Two Ebola patients to fly into Dobbins
by Hilary Butschek
August 01, 2014 05:38 PM | 4992 views | 9 9 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend | print
This photo provided by Jeremy Writebol show his parents, David and Nancy Writebol, who are Christian missionaries in Liberia. Nancy Writebol is one of two Americans working for a missionary group in Liberia that have been diagnosed with Ebola. Plans are underway to bring back the two Americans from Africa for treatment. (AP Photo/Courtesy Jeremy Writebol)
This photo provided by Jeremy Writebol show his parents, David and Nancy Writebol, who are Christian missionaries in Liberia. Nancy Writebol is one of two Americans working for a missionary group in Liberia that have been diagnosed with Ebola. Plans are underway to bring back the two Americans from Africa for treatment. (AP Photo/Courtesy Jeremy Writebol)
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Dr. Kent Brantly is shown in this 2013 photo provided by JPS Health Network. A relief group official says Brantly is one of two American aid workers that have tested positive for the Ebola virus while working to combat an outbreak of the deadly disease at a hospital in Liberia. A spokesman said both Americans have been isolated and are under intensive treatment.(AP Photo/JPS Health Network)
Dr. Kent Brantly is shown in this 2013 photo provided by JPS Health Network. A relief group official says Brantly is one of two American aid workers that have tested positive for the Ebola virus while working to combat an outbreak of the deadly disease at a hospital in Liberia. A spokesman said both Americans have been isolated and are under intensive treatment.(AP Photo/JPS Health Network)
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In this undated photo released by the Center for Disease Control, a Aeromedical Biological Containment System which looks like a sealed isolation tent for Ebola air transportation is shown. On Thursday afternoon July 31, 2014, officials at Atlanta's Emory University Hospital said they expected one of the Americans to be transferred there "within the next several days." The hospital declined to identify which aid worker, citing privacy laws. (AP Photo/Center for Disease Control)
In this undated photo released by the Center for Disease Control, a Aeromedical Biological Containment System which looks like a sealed isolation tent for Ebola air transportation is shown. On Thursday afternoon July 31, 2014, officials at Atlanta's Emory University Hospital said they expected one of the Americans to be transferred there "within the next several days." The hospital declined to identify which aid worker, citing privacy laws. (AP Photo/Center for Disease Control)
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MARIETTA — Two Americans who were infected with the Ebola virus while in west Africa will be flown into Dobbins Air Reserve Base in the next few days.

The patients will stop in Marietta on their way to be treated at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta.

County commissioner and Delta pilot Bob Ott said there’s no need to worry about the safety of allowing the plane to land in Cobb while carrying infected passengers.

“This is a unique situation, and so it’s a specially-trained crew on the plane — it’s called a Medevac,” Ott said. “There will be an isolation unit taken over to Africa, and the patients loaded into that unit and put on the plane, and then it will land and they will presumably take that unit to Emory.”

Ott said the pilots will not have to receive special training to carry the Ebola patients because there will be doctors and nurses onboard to take care of the unit. He added he would have no problem with flying a plane carrying patients infected with Ebola.

“I give all the medical (team) and pilot personal credit for doing that because they could potentially save those people’s lives by getting them over here for better treatment,” Ott said.

The Pentagon’s press secretary, Rear Adm. John Kirby, said Department of Defense personnel who will operate the plane will not have any contact with the patients.

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued guidance on the safe transport and care of patients with infectious diseases,” Kirby said. “The patients will be escorted throughout by specially and frequently trained teams that have sufficient resources to transport the patients so that there is no break in their medical care or exposure to others.”

The two people infected with the virus are Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol. They worked for U.S. missionary groups and are in serious condition in Liberia, according to the North Carolina-based charity Samaritan’s Purse, which is paying for their evacuation and medical care.

The two will be flown separately on a private charter aircraft with the help of the State Department and the DOD. The first flight will land at Dobbins on Monday, said doctors at Emory hospital, and the second will arrive later next week.

The aircraft is a Gulfstream jet fitted with a collapsible clear tent designed to house a single patient and stop any infectious germs from escaping. It was built to transfer CDC employees exposed to contagious diseases.

It will be the first time anyone infected with the disease is brought into the country. Ebola is not spread in the air, but only through direct contact with blood or other bodily fluids from an infected person.

Tyler Pearson, spokesman for WellStar Health System, said even though WellStar’s hospitals have no expectation of seeing patients with Ebola, they are prepared.

“All of our (emergency room) personnel have infectious disease training,” Pearson said. “They actually just did re-training on Ebola recently, so they could be prepared on this.”

Pearson said each WellStar hospital has someone trained in treating infectious diseases who can direct treatment for the patient.

Brantly and Writebol will be taken to Emory after arriving in Marietta.

The Emory isolation unit has two beds, a hospital spokeswoman said. It opened 12 years ago and was designed to handle CDC workers if they became infected while working on an infectious germ.

There is no specific treatment for the disease, although Writebol has already received an experimental treatment from a team of Emory doctors who are already in Liberia, according to the mission groups.

“If there’s any modern therapy that can be done,” such as better monitoring of fluids, electrolytes and vital signs, workers will be able to do it better in this safe environment, said Dr. Philip Brachman, an Emory University public health specialist who for many years headed the CDC’s disease detectives program.

“That’s all we can do for such a patient. We can make them feel comfortable” and let the body try to beat back the virus, he said.

— The Associated Press contributed to this report.



Comments
(9)
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sunset47
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August 05, 2014
The pharma community along with the religious community should be responsible for the cost of treatment as they are using these bible thumpers to advance their religion to the ignorant, backward people while assisting big pharma in drug testing for profit under the cloak of a religion and humanitarian causes. Corporations along with the 1% and supposed "Born Again Christians run this country just look at the preachers, politicians and Supreme Court actions or lack thereof.
Obama wants this
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August 02, 2014
This crazy idea was approved and pushed by Obama. The purpose is to spread the virus and cause chaos which is what Obama is all about so he can divert out attention from the IRS and Benghazi and eventually put us under Marshall law. He then will hold office as long as he wants. Let's not let that happen, and let's keep out all the infected including the refugees and the Mexicans before it is too late. Please stop Obama and everyone vote in November.
Just Wait
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August 03, 2014
You not only drank the Koolaid, you drowned in it.
ldb47
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August 05, 2014
I surmise you are a typical tea bagger, not to bright, probably an avid FOX watcher and Russ listener.
PeeWeesBrother
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August 02, 2014
If these two loved Africa so much then why didn't they stay there to die from a disease that has a 95% mortality rate instead of putting us and our children in danger?
Taxpayers bill
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August 02, 2014
If you choose to leave the country, you should not expect the taxpayers to foot the bill when something happens. I would like to know how much this will cost us? Some of you may think that is cruel, but we are the country of bad decisions that 48% of us get to pay for.
Just Wait
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August 02, 2014
THE WORLD AS WE KNOW IT IS COMING TO AN END! DISEASE AND PESTILENCE WILL SPREAD ACROSS THE COUNTRY! OMG! Or nothing at all could happen.
SomewhereInCobb
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August 02, 2014
I would like to know how they are getting from Dobbins to Emory. Please tell me it is NOT by ground transport in our usual traffic!
larry suttles
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August 01, 2014
it is a danger to the us to bring a condition in when we know very little how to control it....it could be the end of our people. this same group released live germs not more then two weeks ago. someone has to stand at the door of common sense. any accident will release this problem to the public....I am old but my grandchildren are in danger. leave the people sick in the country where it started and work on the cure there.
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