Local students create ‘101 Objects of Cobb’ magazine
by Ellen Eldridge
June 09, 2014 04:00 AM | 2732 views | 1 1 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Daniel Cox, front, CEO and founder of the Marietta Museum of History, smiles after students from Cheatham Hill Elementary School’s fifth-grade Target gifted program presented their magazine, 101 Objects of Cobb, to Cox and the museum. With him are: John Donahoe, Winn Marzullo, Cora Cahill, Zoe Wagner, teacher Nancy Ernstes, Sasha Mohoruk, Cooper Braddy, J.R. Staunton, John Mark LaSalle, Caitlyn Primous and Madelyn LaPrade.<br>Staff/Ellen Eldridge
Daniel Cox, front, CEO and founder of the Marietta Museum of History, smiles after students from Cheatham Hill Elementary School’s fifth-grade Target gifted program presented their magazine, 101 Objects of Cobb, to Cox and the museum. With him are: John Donahoe, Winn Marzullo, Cora Cahill, Zoe Wagner, teacher Nancy Ernstes, Sasha Mohoruk, Cooper Braddy, J.R. Staunton, John Mark LaSalle, Caitlyn Primous and Madelyn LaPrade.
Staff/Ellen Eldridge
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MARIETTA — A class from Cheatham Hill Elementary can number the ways that make Cobb County unique.

Fifth-graders in the school’s gifted program reviewed Smithsonian magazine’s issue, “101 Objects that Made America,” and were inspired to create their own magazine about 101 objects that made Cobb.

“We were motivated by the Smithsonian article to dig into the history of Cobb,” teacher Nancy Ernstes said.

 It led to an intense search of objects that they felt made Cobb County home to them, she said. “The kids had to evaluate what an object that would represent Cobb would be,” Ernstes said.

Last Wednesday, several of the contributing students met at Marietta’s Museum of History to present a copy of their publication to the museum.  

Two of the students had met with Dan Cox, the founder and CEO for the Marietta Museum of History, for their research, Ernstes said, adding the students had the opportunity to work with a graphic designer for the cover.

“The cover of the magazine was a result of many individual ideas, which included making it look like an iPad with the time reading ‘1:01’ and a photograph of the students on the playground forming “101” with their bodies,” Ernstes said.

When students called to do a tour of the museum, Cox took an interest in the students’ project, Ernstes said.

“We had fun creating this project,” Ernstes said, describing a photo of the “Big Chicken” game from the 1960s one student found in his grandmother’s attic that was used as one of the artifacts. Another student photographed Home Depot paint sticks and manipulated the images to make the “H” for Home Depot.

Unique stories written after a presentation to the class from one of the Cheatham Hill families, about moving to the Still family farm in west Cobb County, Ernstes said. “This will be the eighth generation to live on this land,” she said.

Individual students recorded biographies and posted the recordings next to their photographs as QR codes, Ernstes said. “It really took on a life of its own,” she said, describing how the incorporation of technology and lessons about deadlines taught the kids.

Students in Ernstes’ class also expressed desire to help with MUST Ministries’ Summer Lunch Program, she said, helping decorate bags, bringing donation of chips and producing lunches.

“Just assembling everything takes forever, so they’ll have plenty of opportunity to help along the way,” Ernstes said.”

The Target gifted program includes grades one through five, but the teachers do different activities with different grade levels, Ernstes said.

“We have gifted standards that Cobb County has created that go from critical thinking to evaluative thinking,” she said.

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Patricia Grassi
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June 11, 2014
What an interesting project! It is inspirational to read about all the different aspects of planning and working together everyone did, as well as the students' desire to help with the MUST program. A great group...a great teacher!
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