Zimmerman trial is this year’s — Duke Lacrosse case
by Ann Coulter
Columnist
July 11, 2013 11:20 PM | 1010 views | 1 1 comments | 34 34 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Ann Coulter
Ann Coulter
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This week, instead of attacking a Hispanic senator, Marco Rubio, I will defend a Hispanic citizen, George Zimmerman, on trial for the murder of Trayvon Martin. (Zimmerman would make a better senator.)

It’s becoming painfully obvious why no charges were brought against Zimmerman in this case — until Al Sharpton got involved. All the eyewitness accounts, testimony, ballistics and forensics keep backing up Zimmerman. We should send a big, fat bill for the whole thing to Sharpton, courtesy of MSNBC.

With the prosecution’s witnesses making the defense’s case, the inquisitors’ last stand is to claim that, if the races were reversed, the black guy would have been instantly charged with murder. As explained in The New York Times:

“Had Mr. Martin shot and killed Mr. Zimmerman under similar circumstances, black leaders say, the case would have barreled down a different path: Mr. Martin would have been quickly arrested by the Sanford Police Department and charged in the killing, without the benefit of the doubt.” (Also, CNN could have dropped the “white” and referred to Zimmerman exclusively as “Hispanic.”)

The people who say this are counting on the rest of us being too polite to mention that it is nearly impossible to imagine such a case in a world where half of all murders and a majority of robberies are committed by blacks. To reverse the races with the same set of facts, first, we’re going to need a gated, mixed-race community, similar to the Retreat at Twin Lakes, that has recently experienced a rash of robberies by white guys. The only way to do that is to enter “The Twilight Zone.”

There were at least eight burglaries in the 14 months before Zimmerman’s encounter with Martin. Numerous media accounts admit that “most” of these were committed by black males. I’m waiting to hear about a single crime at Twin Lakes that was not committed by a black male.

Just six months before Zimmerman’s encounter with Martin, two men had broken into the home of a neighbor, Olivia Bertalan, while she was alone with her infant son. She had just enough time to call 911 before running upstairs and locking herself in a room. The burglars knew she was home, but proceeded to rob the place anyway, even trying to enter the locked room where she held her crying child.

Bertalan had seen the burglars just before they broke into her house — one at the front door and one at the back. They were young black males. They lived in the Retreat by Twin Lakes.

In another case, a black teenager strode up to Zimmerman’s house and, in broad daylight, stole a bicycle off the front porch. The bike was never recovered.

Weeks before Zimmerman saw Martin, he witnessed another young black male peering into the window of a neighbor’s house. He called the cops, but by the time they arrived, the suspect was gone.

A few days later, another house was burglarized. The thieves made off with jewelry and a new laptop. Roofers working across the street had seen two black teenagers near the house at the time of the robbery. When they spotted one of the teens the next day, they called the police.

This time, the roofers followed the suspect so he wouldn’t get away. The cops arrived and found the stolen laptop in his backpack. This was the same black teenager Zimmerman had seen looking in a neighbor’s window.

The only reason it’s hard to imagine the Zimmerman case with the races reversed is that it’s hard to imagine a white teenager living in a mixed-race, middle-class community, mugging a black homeowner. This is not a problem of society’s reactions, but of the facts.

There is, however, at least one case of a black homeowner fatally shooting a white troublemaker. He was not charged with murder.

In 2006, the ironically named John White was sound asleep at his nice Long Island home when his teenage son woke him to say there was a mob of white kids shouting epithets in front of the house. The family was in no imminent danger. They could have called 911 and remained safely behind locked doors.

But White grabbed a loaded Beretta and headed out to the end of the driveway to confront the mob. A scuffle ensued and White ended up shooting one of the kids in the face, killing him.

White was charged and convicted only of illegal weapons possession — this was New York, after all — and involuntary manslaughter. He was sentenced to 20 months-to-four years in prison, but after serving five months was pardoned by Gov. David Paterson.

With all due compassion for the kid who was killed, the public was overwhelmingly on the father’s side — a fact still evident in Internet postings about the case. The kids were punks menacing a law-abiding homeowner. Even the prosecutor complained only that Paterson hadn’t called the victim’s family first. The local NAACP had campaigned aggressively on White’s behalf. There were no threats to riot in case of an acquittal.

The centerpiece of White’s self-defense argument was his recollection of his grandfather’s stories about the Ku Klux Klan. George Zimmerman’s memory of young black males committing crimes at Twin Lakes is somewhat more recent.

John White wasn’t jumped, knocked to the ground, repeatedly punched, and his skull knocked against the ground. He wasn’t even touched, though he claimed the white teen was lunging at him. Talk about no reason to “follow,” there was no reason for him to leave the safety of his locked home. White’s son knew the kids by name. They could have waited for the cops.

So, yes, this case probably would be very different if Zimmerman and Martin’s races were reversed. It is only when the victim is black that we must have a show trial, a million-dollar reward paid to the victim’s parents and the threat of riots.

Ann Coulter is legal affairs

correspondent for Human Events.
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kafantaris
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July 12, 2013
Let’s accept Zimmerman’s version that Martin was a troublemaker, that he was up to no good when he spotted him, that Martin got into fights, that he had marijuana in his system, and that he was a 6.2 aggressive teen -- not a twelve year old helpless boy.

This still leaves us with the burden of explaining those heart retching screams -- loud enough to be captured on the neighbor’s 911 call.

Zimmerman said elsewhere that the screams are from him because he was being pummeled by the unexpectedly aggressive Martin. The jury certainly has sufficient evidence of Martin’s aggressiveness, even though Zimmerman did not testify or give us an opportunity to probe further.

Yet, this being the case that we have, we ought to look further at what is reasonable -- how likely is that things happened the way Zimmerman says they did?

Is it likely for a man to cry for help when he is on the ground with someone sitting on him and punching repeatedly? Might he be too busy dealing with this to have an opportunity to cry for help -- in that way that we hear it on the 911 call? Yet, he could have done just that afterwards, or in between bouts.

The 911 recording we have, however, only captures the tail end of the fight. What we hear are not the ordinary screams of a man getting punched, pummeled or pounded. Rather, they are the pleas for help by someone who is not only in grave danger, but a danger that he knows and appreciates. Indeed, the cries are of such desperation that they pierce the coldest of hearts.

Zimmerman says that it was he who was screaming and we want to believe him. We should give him the benefit of all reasonable doubt because our system of justice prefers that ten guilty men go free rather than one innocent be found guilty. Moreover, Zimmerman’s version is plausible if Martin was prying the gun away from him. Indeed, let’s assume that Martin had grabbed the gun and was about to shoot Zimmerman. Does this fit with what we hear on the recorded 911 call?

Does it fit with the lack of any physical evidence of Martin’s DNA on Zimmerman’s gun? There should have been some, even if Martin had just touched it, let alone grabbed it, or struggled for it. Indeed, we might expect that a struggle for control would have left a heavier DNA imprint. Yet, it left none.

Still, let’s disregard this lack of Martin’s physical evidence on the gun and again give Zimmerman, the benefit of reasonable doubt -- the kind we give to our most important affairs.

Is there anything else that get’s in the way with Zimmerman’s version of what happened?

What about silence, the dead silence that we hear after the shot? Does it tell us anything? If Zimmerman was the one crying for help that eerie silence is odd. We might expect the cries to be interrupted by the struggle of the fight, or for the gun. Yet, they are steady and relentless all the way to the end when the shot is heard. Such a steady tempo does not indicate a struggle or a pounding on the pavement.

Those repeating howls are more from someone who is being held at gun point; someone who has felt the hard steel of a gun in his side; someone who is told in no uncertain terms that he is about to die -- and believes it.

If this is how things happened, then the person who fired the gun had a depraved heart because he heard the pleas for mercy by another human being but ignored them. A conviction for murder is thus in order.

And we can arrive at this conclusion by giving Zimmerman all the benefit of the doubt -- except what is not supported by the physical evidence and by common sense.
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