Walker School student recalled as inspiration to others
by Nikki Wiley
July 16, 2013 12:01 AM | 4354 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Scott Shockley at age 17, center, is surrounded by his senior teammates, from left, Josh Lammert, Dixon Babb, Steven Wilson, Garrett Johnson and coach Ben Williamson at The Walker School. Shockley, 19, died Friday after a long battle with osteosarcoma.
Scott Shockley at age 17, center, is surrounded by his senior teammates, from left, Josh Lammert, Dixon Babb, Steven Wilson, Garrett Johnson and coach Ben Williamson at The Walker School. Shockley, 19, died Friday after a long battle with osteosarcoma.
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MARIETTA — Friends of a teenager who lost his battle with osteosarcoma are remembering him as a courageous athlete who hoped his life would inspire others.

Scott Shockley, 19, died Friday. He lettered in baseball, football and basketball at The Walker School and was a nationally ranked long snapper in football. He was a manager for the baseball team at Auburn University during his freshman year and a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity.

Michael Brady, varsity baseball coach at Walker, remembers Shockley for his athleticism but even more so for his sportsmanship and outgoing, giving personality. “Scott was an unbelievable athlete,” he said. “For what he did on the athletic field or court, he was an unbelievable person and student.”

Shockley was crowned Homecoming King and named Pitcher of the Year at Walker. He was also the inspiration for the “Walker Wolverines for Scott” foundation that benefits Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.

Brady called him a “coach’s dream,” saying he approached sports with a team attitude and recognized the game wasn’t about him.

After his diagnosis of osteosarcoma, a kind of bone cancer that affects mainly teens, Brady said he was determined to get back on the field.

“He said, ‘Coach Brady, I’m going to make it back. I’m going to pitch for you next year,’” Brady said. “That told me where his heart was. He really loved what we were doing.”

That happened his last year at Walker when he pitched during the senior night baseball game.

“He threw the first pitch of the game,” Brady said. “He was so appreciative to be able to fill his dream to be able to get out there. It was awesome.”

Jerry Loyd, a friend of Shockley’s family, said he never gave up battling his illness. “If something occurred and the doctor found something, he said, ‘OK. What do we do to fix it?’” Loyd said, calling him fearless.

Brady maintains that he will continue to touch lives and remembered the inspiration he provided to another cancer patient who sat next to Shockley in the hospital questioning why she was stricken with cancer.

“He said, ‘You know, God gave you this cancer. Now it’s time for you to do something to honor him,’” Brady said. It’s that spirit, he said, that lives on.

“When you saw him in the hallway, when you saw him in the baseball field, whenever you saw him, he was unbelievable,” Brady said. “His smile, which was infectious, it just showed the love he had.”

Family will receive friends from 6 to 8 p.m. tonight at HM Patterson and Son Canton Hill Chapel, 1157 Canton Road, Marietta. A celebration of life service will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at Johnson Ferry Baptist Church, 955 Johnson Ferry Road, Marietta. Family declined to comment.

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