Cobb voters head to the polls
by Hilary Butschek
May 20, 2014 06:06 PM | 2086 views | 0 0 comments | 25 25 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Brett Landry opens his ballot for the primary election Tuesday at Beautiful Savior Lutheran Church on Shallowford Road as his son David stands on his tip-toes to watch his daddy perform his civic duty.  Staff/Kelly J. Huff
Brett Landry opens his ballot for the primary election Tuesday at Beautiful Savior Lutheran Church on Shallowford Road as his son David stands on his tip-toes to watch his daddy perform his civic duty. Staff/Kelly J. Huff
slideshow
 Cathy Reynolds, Area Election Supervisor, and Lynn Wills poll manager at Beautiful Savior Lutheran Church on Shallowford Road, had a morning rush of voters for the primary election<br>Kelly J. Huff
Cathy Reynolds, Area Election Supervisor, and Lynn Wills poll manager at Beautiful Savior Lutheran Church on Shallowford Road, had a morning rush of voters for the primary election
Kelly J. Huff
slideshow
MARIETTA — The insides of many voting precincts in Cobb County were quiet today, but voters were vocal about who they came to support.

Most voters who spoke with the MDJ said they were more concerned about the state races than local ones.

As of about 3 p.m. Tuesday, the voting location at Nobis Works recorded 131 votes of the

1,729 people eligible in that precinct.

The voting precinct at The Beautiful Savior Lutheran Church off Shallowford Road recorded 350 votes out of the 3,085 registered for that precinct.

Marietta attorney Bert Reeves, who is challenging state Rep. Charles Gregory (R-Kennesaw), voted with his girlfriend, Amy Owens, at Nobis Works today.

“I voted for myself today,” Reeves said.

Reeves said Tuesday afternoon his supporters were hard at work, and he had plans to wave signs later in the day.

“We are just running to the finish line at 7 o’clock,” he said.

The state races were at the forefront of many voters’ minds on primary election day.

Marsh and Julia Freemyer, east Cobb retirees, said they thought the U.S. Senate race was important because of recent issues surrounding the Affordable Care Act, but did not want to specify who they voted for.

“It’s important to exercise our responsibility,” Marsh Freemyer said.

Burl McCosh, a Marietta resident who works in nuclear power, said the Senate race was most important to him because he is trying to vote out the incumbents at the state level.

“I think we need to change some things in terms of our career politicians,” McCosh said.

Jeff Horne, an accountant in Marietta, said he voted for U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston because of “the general policies that he has and the conservative nature.”

Gaye Tiffany, a retired Marietta resident, said she based her vote for Commissioner JoAnn Birrell on her political and religious views.

“I’m a strong Republican and a strong Christian,” Tiffany said. “I’m just really against big government.”

Mandy Gann, a senior claims agent at QBE insurance and resident of Marietta, said she voted on the Democratic ticket in the primary so almost all of the candidates were unopposed.

“Honestly, the minimum wage question was one of the main things I was concerned about — it being raised,” Gann said.

Another voter said he focused on the state school superintendent race when preparing to vote. Charles Westrip, a veteran of the U.S. Army who lives in Marietta, said he voted for Mary Kay Bacallao.

“I’m more conservative,” Westrip said, “not so much into the Common Core.”

Scott Templeton of east Cobb, who works in real estate, said he thinks all of the races are equally important.

He said voting was a family effort. The night before the primary, his family had a conversation about what values were important to them and who would best represent those values in office.

“We just sat and we talked about what was important and what we’ve been hearing in the news, kind of who expresses our values. It’s not really a popularity vote for us. It’s what we believe in at home and what we think we’re going to get out of the candidates in office,” Templeton said.

Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, and spam will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides