Re-enactment of Kennesaw Civil War battle marks 149th anniversary
by Rachel Miller
June 29, 2013 11:42 PM | 4362 views | 12 12 comments | 55 55 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The rumble of guns could be heard once again Saturday at the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield as Confederate States of America soldiers unloaded a volley of fire to honor the 149th anniversary of the Civil War Battle of Kennesaw Mountain.
The rumble of guns could be heard once again Saturday at the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield as Confederate States of America soldiers unloaded a volley of fire to honor the 149th anniversary of the Civil War Battle of Kennesaw Mountain.
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Kim Cole, a Marietta Middle School Teacher most of the year, extends her classroom to the public Saturday at Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield as she and fellow educator, Mandy Maddox of Chattanooga, demonstrate the old-fashioned way of dyeing cloth with plants to Paul O'Brien and his son Riley, 7, of Tucker.
Kim Cole, a Marietta Middle School Teacher most of the year, extends her classroom to the public Saturday at Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield as she and fellow educator, Mandy Maddox of Chattanooga, demonstrate the old-fashioned way of dyeing cloth with plants to Paul O'Brien and his son Riley, 7, of Tucker.
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A Confederate States of America encampment tent frames the soldiers on the battlefield Saturday as they prepare to fire their cannons.
A Confederate States of America encampment tent frames the soldiers on the battlefield Saturday as they prepare to fire their cannons.
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The 21st Ohio Infantry Regiment commander Josh Haugh of Summerville, S.C. addresses visitors to the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield on Saturday, as he explains what life was like for a Union soldier in the Civil War. The event was to observe the 149th anniversary of the Civil War Battle of Kennesaw Mountain.
The 21st Ohio Infantry Regiment commander Josh Haugh of Summerville, S.C. addresses visitors to the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield on Saturday, as he explains what life was like for a Union soldier in the Civil War. The event was to observe the 149th anniversary of the Civil War Battle of Kennesaw Mountain.
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After a field demonstration of cannon power, re-enactors Dave Meyers and Dave Pashko field questions from visitors while  observing the 149th anniversary of the Civil War Battle for Kennesaw Mountain at the  National Battle field.
After a field demonstration of cannon power, re-enactors Dave Meyers and Dave Pashko field questions from visitors while observing the 149th anniversary of the Civil War Battle for Kennesaw Mountain at the National Battle field.
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KENNESAW — Although Saturday’s 149th anniversary of the Battle of Kennesaw was a smaller production than in past years, Civil War re-enactors dutifully portrayed Union soldiers fighting the Confederate Army for control of the local supply line provided by Georgia’s train system.

The drop in the number of spectators and participants at Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park was due to many regulars of the event being at the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg in Pennsylvania on Saturday, according to park historian Willie Johnson.

A crowd gathered outside in the mid-day sun, near where Old Highway 41 and Kennesaw Avenue connect, to watch a presentation by the 21st Ohio volunteer infantry.

The artillery demonstration showed various marching positions, including how to carry a 9-pound musket and load a rifle during battle.

The unit’s first sergeant, Josh Haugh, called out for the line of re-enactors to aim and fire, causing a round of popping gun shots.

Eleven-year-old Andrew Smith, who was the unit’s bugle boy, said he started portraying a Union soldier a year ago after watching a re-enactment in Charleston.

“Every kid should know what soldiers had to go through in life,” Smith said. “What the tent life and camp life was like for them.”

Immersed in history

The park’s museum at 900 Kennesaw Mountain Drive connected the past to the present by displaying clothing and artifacts from the Civil War era. The collection is privately owned by Phillip and Janine Whiteman of PNJW Collections out of Alpharetta and not a permanent feature of the museum.

On Saturday, the museum’s book store offered a chance to grab author Brad Quinlin’s newest release, “In the Shadow of a Grim and Silent Kennesaw,” for $12.

Quinlin was on hand to sign the booklet of letters from soldiers fighting on both sides of the Civil War battle line.

The project, which includes 49 personal correspondences, took a year and half to complete with the help of a grant from the Kennesaw Mountain Historic Association, Quinlin said.

“Many of these letters were the last letters the soldiers wrote,” Quinlin said.

A man from the 125th Union regiment, Oscar H. Harmon, even predicted his own death in a letter the day before he died.

Quinlin said Harmon’s great-great granddaughter gave permission to use his last written words.

Quinlin said he was excited to see visitors of the museum take the booklet out into the park and “really immerse themselves in what happened here.”

Quinlin said one letter, titled “Roll Call after Battle,” was written on June 29, 1864, by Walter Clark, of the 26th Georgia infantry.

Clark describes the first roll call two days after the main battle at Kennesaw Mountain, when 22 names “were left silent” with no one to respond because those soldiers were either killed or captured, Quinlin said.
Comments
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P. Neaton
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July 02, 2013
The living history volunteers at Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park usually will portray Union soldiers one weekend and then on a different weekend they will portray Confederate soldiers. They do a good job of telling the story of the common soldier on both sides.
anonymous
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July 01, 2013
Please google films about world war one and please google films about world one two, etc. They are plentiful. For some odd reason, you missed them.
Lib in Cobb
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July 01, 2013
@anon: I said "re-enactment" as in the "re-enactment" being discussed in the article.
C. Smith
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July 01, 2013
Another stupid comment. Have you researched the numerous movies made about the first and second world wars, in addition to the Vietman war? Troll. If you hate the south so much, why do you live in it? Why do you continue to troll and make dark, ugly comments? Loving to wallow in despair of a lost cause, are you? For some odd reason, you troll and make negative comments about everything, and I do mean everything. Lib, today go out into the sunshine. Let it shine on your depressed life. You seem to be against everything.
Lib in Cobb
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July 01, 2013
@ C. Smith: I was referring to re-enactment as in the re-enactment being discussed. Get it? I am not against everything, just the conservative things. I can't leave yet, my goal is to get under the skin of another 2000 repubs.

I will let you know when I a getting close to that magic number. I will count you as two.
Lib in Cobb
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June 30, 2013
Perhaps the drop in spectators and participants is more likely due to a lack of interest. Why continue to do this? It was a dark, ugly time in our history, the Confederacy is no more. This war was fought for some very valid reasons and it seems the south loves wallowing in the despair of a lost cause. We as a nation do not re-enact any battles of the first and second world wars, but for some odd reason the southern states love their re-enactments of The Civil War.
Southern Patriot
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July 01, 2013
Lib,

It seems you know very little about reenacting, both WWI and WWII are reenacted here and in Europe. Europeans also reenact the the American Civil War or the War for Southern Independence (a more accurate moniker). I suggest you tell the thousands of reenactors now in Gettysburg that their hobby is an activity limited to the Southern States. The Confederacy is alive and well in our hearts. If you find living in Cobb a bit uncomfortable I suggest you move to Atlanta or better yet head to I75 and take it North until you cross the Ohio River where you can find peace and happiness among your fellow liberals.
Really, Lib?!
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July 01, 2013
The Lib in Cobb post shows a profound lack of understanding of what is going on with the re-enactments. The participants are not lamenting the outcome of the war but celebrating their heritage. Their history. Like it or not, the South has a rich history of things other than the "ugly" things that get much more publicity. Why are there no battles of the two World Wars? Because THIS war was fought on U.S. soil pitting American against American. Sometimes brother against brother. It is unique in our history and an important part of our county's maturation. Turning a blind eye to it would make us a poorer nation...not in riches...but in knowledge. As the axiom goes...those who forget history are doomed to repeat it. So continue to wish that it would "go away". Ignorance may be bliss...but it is still ignorance.
Guess What...
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July 01, 2013
The northern states re-enact also... and relish in their historical butt-whipping.
Ray Puckett
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July 01, 2013
I love this historical event and missed being there. I will be at the upcoming reenactments. The confederacy had its roots in states rights something that the soldiers knew would be lost and indeed was by in large part. Slavery was Lincoln's reason. The vast amount of confederate soldiers were not fighting for the rich plantation owners and northern factory owners right to keep and own slaves. The constitution was the main reason my forefathers fought against Lincoln's army. Lincoln had to have a cause and his cause was slavery abolishment. States should have decided this as they were allowed in the north. That was not the case and today we continue to suffer under a gigantic central government that the southern citizens was against, even today this is a sticking point. Should states be told to allow same sex marriage, ban guns, stop home schoolers, etc? Taxes are out rageously high. States like California sponge off of other states through federal taxation. All who dislike abortion now have to pay for it. I hate what America has become and it all started with Lincoln's war.
Old Man
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July 01, 2013
WWI and WWII were fought on foreign soil against enemies who were of a different nationality, thus the drive to reenact those battles isn't there.

The Civil War and the American Revolution were fought on American soil so the need to reenact is logical. The South (with a capital "S")do not "loves wallowing in the despair of a lost cause," but, like many of their Northern neighbors see it as a way to honor the men, Union and Confederate, who shed blood on this soil, and to show children what history looks like in action. Look at all the Union and Confederate troops at Gettysburg this week - they aren't all from the South. You will also find Revolutionary reenactments produced from time to time. But why wallow in the history of our country?

Enjoy the fireworks!
Lib in Cobb
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July 01, 2013
@reallylib: Civil war is not unique to only this country. Vietnam, brother against brother was common there also. Currently Syria is in the middle of a very nasty civil war. Truly you don't really think that we are the only country to have had a civil war. Yup!
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