White House: No military moves seen in N. Korea
by Associated Press Wire
April 01, 2013 03:50 PM | 448 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
In this Sunday, March 31, 2013 photo released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) and distributed in Tokyo Monday, April 1, 2013 by the Korea News Service, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un raises his hand with other officials to adopt a statement during a plenary meeting of the central committee of the ruling Workers' Party in Pyongyang, North Korea. After weeks of war-like rhetoric, the North Korean leader gathered legislators Monday, April 1, 2013 for an annual spring parliamentary session taking place one day after top party officials adopted a statement declaring building nuclear weapons and the economy the nation's top priorities. (AP Photo/KCNA via KNS)
In this Sunday, March 31, 2013 photo released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) and distributed in Tokyo Monday, April 1, 2013 by the Korea News Service, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un raises his hand with other officials to adopt a statement during a plenary meeting of the central committee of the ruling Workers' Party in Pyongyang, North Korea. After weeks of war-like rhetoric, the North Korean leader gathered legislators Monday, April 1, 2013 for an annual spring parliamentary session taking place one day after top party officials adopted a statement declaring building nuclear weapons and the economy the nation's top priorities. (AP Photo/KCNA via KNS)
slideshow
WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House says that despite bellicose rhetoric from North Korea the Obama administration has not seen changes in the regime’s military posture.

White House press secretary Jay Carney said Monday the U.S. has not detected any military mobilization or repositioning of forces from Pyongyang to back up the threats from North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Nonetheless the U.S. has a made a point of publicizing its own recent military moves, including the deployment of bombers and F-22 stealth fighters to South Korea as part of two-month-long military exercises.

And on Monday U.S. officials said a Japan-based U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer capable of shooting down ballistic missiles had been positioned slightly closer to the Korean peninsula, though still within its usual operating area.

Last month, the Pentagon announced plans to increase by 2017 the number of Alaska-based missile interceptors designed to shoot down any prospective North Korean missile launch aimed at U.S. territory.

Pyongyang has reacted angrily to U.S.-South Korean military drills and a new round of U.N. and U.S. sanctions that followed North Korea’s Feb. 12 underground nuclear test.

Carney called the U.S. response “prudent.” He noted that such tough talk from North Korea is part of a familiar pattern.

Carney says the White House takes the threats “very seriously.” But he says the rhetoric “is consistent with past behavior.”

Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, and spam will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides