Prosecutors can remain on Bales case
by Gene Johnson, Associated Press
August 14, 2013 02:30 PM | 400 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
In this Aug. 23, 2011 file Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System photo, Staff Sgt. Robert Bales participates in an exercise at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif. Lawyers for Bales, who was convicted of killing 16 Afghan civilians during nighttime raids last year, on Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013 asked a judge to remove the prosecution team from the case before his sentencing next week, after at least one prosecutor read compelled statements the soldier gave to Army doctors. (AP Photo/DVIDS, Spc. Ryan Hallock, File)
In this Aug. 23, 2011 file Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System photo, Staff Sgt. Robert Bales participates in an exercise at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif. Lawyers for Bales, who was convicted of killing 16 Afghan civilians during nighttime raids last year, on Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2013 asked a judge to remove the prosecution team from the case before his sentencing next week, after at least one prosecutor read compelled statements the soldier gave to Army doctors. (AP Photo/DVIDS, Spc. Ryan Hallock, File)
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SEATTLE (AP) — A military judge says a team of Army prosecutors can remain on the case of Staff Sgt. Robert Bales for his sentencing next week, even after they read documents they weren't supposed to.

Bales pleaded guilty to killing 16 Afghan civilians during nighttime raids last year.

His lawyers asked the judge on Tuesday to dismiss the prosecutors. Defense attorney John Henry Browne told The Associated Press that Nance sent a brief email Wednesday denying their motion.

Last month, the judge accidentally sent the prosecutors compelled statements Bales made to Army psychiatrists — and they read it, even though Bales' lawyers said they should have known better.

The statements were protected by Bales' Fifth Amendment rights and can't be used against him.

Bales faces life in prison with the possibility of parole, or without it.



Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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