City's law on Confederate street names questioned
January 14, 2014 04:30 PM | 426 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
This April 23, 2003 file photo shows a statue of a Confederate soldier at an intersection in Alexandria, Va. A city steeped in Civil War history is looking to modernize its laws by removing a provision that requires new north-south streets to be named for Confederate generals. The councilman sponsoring the law says it part of a broad effort to remove anachronistic code provisions that also outlaw lewd cohabitation and heavily regulate the bygone fad of "rebound tumbling." (AP Photo/Linda Spillers, File)
This April 23, 2003 file photo shows a statue of a Confederate soldier at an intersection in Alexandria, Va. A city steeped in Civil War history is looking to modernize its laws by removing a provision that requires new north-south streets to be named for Confederate generals. The councilman sponsoring the law says it part of a broad effort to remove anachronistic code provisions that also outlaw lewd cohabitation and heavily regulate the bygone fad of "rebound tumbling." (AP Photo/Linda Spillers, File)
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ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) — Steeped in Civil War history, the northern Virginia city of Alexandria is considering repeal of an old law requiring certain new streets to be named for Confederate generals.

City Councilman Justin Wilson is introducing legislation at Tuesday's council meeting to do away with a 1963 law requiring, whenever possible, that any new North-South streets built in city limits be named after Confederate military leaders.

Wilson's bill also would eliminate a requirement that new east-west streets be named for persons or places prominent in American history.

Wilson said he has not yet heard of any opposition to his bill.

Alexandria is across the Potomac River from the nation's capital.

Wilson said he is trying to overhaul a series of anachronistic laws, and that the other provisions are unrelated to Confederate history.



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