Father-son pastors find calling in Cobb
by Emily Boorstein
August 04, 2014 04:00 AM | 4520 views | 2 2 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Mic Knox, left, with his father, Freddie Knox, at Harrison High School where Mic will lead Sunday worship services, held at 10 a.m., for Paradox Church. Freddie is also a pastor and said God told him before Mic was born he would be a pastor when he grew up. <br> Staff/Jeff Stanton
Mic Knox, left, with his father, Freddie Knox, at Harrison High School where Mic will lead Sunday worship services, held at 10 a.m., for Paradox Church. Freddie is also a pastor and said God told him before Mic was born he would be a pastor when he grew up.
Staff/Jeff Stanton
slideshow
MARIETTA — For a west Cobb father and son who are both pastors, the road to the ministry may not always be straight, but the calling from God to serve others is clear.

“Jesus says the most fulfilling life you can live is when you’re giving it away by serving and caring for others,” said Mic Knox, a businessman by trade who is finishing up seminary classes.

He started Paradox Church, a non-denominational congregation in his home in January, which is now meeting at 10 a.m. at his alma mater, Harrison High School on Due West Road in Kennesaw.

His dad, Freddie Knox, is the assistant pastor at Spirit Life Church of God, a Pentecostal church on Hill Road in Powder Springs.

Like his son, Freddie Knox was in a different field before he entered the ministry as an electrician, and he too started a church in Cobb — Lost Mountain Church of God on Dallas Highway in Marietta.

Freddie Knox said he knew his son would follow in his footsteps before he was even born.

While his wife was pregnant, Freddie Knox said “I had a dream that I would have a boy child and that God would call him to the ministry.”

He said he never told his son that, and when Mic Knox was contemplating a career change, he thought, “I don’t want to go into ministry. I saw my dad in ministry when I was a kid. You don’t make much money in ministry.”

But then he said he felt Jesus told him “You have to do it.”

When Mic Knox told his dad he wanted to go to seminary, Freddie Knox said he took him aback by responding, “Yes, son, I know that.”

Mic Knox said he’s been exposed to a wide range of faiths in his path to become a pastor. While he was raised Pentecostal in his father’s church, he’s taking courses from a Presbyterian seminary, was ordained in a Southern Baptist church and his wife was raised Methodist.

That exposure is what led him to form his own non-denominational church, and he said he strives to bridge the gap between traditional and contemporary Protestant services. He said his services include prayers of adoration and confession, a sermon, communion every Sunday and a wide range of music, including older hymns and newer praise songs.

He also said in his research he learned that 75 to 82 percent of the West Cobb community doesn’t attend church at all, even though “there’s a church on every corner.”

“That statistic is alarmingly high if you’re a pastor,” Mic Knox said.

By creating a new church, he hopes to reach people whose needs are not being met by the established churches in the community, which he said tends to skew older in terms of its congregants.

One person whose been at Paradox since the beginning is Tommy Thompson, a west Cobb veterinarian who has known the Knoxes for about 11 years.

Thompson said he’d been “going to churches before where the pastors would go on and on about the Bible and … it was just, ‘Yeah, I’ve heard that before and it’s a great, beautiful story.’ But Mic will bring it in to today’s life and will connect it in a really unique way.”

He described Mic and Freddie Kox as “the two most down-to-earth, laid back normal people that I’ve ever met.”

Freddie Knox says he knows what it means to be called to preach the gospel and is proud his son is “willing to invest his life in ministering to other people … when he could be doing other things.”

Mic Knox said his dad set an example for him when he was growing up by making his children a priority. His dad was his best man at his wedding, and both said they’re frequently calling or texting on the phone with one another.

Meanwhile, Mic Knox says his roots in Cobb are deep.

“I have actually had the luxury of traveling and spending a lot of time around the U.S.,” he said. “The cool thing is, I really liked where I was from.”



Comments
(2)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
anonymous
|
August 05, 2014
'God told him before Mic was born he would be a pastor when he grew up.' Wow, this man is totally amazing. God talks to him.
anonymous
|
August 05, 2014
If you look at all the corruption that is in churches and in many of the leaders, you would be me.....I don't trust any of them. How did YOU KNOW your son would follow you? Another example of hogwash.....how DID YOU KNOW THIS? You WANTED THIS, but HOW DID YOU KNOW THIS? Did God come down and reveal himself to you except for in a dream? This is the problem with organized religion. I could accept I PRAYED FOR MY SON TO GO INTO THE MINISTERY, BUT "Freddie Knox said he knew his son would follow in his footsteps before he was even born." That is kinda, well, not kinda, but pure and total speculation and hope on Freddie Knox's hopes. Nowhere in the Bible did it say Freddie Knox's son will follow in his footsteps," therefore Freddie Knox added his own verses to the word of God. And Freddie Knox putting himself in a special relationship with God in that God spoke directly to Him? Just another ............... God told my parents even before I was born that I will win the lottery. We are still waiting for the blessing.
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, and spam will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides