The Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History displays never-before-seen artifacts
by Rachel Gray
May 11, 2014 04:00 AM | 2855 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History has opened a special 1864 exhibit with items loaned from private collections not seen by the public at the museum before, including letters, a snare drum, drumsticks and a sling. <br> Special to the MDJ
The Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History has opened a special 1864 exhibit with items loaned from private collections not seen by the public at the museum before, including letters, a snare drum, drumsticks and a sling.
Special to the MDJ
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KENNESAW — The Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History has opened a special 1864 exhibit with items loaned from private collections not seen by the public at the museum before.

In the collection are letters written by George Hudson of the 36th Georgia regiment out of Decatur, said the museum’s curator, Jonathan Scott.

“He wrote letters home all the time,” Scott said. “He was a very well-written guy.”

The letters to his wife and family reveal his fear of dying, missing home and “common sense issues,” such as how much money the army owes his wife if he were to die, Scott said.

“We wanted to talk about the hardships and how hard the war was for both sides,” Scott said. “It really wasn’t a pleasant time for anyone to be alive.”

The focus of the Southern Museum’s temporary exhibit is to tell a particular story of who owned and used an item, Scott said, such as a snare drum, drumsticks and a sling used by Jesse Thornburgh of the 39th Iowa regiment, who is also pictured in a period photograph at age 24.

On the battlefield, Scott said the drum was used to keep the pace for the marching soldiers. It also served as a modern-day radio to give commands to cease fire, retreat or charge.

“The drummer is actually extremely important in that they get those commands to the army at large,” Scott said.

The museum, 2829 Cherokee St., is open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays.

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