'Crown jewel': John Wieland Homes by the Square to go on sale May 22
by Nikki Wiley
May 06, 2014 04:00 AM | 7752 views | 0 0 comments | 26 26 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Jeff Kingsfield, Atlanta division president of John Wieland Homes, stands in one of the bedrooms in a model home under construction at the former government housing site known as Clay Homes off Roswell Street, about two blocks east of the Marietta Square. New residents who choose to buy the homes will have an upstairs view of downtown’s government buildings.<br>Staff/Jeff Stanton
Jeff Kingsfield, Atlanta division president of John Wieland Homes, stands in one of the bedrooms in a model home under construction at the former government housing site known as Clay Homes off Roswell Street, about two blocks east of the Marietta Square. New residents who choose to buy the homes will have an upstairs view of downtown’s government buildings.
Staff/Jeff Stanton
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MARIETTA — More than 100 upscale homes next to the Marietta Square will hit the market later this month in a neighborhood the developer calls the “crown jewel of Marietta.”

Located off Roswell Street by the Square’s southeastern border, the 108 proposed homes in the Meeting Park neighborhood will be evenly split between single-family and townhomes.

The townhomes will range from the $300,000s to the $600,000s. The single-family homes will range from the $400,000s to the $700,000s.

Under construction now by Smyrna-based John Wieland Homes and Neighborhoods, 18 townhomes are already completed. The neighborhood’s model home is under construction. Homes are scheduled to go on sale May 22, and Jeff Kingsfield, the company’s Atlanta division president, expects sales to take place over the next two years with the development fully completed in three years.

Meeting Park will contain two- and three-story single-family homes and three- and four-story townhomes.

Single-family homes will range from 2,500 square feet to 3,500.

Townhomes will range from 2,200 square feet to 3,400 square feet.

The homes will be built on lots that are 50 feet by 150 feet in size.

Elevators are an option for all three-story single-family homes. A swimming pool, entertaining pavilion, gardens and pocket parks will also be built.

The neighborhood signifies a new trend in suburban living, Kingsfield said.

Homeowners are trading their spacious yards for smaller lots and more amenities in the name of convenience, he said. Less acreage eliminates time spent mowing lawns and maintaining swimming pools and gives families more time to spend together.

“They don’t have time to manage 2 acres,” Kingsfield said.

More urban-style homes are finding their way to the suburbs, Kingsfield said, as homeowners look for neighborhoods close to restaurants, shopping and entertainment. Meeting Park, he believes, fits the bill, being just steps from the Square.

“It’s just being in a neighborhood that feels alive,” Kingsfield said.

John Wieland Homes and Neighborhoods purchased the 12-acre site in December from Cobb-based Walton Communities, who had previously bought it from Atlanta-based Winter Properties. Eighteen townhomes stood on the site and were about 90 percent completed, Kingsfield said. Those homes have been remodeled.

Original plans for the community called for all townhomes and condominiums, but that plan was revised to eliminate condos and introduce single-family homes, Kingsfield said.

But the switch wasn’t easy. Electrical, sewer and water lines had to be moved and plans had to be redrawn.

“Remodeling a home is different,” Kingsfield said. “It’s easier to build new. Well, we’re remodeling a whole neighborhood.”

A federally subsidized government housing complex, called Clay Homes, once stood on the site where Meeting Park sits now.

Mayor Steve Tumlin said the new community will give a boost to the Square and attract new development.

“I think it will make both the Square more viable and it will also attract more businesses away from the Square,” Tumlin said.

Homeowners in Meeting Park will likely dine and shop on the Square. New retailers may also be attracted to the area, Tumlin said, after the influx of new residents.

“You’ll see some nice restaurants go in, and some retail shops,” Tumlin said, adding new businesses would complement the Square, not detract from it.

He also hopes the neighborhood inspires more developers to construct new homes in Marietta.

“It’s going to be a domino effect,” Tumlin said. “As that area matures, I think you’re also going to see the Manget area come up.”

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