Cobb school board members form subcommittee on educator compensation
by Lindsay Field
May 09, 2013 12:15 AM | 5012 views | 39 39 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
One of only a few items the Cobb School Board took action on Wednesday was the formation of a subcommittee to research alternative means of compensating teachers and principals.

The three-member subcommittee will consist of David Morgan, Tim Stultz and Board Chair Randy Scamihorn.

It was Morgan’s idea to form the committee to determine whether there is any correlation between degrees, years of experience and certifications and teacher effectiveness, as he has read in various research and studies.

“I want to make sure the pot of money is being used judiciously,” he said in reference to the district’s budget. “Is what we are basing compensation on, giving us our biggest bang for our buck?”

Kathleen Angelucci said she couldn’t justify looking into merit pay when the district is looking at cutting teachers, implementing five furlough days and not giving a full step increase to balance the fiscal 2014 budget.

“If I were a teacher, this would be a huge insult,” she said. “I don’t know why we are even having this conversation.”

Angelucci then asked Morgan if he would be willing to bring the board the research that shows there is no connection between compensation and these three variables.

Morgan said he would do that and proposed that they form the subcommittee to review this more closely, maybe over the next year.

“Let’s take a serious dive into this … see where the information falls,” he said.

The three will begin their subcommittee meetings sometime over the summer, and they will be open to the public.

In other business, the board also approved the appointment of Peter Giles, an assistant principal at Kell High School, to become Palmer Middle School’s new principal.

Palmer Principal Cathy Wentworth is retiring.

The group also unanimously accepted the retirement of Cynthia Hanauer as the principal at Murdock Elementary School.

Budget up for approval

The board also had one more in-depth conversation about the district’s fiscal 2014 budget, which is up for final approval at the May 16 night meeting.

Angelucci, who has been outspoken about preserving teachers’ jobs and the classroom as best as possible, asked several questions about specific funding.

She asked about lapse funding, which is the amount of money left over at the end of a budget year.

The board plans to use $10 million of the average $22 million in lapse funding each year to adjust the $86.4 million shortfall for next year.

“I’m trying to think of every job that can be saved,” she said when asking why they aren’t using the remaining $12 million in lapse towards their budget.

Angelucci also asked her board colleagues if they were ready to cast their votes on the budget next week or if they should postpone the vote and hold another special meeting before final approval.

For the first time in district history, the board failed to approve its final budget during the night meeting last year. The group came back less than a week later and approved it.

“I just want to make sure we get our t’s crossed and our i’s dotted,” she said.

No one responded to Angelucci’s question specifically, but Scamihorn said the board does have time between now and next Thursday to “shape” the budget and submit questions to Chief Finance Officer Brad Johnson if needed.

On the other end of the spectrum was Stultz, who said he believes the district should make the essential teacher cuts now to help future budgets.

He continued to say he would rather the district increase the number of teachers accessing online learning, which could essentially save Cobb Schools money in the long run if successful.

“I’m looking at the longer term … we need to start doing something now rather than save 10 or 20 positions,” he said.

Stultz also asked if Cobb Superintendent Michael Hinojosa would come back with an estimated cost to have an outside source perform an audit of the district’s funds.

Hinojosa agreed to check into that cost before next week’s meeting.

There will be a salary hearing Tuesday at 6:30 p.m., followed by a 7 p.m. budget public forum. A second salary hearing will be two days later at 6:30 p.m. The Thursday night meeting is scheduled to start directly thereafter.

Furlough days

The board also talked about when it would implement five furlough days next school year.

During Wednesday’s meeting, the group got its first look at the administration’s proposed days for this implementation. The board will approve one of two recommendations during next week’s night meeting.

Option A calls for furlough days to be implemented July 31, Aug. 1-2, and Feb. 13-14, 2014.

Option B, which is the one Hinojosa is recommending, will warrant furlough days on Oct. 3-4, and Feb. 13-14 and Feb. 18, 2014.

State law does not allow the district to use more than three days per semester.
Comments
(39)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
Col. Kurtz
|
May 10, 2013
And for those who say, "teachers are under paid and under valued" my reply is simply this: I chose to be an underpaid undervalued Soldier of Freedom ... !

As such,the front of my T-shirt says "What do you do?" and the back says "I jump out of planes and kill people!" ...after 12 combat tours and a traumatic brain injury TBI I have one final question, want to trade careers ... ?

I'll sit behind your desk and you can walk point on the next ambush patrol ... !

Oh, by the way ...soldiers, marines, sailors, and airmen don't get to have input into their pay rates or benefits and if we tried the powers that be would shut it down faster than a teacher on her/his way to a caribbean cruise in summertime.
Col. Kurtz
|
May 10, 2013
Last week I stopped by a McDonald's at South Cobb Drive unaware it was Teacher Appreciation Day.

To my surprize the manager asked if I wanted to leave a tip for the teachers; I told him sure ...

My tip to the teachers is this, "IF YOU CAN'T PAY YOUR BILLS GET A SECOND JOB LIKE THE REST OF US ...!"

Col. Kurtz
|
May 10, 2013
I have an idea ...why don't the teachers quit and get a job in Iraq or Afghanistan ...they are in dire need of teachers ...but, once there I bet the teachers would be praying for their job in America ...!
Col. Kurtz
|
May 10, 2013
To AnonymousTeacher,

My information came from a first grade teacher in Cobb County; she told me the teachers can choose to be paid on a prorated basis over the 12-month period or full pay for the 9-month school year. And as far only being off for 10 weeks out of the year, not 3 months ...it still sounds like a hell of a vacation to me!

As for thanking a teacher for my writing skills ...NOT! I learned how to write from reading the Readers Digest. The fact is my writing abilities far surpassed those of many, if not most, of my college professors as evidenced by the way they tried, unsucessfully, to proofread my written assignments and check for grammatical or punctiation mistakes. It was truly sad to have to explain the rules of grammer and punctiation to a college professor!
SARCASM
|
May 10, 2013
There are a lot of "educated" people on here that can't recognize sarcasm. "Just Baby Sitters" is proving these teacher's point and they DON'T EVEN RECOGNIZE IT! Read her post again. Read it slowly. Let it sink in this time-past the rage...There you go! You got it!



anonymous
|
May 10, 2013
In the corporate world, no, we don't get insurance for free. I don't know anyone that gets insurance for free. No, we don't get reimbursed for parking. No, my company doesn't even buy us ink pens anymore. We buy our own office supplies. No, we don't have a pension plan anymore. That went away several years ago.

You teachers have a cushy life. Stop complaining about it and enjoy it. No, I won't be taking half the summer off with pay. No, we don't get annual raises anymore. Yes, we do twice the work now with annual layoffs for years. I could go on and on and on about what corporate America has lost in this economy.

Stop bellyaching. You have absolutely nothing to bellyache about except for maybe people are looking for ways to make you do your job or get laid off, just as in corporate America.

@CryBaby Anonymous
|
May 10, 2013
*holding back tears* Oh the humanity....Sorry corporate scill. Guess you choose the wrong career path! I'm on the fast track to wealth and fame in my cushy teaching job!! P.S. I just got $1700 in gift cards for teacher appreciation week and I'm about to take a THREE MONTH PAID VACATION.
Can you read??
|
May 10, 2013
If you had bothered reading the previous posts, you would see time and time again that we are NOT paid for the days that school is not in session. Get your facts straight! And any time you want to try and do my job for a day, then come on down! Most of the "corporate" Moms (and Dads) that volunteer in my classroom for an hour (at most) tell me as they are walking out the door to their "cushy" job/life, "I don't know how you do this everyday." Again, any day that you want to come and do my job, I'd be glad to sit back and watch.
Then leave that
|
May 10, 2013
horrible corporate life and get a cushy teaching job. What's stopping you?
To Anonymous
|
May 10, 2013
You might want to do some research - teachers don't get "free" insurance. My insurance for my family of three is over $400 per month. We also are not paid for the summers - we are paid on a (barring furloughs) 190 day contract. Any summer money we get has ALREADY been earned. Don't you dare tell me I have a "cushy life" - I worked incorporate America, and not only could I go to the bathroom when I wanted, I wasn't at risk for getting punched in the face breaking up a fight. You're the one belly-aching in your post - be happy you have a job, and if you don't like it, there are 100s of unemployed people out there just waiting for the opportunity. Or you could go be a teacher if it's so darn cushy.
S Cobb Parent
|
May 10, 2013
More furlough days, bigger classes, more focus to online classes over in school, more in-school budget cuts, and now a proposed merit-based pay system for teachers...

...no wonder we are pulling our three kids out of the CCSD.
Col. Kurtz
|
May 09, 2013
I think furlough days for teachers is a great idea as the most fundamental problem with the teachers is they are prima donnas. And I posit furloughs will help put them in their place. Why on earth would I say this? First, they don't work but 9 months out of the year and collect unemployment the other 3 months. Second, they refuse to understand if you want to make a bunch of money you get a degree in Business or Finance; if you want to help people you go into public service. Third, they refuse to understand that if they can't pay their bills it means they are living beyond their means. And fourth, obviously the school systems can't even do what they're supposed to do, teach our kids, and yet they want to stick their noses in other areas, such as obesity ...I guess teachers are also certified dietitians. Besides, have you ever dated a teacher? I did ... she was a high school special education teacher as well as the craziest chick I ever met!

Anonymousteacher
|
May 10, 2013
I am not sure where you get your facts but teacher don't get unemployment for the 10 weeks (not 3 months)that they are off in the summer. Teachers are only paid for 9 months of work. Their paychecks are stretched over 12 months. I am not sure that our requests are unreasonable. We want to be paid for what our contract states we should be paid. It bothers me that because we have too much waste in central office that we have to pay for it(or not be paid for it). Most teachers I know are not living above their means. They do have a certain household budget based on their contractual pay. When that dips, it causes certain chaos as I would expect to happen in your house as well. There are a lot of teachers doing their jobs and doing it well. When society puts the value on education by doing instead of paying lip service, then maybe we can get back to the education system of yesteryear. When parents are involved, making sure homework is done and tests are studied for, then maybe we can see progress. When student show up for school, on time, prepared with supplies, then the day can start with success. If you are writing an articulate response (as I can read you did above) then you can thank a teacher. Without them, I would propose that you would not be where you are today.
@col. Kurtz
|
May 10, 2013
Nice trolling bro! Laughed out loud "collect unemployment" that's golden! It's illegal for teacher in Georgia to collect unemployment over the summer. You so cray cray Kurtz!
Goodbye Mr. Morgan
|
May 09, 2013
Does anyone remember that David Morgan was a teacher and Lindley MS and left in the middle of the year? I think his degrees were not working for him there. Does anyone remember that Mr. Morgan was principal of a Charter School in Atlanta that was slated to close by Atlanta Public School officials themselves because he could not balance the budget because he paid himself and others too much - oh and I suppose they didn't have degrees?

Can we ask someone with some common sense to run for his seat in the next election?
Col. Kurtz
|
May 10, 2013
I will ...and I can promise you the teachers would be praying for the good-old-days when they could go to school without paying for parking, which I would push to institute to help alleviate budgetary shortfalls.

It would also have the benefit of therapeutically coercing the teachers to start carpooling to help save money and improve their bottom line.
central greed
|
May 09, 2013
once upon a time, central office staff went to the Capitol Building and fought for the teachers. Now they seem to fight teachers and shut them up or out when the budget is cut.....gotta save their own perks and paychecks.
Col. Kurtz
|
May 10, 2013
The problem is the teachers don't like doing what they're told and they think they know everything!

Just because you're a teacher it does not make you an academically trained public administrator.

Maybe we should hire people with MPA'a to run the schools ...they couldn't do any worse than the current monolithic educational heiarchy.
mass exodus
|
May 09, 2013
I bet if they turn to "merit" pay there will be a mass exodus of teachers from the low-income/low performing schools in the South Cobb area. Also, good luck retaining quality teachers. Forsyth county was able to give their teachers a 1% pay raise last year and they are growing more than Cobb. I think the board needs to trim the fat in some areas such as central office staff and all of the Super's perks. Do we really need to pay for his car and stuff like that?

As far as pay per day, please keep in mind that teacher work way more than 8 hours a day. My friends that teach and coach/sponsor clubs are working 12 - 16 hour days, unless you coach Football your stipend isn't very much and some sponsors don't get paid at all. I feel bad for the teachers and students in Cobb County.
Col. Kurtz
|
May 10, 2013
Again ...if you can't pay your bills either get another career or a second job like the rest of us. Likewise, if you're teaching for the money then my guidance to you is to get out ...get out right now ...before you can hurt anyone else ...because if the pay is what motivates you I can guarantee you've already been hurting the students.
mass exodus
|
May 13, 2013
Um, I am not a teacher so telling me to get out of teaching and to get a second job is a moot point. I happen to have friends and family that are teachers and most of them do have second jobs unless they are married or have roommates.

Why do you hate teachers so much? From all of your posts on here you seem to hate them A LOT....
bctboy
|
May 09, 2013
I think the citizens of Cobb County need to form a committee to decide how to vote Mr Morgan out of office. How ridiculous to pay teachers on merit. And how will they evaluate teachers? I smell cronyism!!!!
anonymous
|
May 09, 2013
So if they shut the schools down for those days, what are all the hourly employees going to do? They need to come up with a way where the entire District is shut down if they want to save money. I bet maintenance, transportation, custodians and other departments have people driving, having lights on ,etc.
Col. Kurtz
|
May 10, 2013
Furlough days is not synanomous with closing the school ...use substitute teachers ...they're cheaper. And if there's already a lesson plan they simply follow it and the kids stay on track.
anonymous
|
May 09, 2013
I ask educators to do this for me. Start with your annual salary. Divide that into days worked in the year. Compare that to the average corporate days worked in the year. Boom. You are making a killing.
@anonymous
|
May 09, 2013
Are you aware we are paid by the day?
Anonymousteacher
|
May 10, 2013
For those who say we get summers off, spring break, Christmas,etc.... Keep in mind that the majority of teachers get paid for 7 hours a day but work 12-14 hours grading papers and planning lessons. We even work on the weekends, which is family time. During our so called breaks, we plan for the school year, attend professional developments, meetings, get our rooms ready(because there is no time during pre-planning) and much, much more. We actually need those breaks to catch up on paperwork, lesson planning, researching better teaching techniques, incorporating technology and more. So, please come walk a day in our shoes before you condemn us for standing up for our rights. You would run screaming from the classroom within two hours. That's a guarantee.
@GoodPoint
|
May 10, 2013
BooHoo...should have chosen a different career path bro!
Frustratedteacher
|
May 10, 2013
Teachers are only paid for 190 days. They do not receive "paid" vacation. Our salary is simply dispersed in 12 payments, which allows a school district to pay you after your work is completed but without having to pay interest. The 5 furlough days' amount is determined by our daily pay based on an 190 day year. We are only paid for 190 days but I assure you teachers work far more than that. Most all planning, grading, help sessions and extracurriculars are done on our own time. We also spend hundreds of dollars each year on supplies. Do you have to provide your own work supplies or purchase things for your customers?
Anonymous idiot
|
May 09, 2013
TO ANONYMOUS AND GOOD POINT: Teachers do not have paid vacations. We get paid for the days we work. We do not get paid when we are off for holidays as business are paid. We earn sick days and receive 3 personal days which come from our sick leave days. If we work 180 days, we are paid for 180 days. We can not go on vacation during the school year. TO: JUST BABYSITTERS: Babysitters are paid between $ 7-$10 an hour. We are extremely disrespected for the job we perform and I personally welcome any of you who love to bad mouth us to come in for a full week and do our job!
@Good Point
|
May 09, 2013
Since it is so gravy. Get your teaching degree and enter the ranks. No one is stopping you from enjoying those perks.
cobbmomof2
|
May 09, 2013
Take your corporate salary, divide it to determine your pay per day, then multiply by 170 and see how you like your salary. Teachers are receiving a 2% paycut in addition to furlough days. I have three college degrees, two above a bachelor's degree and with the paycuts I will make less than $40,000 a year. Yeah, I'm really making a killing.
mass exodus
|
May 09, 2013
You do realize that teachers are NOT paid for Spring Break, Summer, Thanksgiving, etc? They are paid for the 175 days they work and then their paychecks are spread out over the 12 months. If teachers are paid so well, then why do so many of them have 2nd jobs to get by?
@Good Point
|
May 09, 2013
I have been waiting FOREVER to throw this BACK at the corporate world..."Well then you should have made a different career choice". Wow, felt as good as I thought it would :-)
Officer Williams
|
May 09, 2013
Anonymous, if employees work more days do they get more pay? Teacher pay is spread out over 12 months. In CCSD they can't even elect to be paid over 9 months like some districts. Do corporate employees get allowances for travel, cell phone, parking? Do they pay for healthcare or is it free? Can they write off business expenses (good luck trying that as a teacher-IRS limits you to $250). Do they participate in profit sharing so they are rewarded for producing a superior product? Your logic is flawed.
Just-Baby-Sitters
|
May 09, 2013
Let's just pay them like babysitters cause that's all they are good for! Let's see, $5/hour times 8 hours is $40 per day. Now $40 times 40 kids is $1600 per day. Sounds good, $1600 times the 180 days that the lazy crap teachers work is $288,000 per year.Lazy teachers.
uarewrong
|
May 09, 2013
I am not even touching that one. I will let other teachers go off on you...
Good Point
|
May 09, 2013
Finally...someone points out a fact that teachers so often conveniently forget. I, working in the corporate world, would LOVE their summer break off days, Christmas break off days, and spring break off days IN ADDITION to their Paid Time Off/Vacation days!
Col. Kurtz
|
May 10, 2013
The bottom line is if you don't like your pay quit ...and we'll hire a younger person at a lower salary to replace you ...will that work for you ...?
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, and spam will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides