Showers again dampen events on the square
by Rachel Miller
September 22, 2013 12:40 AM | 3206 views | 1 1 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print

The 22nd annual Marietta StreetFest was a washout Saturday, with heavy rains causing most vendors to pack up and head home. Warner Robins resident Kris Robson, owner of Geoware Pottery, packs up his merchandise.<br>Staff/Todd Hull
The 22nd annual Marietta StreetFest was a washout Saturday, with heavy rains causing most vendors to pack up and head home. Warner Robins resident Kris Robson, owner of Geoware Pottery, packs up his merchandise.
Staff/Todd Hull
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Festivities were washed out Saturday at the 22nd Marietta StreetFest around Glover Park.

The arts, crafts and antiques market started in the morning and was supposed to last until 5 p.m., but by noon the number of booths were sparse and outnumbered the shoppers venturing out in the constant drizzle.

Waiting out the storm under a small white tent was the Long family from Fruithurst, Ala.

Randy Long, with the help of his family, harvests wood from the northeast hills of Alabama and saws it into lumber to be crafted into family heirlooms, such as hope chests and jewelry boxes.

Long said he has been crafting the pieces from cedar, sweet gum, hickory and poplar since 1978.

In just one day, Long said he can make two large chests that are more than two feet long, a foot and a half wide and two feet deep.

“I have built 10,000, so it gets easier,” Long said.

Long said he had not been to a craft show in Marietta for 10 years, and was supposed to be in the Square for a market on the Fourth of July.

Despite being nearly rained out again, the Longs ended the day with some sales and piqued interest in their boxes.

Chris and Fi Ward of Nashville were visiting friends in Marietta and purchased three chests to be given as gifts to friends.

“One is for us though,” said Fi Ward, who added the items were a great find because they are unique, smell good and can store even more treasures inside.

Across Glover Park, the Hubcaps and History Classic Car Show was having even less success with only a few cars on display, most with signs listing facts about the antique vehicles.

The one in front of a plum-colored 1927 Pierce Arrow stated that the 70 horsepower car originally cost $2,995.

It had been restored to its original color and interior by owners John and Eloise Haulbrook of Smyrna.

Next to it was a 1969 red Mustang that was being packed up by owner Gene Lucas of Smyrna.

Lucas said he purchased his “dream car” in May, which is the fifth muscle car he has owned. Some of the collection has been sold over the years.

Lucas, who has participated in car shows for 35 years, said his enthusiasm for collecting classic cars started when he was 12 years old.

“They are fun to drive, great to look at and part of history,” Lucas said.

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MAY-RETTA SURVIVOR
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September 22, 2013
Why not hold it insude S.O.S. aka Scarlett on the Square? There's never anybody in the place anyway.
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