GOP leaders join anti-Common Core stance
by Jon Gillooly
April 25, 2013 12:17 AM | 7821 views | 38 38 comments | 24 24 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Joe Dendy
Joe Dendy
slideshow
Senator Judson Hill <br>(R-Marietta)
Senator Judson Hill
(R-Marietta)
slideshow
Representative Ed Setzler
Representative Ed Setzler
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Local Republican leaders are warning the Cobb County Board of Education about a vote scheduled today on the purchase of millions of dollars of textbooks they believe will tie the system into the Obama administration’s nationally prescribed Common Core curriculum.

This month the Republican National Committee adopted a resolution denouncing the Common Core State Standards, while Saturday local Republican districts, such as District 6, representing parts of Cobb, Fulton and DeKalb counties, followed suit.

“I believe it would be very wise for our education leaders to thoroughly examine all the ramifications of choosing to implement the Common Core curriculum and not be shortsighted to fill a budget shortfall,” said state Sen. Judson Hill (R-east Cobb), chairman of the Cobb Legislative Delegation.

Cobb GOP Chairman Joe Dendy said he believes the general public is unaware of the ultimate goal of Common Core.

As for the school board, “I would really ask them to be extremely cautious and do their due diligence in finding out about the Common Core curriculum and not take the word of the publishers because they’re just out to sell textbooks,” Dendy said.

State Rep. Ed Setzler (R-Acworth), said he opposes the rollout of a national education curriculum.

“Common Core is a careful effort to camouflage the implementation of a national curriculum,” Setzler said. “Control of curriculum is control of ideas and it’s just too delicious of a prize for the political left not to make it their business to control that process.”

Setzler and Dendy said when it comes to a subject such as math, there’s not a great worry of injecting a particular ideology in the textbook since two plus two is always going to equal four. But it’s in the other subjects where historical revisionism in favor of political correctness can come into play, they said.

“When you go and intentionally attempt to change people’s understanding and impression of history to influence their values and ideals, you begin to fundamentally change America,” Hill said.

Georgia’s funding issue

Georgia became attached to the Common Core agenda when former Gov. Sonny Perdue, long lambasted by critics for slashing public education dollars, accepted President Obama’s federal Race to the Top funding.

But Setzler said there’s no reason the state can’t extract itself from Common Core, “By opting out of Common Core and setting internationally benchmarked standards that we Georgians set for ourselves that does not make us beholden to any authority outside of Georgia.”

One of the masterminds behind the program is Microsoft mogul Bill Gates, Dendy said.

“He has put millions of dollars into this Common Core, and he’s extremely liberal,” Dendy said.

And then there’s the communist Bill Ayers, founder of the terrorist organization called The Weather Underground, Dendy said.

“The publishers of textbooks, schoolbooks really went from quite a few down to three or four basic publishers, and Bill Ayers sits on the board of directors for two or three of those,” Dendy said. “Now what does that tell you? Of course the textbook publishers are promoting this Common Core because it would mean that they could produce the same textbook for the entire country.”

J.D. Van Brink, chairman of the Marietta-based Georgia Tea Party, said his organization is reviewing the topic in order to take a formal position.

“We have started to look at it, and what we see we do not like,” Van Brink said.

One of Van Brink’s objections is the top-down federal approach to education.

“It’s not a federal responsibility. It is nowhere in the Constitution,” Van Brink said. “It is a state and local responsibility, primarily local. Here’s the problem of course. The federal government dangles this money in front of the states and the local governments and says, ‘hey, if you want this money, you’ve got to do X, Y and Z, and in order to get the money a lot of the time states do X, Y, and Z, and it’s not just with education of course. It’s with transportation, the list goes on and on and on.”

As for the school board’s vote today, Van Brink said, “I think it’s reasonable to delay until we can talk about it some more. I think that’s a very reasonable position.”

Federal expansion

Former state representative and retired Cobb School District teacher Roger Hines of Acworth, said, “I wish governors would take a different stand on these things, but they like federal money. I think that’s absolutely what it is. I tell you in my day we did without a lot of things and we still can if we have to. We’re just moving toward federalization of stuff and I wish we would do it different.”

During the past legislative session, Hill said he and other senators sponsored legislation that would withdraw Georgia from the Common Core National Education Standards and prohibit the student data collected under it from being shared outside from the state.

“The Legislature had several major education measures before it this session … and perhaps the impression that the time may be on our side before this is mandated, contributed to the bill not being considered,” Hill said. “While we’re out the remainder of this year, I and others continue to diligently explore the ramifications of the Core Curriculum and the impact on the state of Georgia and expect to renew our efforts for Georgia to make sure any education measure is best for our students.”

Cobb Board of Education member Kathleen Angelucci said what concerns her is that Common Core was agreed upon by Perdue and the state superintendent of schools without input from the local school districts or the legislature.

“They made the decision, and what bothers me is the fact that there was really no true input by teachers or communities,” Angelucci said.

Angelucci and a group of educators and residents recently had a two-hour meeting with Gov. Nathan Deal to share their concerns.

“I came away from the meeting feeling that the governor really has already made up his mind,” Angelucci said.

In her meeting with Deal, Angelucci said the governor favored the Common Core program because he was concerned about the students on Georgia’s military bases having a consistent education.

“And I see what he’s saying, but I don’t think at the end of the day that it’s worth us giving up our state sovereignty,” Angelucci said. “We’re the ones that should say what curriculum our students have. And once you sign that away it’s very difficult to get it back, and as a Republican governor I was very surprised to find out that he was willing to buy into it and continue to support it.”

Should the Cobb County School Board adopt Common Core curriculum?


Comments
(38)
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Diane S Vann
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April 28, 2013
Teaching geometry by a method that has never worked and denying teachers the right to correct it because their state signed on the dotted line is good for the USA? Give me a break.
Doch Savage
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April 26, 2013
The world is extremely competitive, and it's going to get much worse.

Besides, what is this pushback on consistent, high-level education? "Better to rule in Hell than serve in Heaven"? I'll admit that there is no perfect education system, but you need a strong common foundation before you can build a skyscraper. You need a building code to avoid common mistakes. This core is that "building code".

If you are interesting in your children's education, then work to improve this code.
Bill67
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April 26, 2013
The world is to competitive a place now. We need to keep up. Federalism cannot apply in education. Our nation simply needs to be more organized in terms of what we learn. We can better measure our child's progress and failings if we prepare from the same unified standard. I think this is the main reason our kids so lag, is that every state has it's own std. It's a terribly inefficient way for our children to keep up with the educational machines that China and Japan have, both of which are centralized in terms of their educational standards. Any other way in my view is shorsighted.
Lisa555
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April 27, 2013
The reason it our students lag is because unlike China and Japan, we educate all children no matter their intellectual capacity to learn. I think we should give everyone an education, but don't expect everyone to be capable of learning at "grade level." What ends up happening is our brightest kids, who could go on to be doctors, scientists etc if challenged, end up waiting on the rest of the kids to catch up and never reach their full potential. We are always trying to get EVERY student college-ready, but there are kids who will never be "college-ready," but who can be productive citizens and who might possible be able to graduate from high school if they aren't made to try to understand Algebra II. All people are different, with different needs and talents, we need to quit trying to make every person fit into a mold that some Harvard graduate thinks is ideal.
Lunaville
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April 26, 2013
Is this an Onion article? Are we really to expected to reject textbooks on the grounds that they might be in-line with federally recommended core values? After years of conservatives in Texas wielding disproportionate influence over the nations' textbooks, we are to believe there is left-wing conspiracy to gain control of the nations' textbooks?

A quote from Old Timed succinctly sums up the state of education in Georgia. "As a retired teacher, I, too am very. On earned about this common core.....especially the history and English." But, yes, let's reject textbooks over rumors, paranoid conspiracy theories, and pettiness.

Samuel Adams
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April 26, 2013
You sir are extremely naive. Ugh, YES, there is a left wing conspiracy, out in the open if you will only open your eyes.

The rejection of the textbooks here is also a rejection of the ideology behind the entire revolutionary attempt to take over local school districts by people with distinctly revolutionary pasts. Try reading a bit to find out about this.
misterbill
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April 25, 2013
I am old enough to remember how Germany was under the rule of Hitler and how he, Goebbels and the rest put the education of German youth on the national level.

I read recently where in Red Hook NY, students were forced to kiss other students of the same sex to "better understand diversity". I believe the good citizens of Georgia are better suited to determine what their children should and should NOT be learning. National education can be a threat to the concept of a republic.

Let us not take the risk. Let our state educators and our parents decide what is best for our students.

Kudos to Ed Setzler. always alert Laura Armstrong, (please come back Laura), and An Educator for their insightful words.
Kevin Foley
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April 25, 2013
That's right, misterbill. Let's teach the kids that Fred Flintstone and dinos co-existed.
Old timed
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April 25, 2013
As a retired teacher, I, too am very. On earned about this common core.....especially the history and English. It focuses on changing values and attitudes rather than learning facts. The English teachers will have unimaginable amounts of essays to evaluate. Reading assignments tend to be nonfiction. Parents, please go on line and evaluate if this is what you want your babies to learn.
Readmopaper
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April 25, 2013
Well, we have the current budget crisis and we have the current Common Core crisis. Do you miss 'the good ol' days' when we just argued about the calendar?
Just Wait
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April 25, 2013
Republicans can find evil Tinker Bell and the Easter Bunny.
Op Ed
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April 25, 2013
I'm sick of hearing about local control, less government, and other veiled political speak. Which is it? Local control or small government? As far as I can tell, the line is blurred (See Georgia Charter Amendment, Georgia Tax Credit Scholarships, and all the legislative committees about local control that keep popping up). History shows that Georgia's state and local leadership have not done right by ALL the people. As a result, glaring social disparities emerged providing the feds with a reason to pry in our business. Want the feds to stay out of our business? Do right by ALL of the people. The elected leadership needs to quit playing politics and get out of their ivory towers and into the communities (not some, but all) to get a dose of reality. The picture they paint is not an accurate one.
Kevin Foley
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April 25, 2013
What utter nonsense. This is the same self-defeating mentality behind rejecting Medicaid expansion. Government bad. Obama really bad.

From the Common Core web site:

Building on the excellent foundation of standards states have laid, the Common Core State Standards are the first step in providing our young people with a high-quality education. It should be clear to every student, parent, and teacher what the standards of success are in every school.

Teachers, parents and community leaders have all weighed in to help create the Common Core State Standards. The standards clearly communicate what is expected of students at each grade level. This will allow our teachers to be better equipped to know exactly what they need to help students learn and establish individualized benchmarks for them. The Common Core State Standards focus on core conceptual understandings and procedures starting in the early grades, thus enabling teachers to take the time needed to teach core concepts and procedures well—and to give students the opportunity to master them.

With students, parents and teachers all on the same page and working together for shared goals, we can ensure that students make progress each year and graduate from school prepared to succeed in college and in a modern workforce.

To appropriately cite the Common Core State Standards, use the following:

Authors: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers

Title: Common Core State Standards (insert specific content area if you are using only one)

Publisher: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington D.C.

An Educator
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April 25, 2013
This article is exactly right. Common Core is about taking local control away from parents and school boards and putting your child's education under Federal control. Giving up the federal dollars is a small price to pay to retain local control.

Old timer
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April 25, 2013
Amen....
Laura Armstrong
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April 25, 2013
William Ayers has been waiting for decades to take over our children's minds. He appeared in Atlanta in February at a teacher's conference, coincidentally the same day Obama was in town. He has now admitted he did give Obama his start in politics. He DID bomb the Pentagon.

In a speech in Venezuela, he said this: "I walked out of jail and into my first teaching position—and from that day until this I’ve thought of myself as a teacher, but I’ve also understood teaching as a project intimately connected with social justice... we must change ourselves as we come together to change the world. Teaching invites transformations, it urges revolutions small and large. La educacion es revolucion! ....education is never neutral. It always has a value, a position, a politics....capitalism promotes racism and militarism..."

If we allow militant radicals to take over education we are lost.
name calling
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April 25, 2013
What would you call those who adamantly promote creationism in public schools? Militant? Radical?
Old timer
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April 25, 2013
Laura, so true.....liberalism has taken over education. The
Laura Armstrong
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April 26, 2013
@Name Calling: we are not discussing the teaching of Creationism here, we're discussing the attempt of a small group of out-of-the-mainstream radicals such as Wm Ayers (bomber of the Pentagon, trust fund child, Obama mentor and likely ghost writer) and Arne Duncan (google his disturbing bona fides) who USE EDUCATION as their tool to promote the downfall of America as we know it and usher in the revolution/makeover that follows. They cannot get forty and above Americans re-wired into their communist utopia philosophy (Just look at Frogbreath...he's what, about 75 and entrenched in his knowledge of America when it was GREAT :) so they are going after our children, our college students, on a local level and disguising it all under the cloak of "Common Core." Read Ayers' unrepentent, chilling, radical speeches. He's very open about what they are doing, just not so open about the origins of Common Core. These anti-Americans, again, don't care about educating our kids, they care about using education as a TOOL to promote their political revolutionary agenda, the same way they used bombs in the 60s and failed. What's past is past....America has never been so close to losing our original gift. Race is only a factor when you are trying to gin up discontent the way Alinsky and Ayers do. They use race along with anything to make the people furious and angry so their revolution can move forward. Don't get hung up on creationism. The fight is much, much larger than one small point of contention.
Dr Teresa
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April 27, 2013
Laura, you go girlfriend! Public schools have always been the change agents for public thought in the US. If you want to change societies' thinking, you start with teaching the ideas in public schools. Desegration, environmental awareness, wild life conservation, inclusion of students with disabilities, and many more are examples. Some of the ideas introduced are good, but many are not. I DO NOT WANT ANY MORE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT INVOLVEMENT IN OUR LOCAL SCHOOLS. Of course all federally mandated issues to local school boards come with strings attached to money, most often they are unfunded mandates. I am stunned that Gov Deal doesn't see the unfunded mandates on the horizon.
Smitty the Democrat
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April 25, 2013
The republicans got whipped in the last national election. Further, Georgia which is ran by the GOP is near rock bottom in education. Stop listening to the republicans and you might just see an improvement in our education system. Duh...
anonymous
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April 25, 2013
Georgia is "ran" by the GOP????

We are laughing at YOU buddy.
Concerned citizen
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April 25, 2013
Look, it is taking Republicans a little bit of time to undo 130 years of Democrat-controlled state government, when GA was, you guessed it, "near rock bottom" on educational measurements.
Old timer
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April 25, 2013
Concerned citizen...Amen.....e
CTO123
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April 25, 2013
This article lacks balance. To find out more, please reference the Common Core State Standards Initiative online (http://www.corestandards.org/resources/frequently-asked-questions). So the GA GOP and TEA Party don't like it. Ok. Here's who does support it: the "CCSSO, the NGA Center, Achieve, Inc, ACT, the College Board, the National Association of State Boards of Education, the Alliance for Excellent Education, the Hunt Institute, the National Parent Teacher Association, the State Higher Education Executive Officers, the American Association of School Administrators, and the Business Roundtable."
This means nothing
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April 25, 2013
All of these are infested with liberal educrats and backed by the communist-connected, propaganda driven "progressive" political machine.

Regular moms and dads who believe in this country, who love freedom and capitalism and who don't want their children brainwashed from the beginning with social justice baloney will NOT stand for this. This is NOT a Tea Party issue, this is about keeping control of what our children are taught. If you want sharia taught in schools, if you want lessons on lesbianism (google the incident in a New York middle school just this week), get behind the Core standards, because they are designed to introduce American education to radical, progressive ideas.
@ This means nothing
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April 25, 2013
"Regular moms and dads?" "Brainwashed from the beginning?"

Brainwashed is exactly what you sound like.

African-Americans are regular moms and dads too, and although it's been a while since I've thumbed through public school textbooks, I don't remember reading books that reflected the full history of this country. The brainwashing didn't just start.

Thus the reason you would put such words to paper. A new curriculum would help us to get away from such brainwashing.
Faith walk
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April 25, 2013
Of course these entities support it. There is plenty of money to be made. Even non profits like the Gates Foundation donate money and then recoup it all. Watch the first video clip about how this all came about and the others show where it is headed:

http://www.patrioticmoms.com/1/post/2012/12/reclaim-local-control-of-education-now.html

http://www.stopcommoncore.com
Hines Hiney Showing
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April 25, 2013
I am still waiting for Roger Hines to file suit over the intermingling of tax voting between Marietta and Cobb. He CLAIMED it was not about alcohol when he filed suit about the Sunday sales vote. I would say he seems to have proven himself a big fat hypocritical Christian liar! What a surprise!

SO yeah, using the same materials as the 48 states ahead of us is a terrible idea. If we did that, we couldn't just say "oh well their textbooks are better than ours, so we are going to try these other new textbooks next." We would be exposed as anti-intellectual morons! What we don't realize is everyoen already considers us to be anti-intellectual morons! EVERYBODY ALREADY KNOW!
funny stuff
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April 25, 2013
So, let's reject Common Core, lose federal dollars, and compound the budget shortfall. Wait, we could raise taxes to counteract this problem, but the repubs would never consider that. I'm fine with dumping the national standards, but you have to come up with the money another way. Why did no one ask or address this?
anonymous
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April 25, 2013
You would sell your child's education for federal dollars? Well you must be one of those people who would trade your freedom as well.
mirbach
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April 25, 2013
Lest we forget that the Federal Gov't takes our hard earned dollars by force (calling it a tax), only to return a portion of it with strings attached (and call it a subsidy).

Lest we forget that the Federal Dept. Of Education is a construct laying outside of the Constitutionally enumerated powers. This agency should not exist.
frogbreath
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April 25, 2013
So what else and who else are you willing to sell for money ms/mr funny stuff?

Chasing dollars is the biggest reason we are overrun with illegals, ship jobs overseas and try to corrupt the minds of our children on a national basis.

In one lib=ne of endeavor that is called prostitution.Not so funny to most of us.
From Funny stuff
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April 25, 2013
Anonymous and Frogbreath,

You didn't answer the question: if we drop common core and refuse federal money, where do we get the replacement funds for schools and districts? Blind ideology gets you nowhere; you have to think logically about what the implications are for every action.

I'm not selling my children, their education, or anything else for federal dollars. I wish we had nothing to do with the fed, but the reality is that our state doesn't fund education enough as it is (under repub leadership for years), and if we drop another 5% of total money, we have to get it from somewhere. Are you prepared to pony up additional money to fund local and state education? I didn't think so. You don't want the fed, you don't want to pay for education, yet you want to decide what and how schools run. Do you see the problem there?

anonymous
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April 25, 2013
I am so, so, so very tired of all these multiple articles in the MDJ every single day, day in and day out, about schools. Narrow that down. Not about all schools (colleges)....mostly about primary and high schools. There is so much happening in Marietta (Marietta Daily Journal) that is not all about schools. Hey, you narcissistic people, I am talking to you that think schools and all the battles you have going on are the only important thing to all of our universes. Cobb County and Marietta do have people that have other problems and events going on in their lives, believe it or not. I am not saying education is not important; it is extremely important; but so are the lives of other people that live in Marietta and Cobb that are not employed by the school system or that have children in private school. I will be repetitive. Every single day you publish multiple articles about public elementary and high schools. Soooo over it. Am I just smarter than the rest of the school people or what? I think so. Look at the top schools in the nation. Study them. Don't settle (and why would you even go there anyway?) to be number 100 in Georgia or number 50 in Georgia or even number 25 in Georgia? Are there not people in our Cobb/Marietta Schools system that want to be NUMBER ONE IN THE ENTIRE COUNTRY? All I see is fighting. One fighting for this; one fighting for that. The common cause if I was in charge would be, "All of you just shut up and hear me." "WHAT CAN WE DO TO BECOME NUMBER ONE IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA?" And spending money is not the answer. Money does not buy success. Brains buy success. And all I see here is a tremendous LACK of those, therefore Obama has to try to make up for it. Oh, yes, you may have the best of the best buildings due to taxes, but your students are dumb bunnies? That is success? Please stop equating money with success. Please stop equating quality education with money. People became successes long before all these "puffball" things were a part of schools. We need to get back to the "pre-puffball" days and remember education. And this has nothing to do with political party. Geez.
Kennesaw Resident
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April 25, 2013
I am sure that you don't think education is very important, because you never did learn to use paragraphs when you write.
frogbreath
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April 25, 2013
anonymous,

Blah, blah, blah. With no paragraphs and a long winded rant.. Believe it or not, I understand your frustration, but you have done little to get your point across.

I agree that education does take up a lot of space in the MDJ, but it does take up a lot of space in life.

The more you move the responsibility of education to Big Government, the less the children will learn about our country which allows us the right to come here and express our opinions and get them published.

Are you aware that some schools systems in America no longer teach American history to the students?

--and the heck it does not have something to do with party. Conservatives want the best education for their children with certain aspects of life left to the parents, churches and their religions. Liberal progressives want to stifle freedom of religion and control the ideological thought processes of our children through brainwashing.

Be grateful there is so much information about education in the MDJ.

@frogbreath
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April 25, 2013
I think we have very different visions of what conservatives and liberals think about education.

You say "conservatives want the best education for their children with certain aspects of life left to the parents, churches, and their religions." Which aspects would those be? Like, Science? Critical thinking? Learning about other cultures? The conservative approach looks a lot like brainwashing to me! Brown people are bad, only Christians are right, fear all differences, Darwin was wrong, etc. Come on, froggy, you know it's true!

And to suggest that liberal progressives "stifle freedom of religion" is kind of crazy. A liberal wants freedom for ALL religions, not just those with Jesus. One Nation Under God is fine with me, as long as the Muslim can pray in school too.

You see, the liberal group wants to expose ideology, not control it. Critical thinking across the board is valued by progressives. Deprogramming is more of what they do--showing people that they can think for themselves, outside of what their parents, churches, and religions tell them. That is the value of real education, not hiding in the past, afraid of progress because it's scary and different.
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