High climbers — Father-son team to climb Mount Kilimanjaro to raise money for orphans
by Sheri Kell
business@mdjonline.com
January 30, 2013 12:17 AM | 3798 views | 3 3 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Lance Cooper smiles with his son, Asa, 17, at his office. Cooper, of the Cooper Firm, has faced many battles in the courtroom, but his latest undertaking is a steep challenge. Next week, Cooper and Asa are traveling to Tanzania, in Africa, to join a team that will climb Africa’s tallest mountain, Mount Kilimanjaro, to raise money for impoverished orphans in Liberia. <br>Staff/Emily Barnes
Lance Cooper smiles with his son, Asa, 17, at his office. Cooper, of the Cooper Firm, has faced many battles in the courtroom, but his latest undertaking is a steep challenge. Next week, Cooper and Asa are traveling to Tanzania, in Africa, to join a team that will climb Africa’s tallest mountain, Mount Kilimanjaro, to raise money for impoverished orphans in Liberia.
Staff/Emily Barnes
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MARIETTA — Marietta attorney Lance Cooper of the Cooper Firm has faced many battles in the courtroom, but his latest undertaking is a steep challenge. Next week, Cooper and his 17-year-old son Asa, are traveling to Tanzania, in Africa to join a team that will climb Africa’s tallest mountain, Mount Kilimanjaro, to raise money for impoverished orphans in Liberia.

The father-son team is attempting to raise $100,000 for Orphan Aid Liberia, a charity that provides humanitarian support to an orphanage in the village of Balama. According to Cooper, some 300,000 children live in extreme poverty after they were orphaned in Liberia as a result of a civil war that ended in 2003.

Cooper became acquainted with Cartersville resident and Orphan Aid’s founder, Daryl Roberts, in 2009, and has been supporting the group since.

“When he invited me on the trip, I initially thought I didn’t want to be away from home for two weeks during Asa’s senior year,” said Cooper.

Asa, who is a student at Mt. Paran Christian High School, readily agreed to make school arrangements in order to join his father for the endeavor and will turn 18 during the trip.

The duo are personally paying for 100 percent of the travel costs in order for all money raised to go directly to the orphans for food, medical care, clothes, deworming, education and missionary support.

Cooper said the climb, which begins Feb. 9, will take eight days, and each will carry an 80-pound backpack.

“The mountain is unique in that it has all sorts of weather,” he said. “It will go from desert, to rainy forests, to ice,” Cooper said.

The descent down the mountain is faster and is expected to take a day and a half. Asa plans to webcast during their journey to keep friends and supporters abreast of their progress.

In preparation for the ascent of the mountain that has an elevation of 19,341 feet, the Coopers have spent the last few months training in a cross-fit gym, running and hiking.

Victoria Schneider, marketing director at the law firm, said the cause was inspired in 2008, after firm employees Sherry Kerr and Linda Stricker took a trip to Africa and witnessed the plight of Liberian orphans firsthand. “The desire to help spread fast through our small business,” she said.

To date, the Coopers have raised $10,000 of the goal, but plan to continue fundraising throughout the year. “As Asa and I climb … it is to help rebuild the lives of these children from the ground up,” Cooper said.

Comments
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Luek
|
January 30, 2013
Nice to know there are no impoverished orphans here in the US that could use $100,000.

Luek
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January 31, 2013
Please excuse me, I don't know how to follow my heart. I can't focus on what I need to be contributing to society. Instead, I fault others for doing what they have been so apparently called to do. It is terribly miserable being me.

sincerely,

Luek
Mountain Man
|
January 31, 2013
Are you helping any of them?
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