Pothole posse: Cobb, Marietta have crews working to repair damage from winter storms
by Nikki Wiley
February 28, 2014 04:00 AM | 1895 views | 0 0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Cobb County Department of Transportation Heavy Equipment Operators #2 Billy Painter and Mike Jones and Crew Leader Danny Farist work hot asphalt into a crater on North Dixie Avenue on Wednesday as they complete  repairs of a fourth stretch of road. The recent ice and snow increased the number of potholes around the county this winter.<br>Kelly J. Huff
Cobb County Department of Transportation Heavy Equipment Operators #2 Billy Painter and Mike Jones and Crew Leader Danny Farist work hot asphalt into a crater on North Dixie Avenue on Wednesday as they complete repairs of a fourth stretch of road. The recent ice and snow increased the number of potholes around the county this winter.
Kelly J. Huff
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MARIETTA — Road crews across the county are working to repair potholes formed during the two winter storms that rolled through Cobb over the last month.

Cobb has received almost 60 requests since the ice storm that hit the county earlier this month, said Bill Shelton, road maintenance division manager for Cobb Department of Transportation.

Three crews have been dispatched each day since the storm to repair those cracks and crevices, Shelton said, and they are able to fix between 15 and 20 potholes a day.

On average, it costs the county $50 in materials and $75 in labor to fill a pothole, county spokesman Robert Quigley said.

The city of Marietta has also had more than the normal volume of requests.

“We always receive more requests for potholes after ice storms,” said Dan Conn, director of public works for Marietta.

Winter is typically pothole season, Shelton said, but even with the icy weather, the county has fewer potholes than it did at this time last year.

Cobb repaired 1,300 potholes during fiscal 2013, which began in October 2012 and lasted through October 2013. About 500 have been repaired so far during this fiscal year beginning in October 2013.

Cold weather is particularly troublesome for road maintenance.

Shelton said potholes are caused when water gets under the asphalt, freezes and expands the road, and then thaws, leaving a crater in the road as cars drive over it.

“The more they run over it, the bigger it gets,” Shelton said.

Shelton pointed to the county’s special purpose local option sales tax for putting his department in a position to tackle potholes.

More than 280 miles of roads, comprising about $56 million, have been resurfaced under the 2011 SPLOST and there’s still a year to go, Shelton said.

“It has reduced our maintenance tremendously,” Shelton said.

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