With former Campbell star in mentor role, Frye prospering as hurdler
by Carlton D. White
cwhite@mdjonline.com
April 27, 2013 12:17 AM | 2251 views | 0 0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Allan Frye’s maturation as a hurdler can be credited to two people close to him — Campbell coach Mike McCloud, left, and assistant Terrance Wilson. Wilson knows what it takes to be a successful hurdler, having once held school records at 110 and 300 meters — two marks that are now owned by Frye.
<Br>Staff photo by Kelly J. Huff
Allan Frye’s maturation as a hurdler can be credited to two people close to him — Campbell coach Mike McCloud, left, and assistant Terrance Wilson. Wilson knows what it takes to be a successful hurdler, having once held school records at 110 and 300 meters — two marks that are now owned by Frye.
Staff photo by Kelly J. Huff
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Allan Frye isn’t much of a showboater.

Even after the Campbell athlete broke the junior varsity records in both the 110- and 300-meter hurdles once held by his hurdles coach, Terrance Wilson, Frye didn’t rub it in.

It just wasn’t his style.

It was Wilson’s style, however.

“After I broke his JV record, he said now I should go break his varsity one,” Frye said.

It took a couple of years, but Frye gave Wilson his wish.

In the Region 4AAAAAA championship last week at McEachern, Frye set school records in the finals of the 110 and 300 hurdles, crossing the line in 13.81 and 36.54 seconds, respectively. That beat Wilson’s old Campbell marks of 13.91 and 36.63 that he set as a senior in 1997.

“When he came across the line, I knew he had the records,” Wilson said. “It was on the same track and at the same meet 16 years ago, when I set them. I was a senior — he’s a senior. I did it in the region final — he did it in the region final.

“He’s done everything I’ve done and more. He’s on the right path to doing some great things.”

Frye’s path will continue today in the Class AAAAAA sectional at Roswell.

The 5-foot-8 senior, who won the Class AAAAA state title in the 300 hurdles last year and finished second in the 110 finals, is excited for the chance to continue his season today. The top two finishers in each of two heats, plus the next four top times, will compete for the state championship next week in Jefferson.

“I’m trying to stay focused this weekend,” Frye said. “My main competition (Hillgrove’s Dyarius Tucker) has been at practice with me this week, and I’m looking forward to competing against him again. We’ll see what happens.”

Frye’s record run in the region finals, as well as his career results, cemented a long-standing tradition at Campbell, a school known for its success in the hurdles. Frye turned in the second-fastest 300 hurdle time in the nation this season — the fourth-fastest in Georgia history — and his 110 time was the seventh-fastest in the country this year.

“This is huge for Allan,” Campbell coach Mike McCloud said. “We’ve had a strong hurdle program for 20-plus years, and looking at the record books last year, Allan won Cobb County, region, sectional, state and he did well internationally, but his times weren’t in the school record books.

“I felt like he could run this well this year, especially after what he did at state last year. His demeanor, his dedication and his focus is extraordinary. He knows he has to keep getting better. His times are big for the program. We have a tradition of producing the finest hurdlers in the state, and what Allan did continues that tradition.”

Wilson ran for McCloud, and he now gets to share his wisdom with Frye as an assistant coach. The two are like brothers, and Frye credits a lot of his success to Wilson, who was a high school all-American and went on to become a college all-American at North Carolina.

“Terrance has contacted college coaches for me, and he keeps me going on the right path for my future,” said Frye, who listed Norfolk State, East Tennessee State and Florida State as his top college options.

A member of the Titans Track Club, Frye started running the hurdles in seventh grade because he thought they looked fun. He quickly found out that it was tougher than it looked, and before he could change his mind and find another event, his coaches told him that he was going to be a hurdler.

The result has worked out well. Frye said he is constantly working on his form and uses his speed to get himself through his hurdle races. He’s gotten better in both distances over time and hopes that he keeps improving.

With Wilson’s help, he has.

“Our relationship is like, he’s Yoda and I’m a young Jedi,” Frye said. “It’s a mentor-mentee relationship, or role model. We’re like best friends and I count on him to give me great advice.”

Wilson has also appreciated their bond.

“It’s been an amazing four years as his coach,” Wilson said. “It feels good to pass the torch on to a guy I’ve coached for four years. He’s the only guy I’ve had all four years, and he’s like a little brother.

“If Allan stays focused and driven the way he is now, I don’t think he can be beaten. He has a great chance to do well at sectionals and win both state championships.”
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