date enough to be compatible with the district's system. Students need to be motivated and responsible in order to participate and do well.

I think the idea is to be commended, but I don't think it is applicable to the average high school student.
Tyrone D. Scott
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April 11, 2010
The CCSD should offer the parents of students under 16 the option to administer on-line classes to their children at home. Again, this on-line alternative would decrease funding for maintaining and building conventional educational facilities. Moreover, this option would attract home schooled students and private school students back into the CCSD. Thus, the CCSD would receive more funding from the state for these new students. This additional revenue would help to resolve the CCSD budget crisis.
Tyrone D. Scott
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April 10, 2010
My response to:

“« anonymous wrote on Wednesday, Apr 07 at 11:07 AM »

The author needs to check his facts. The Cobb School System offers on-line classes already. Students do have to pay for them. So, he'd like for them to be offered for free. Oops! We loose money again! As for copying the business model of the post office, or public transit. Last, I looked they were all going broke. Try again!“

Please note that I advised that we follow the model of colleges and universities regarding offering on-line classes. These institutions offer virtual classes routinely and they are not losing money on them. Colleges and universities actually save money by offering virtual courses. The reason is they can offer classes anywhere in the world via the Internet. Certainly you can understand on-line courses simply cost less to offer than traditional courses since they do not require facilities that traditional classes must have. I alluded to the Postal Service and public transit to demonstrate it is acceptable for public institutions to solicit funding other than tax revenue. Just imagine if NASCAR and the NFL only relied on ticket sales for revenue. They do not do that because they know they would not be successful without soliciting sponsors for advertisements.

Tyrone D. Scott
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April 10, 2010
My response to:

"Online classes wrote on Wednesday, Apr 07 at 08:27 AM

the majority of students are not mature enough to take them online. FACT!"

The State of Georgia considers 16 year old children mature enough to consent to sex. It is the law. Certainly these same 16 year old children should have the option to take their classes on-line to save their school money.

to anonymous
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April 08, 2010
Cobb does offer online classes for tuition - outside the school day. Certain classes can also be taken online during the school day as part of a student's schedule, and funded as a face-to-face class would be - thus free to the student.

Students need to be motivated, independent learners in order to do well with online classes, but they are definitely a viable option for many students.
anonymous
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April 07, 2010
The author needs to check his facts. The Cobb School System offers on-line classes already. Students do have to pay for them. So, he'd like for them to be offered for free. Oops! We loose money again! As for copying the business model of the post office, or public transit. Last, I looked they were all going broke. Try again!
East Cobb Dad
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April 07, 2010
This is a good idea!
Online classes
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April 07, 2010
the majority of students are not mature enough to take them online. FACT!
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