US to provide South Sudan with $180M in food aid
by Julie Pace, AP White House Correspondent
August 12, 2014 10:00 AM | 671 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
In this photo of Thursday, July 24, 2014, children moving a bag of grain through the mud with a wheel burrow from a food distribution through the new United Nations' Malakal Camp for Internally Displaced People, (IDP) during the wet season which has made life for hundreds of thousands of IDPs in South Sudan very challenging, in Malakal, Sudan. Health experts are meeting in South Sudan’s capital, Juba, Monday July 28, 2014, debating exactly how severe the famine situation is in South Sudan, and their decision may prompt millions of dollars in aid or condemn tens of thousands of displaced people to continued hunger in what is described by Chris Hillbruner, the lead food security analyst for FEWSNET, a famine early warning system "is still the worst food security emergency in the world ... there is still huge need." (AP Photo/ Matthew Abbott)
In this photo of Thursday, July 24, 2014, children moving a bag of grain through the mud with a wheel burrow from a food distribution through the new United Nations' Malakal Camp for Internally Displaced People, (IDP) during the wet season which has made life for hundreds of thousands of IDPs in South Sudan very challenging, in Malakal, Sudan. Health experts are meeting in South Sudan’s capital, Juba, Monday July 28, 2014, debating exactly how severe the famine situation is in South Sudan, and their decision may prompt millions of dollars in aid or condemn tens of thousands of displaced people to continued hunger in what is described by Chris Hillbruner, the lead food security analyst for FEWSNET, a famine early warning system "is still the worst food security emergency in the world ... there is still huge need." (AP Photo/ Matthew Abbott)
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In this photo dated Thursday, July 24, 2014, People trudge along the main passageway through United Nations' Malakal Camp for Internally Displaced People, (IDP) during the wet season which has made life for hundreds of thousands of IDPs in South Sudan very challenging, in Malakal, Sudan. Health experts are meeting in South Sudan’s capital, Juba, Monday July 28, 2014, debating exactly how severe the famine situation is in South Sudan, and their decision may prompt millions of dollars in aid or condemn tens of thousands of displaced people to continued hunger in what is described by Chris Hillbruner, the lead food security analyst for FEWSNET, a famine early warning system "is still the worst food security emergency in the world ... there is still huge need." (AP Photo/ Matthew Abbott)
In this photo dated Thursday, July 24, 2014, People trudge along the main passageway through United Nations' Malakal Camp for Internally Displaced People, (IDP) during the wet season which has made life for hundreds of thousands of IDPs in South Sudan very challenging, in Malakal, Sudan. Health experts are meeting in South Sudan’s capital, Juba, Monday July 28, 2014, debating exactly how severe the famine situation is in South Sudan, and their decision may prompt millions of dollars in aid or condemn tens of thousands of displaced people to continued hunger in what is described by Chris Hillbruner, the lead food security analyst for FEWSNET, a famine early warning system "is still the worst food security emergency in the world ... there is still huge need." (AP Photo/ Matthew Abbott)
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EDGARTOWN, Mass. (AP) — The United States is providing $180 million in emergency aid to address a food crisis in South Sudan.

White House National Security Adviser Susan Rice says the people of South Sudan face the worst food shortage in the world. She blamed the suffering of the South Sudanese on their leaders' inability to put the people's interests ahead of their own.

The money for the food aid is coming from USAID, as well as a Department of Agriculture trust.

The White House says the U.S. has already provided South Sudan with more than $456 million in humanitarian aid, but more is needed because of the threat of famine.



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