Curt Schilling might have to sell bloody sock
by AP News Now
October 04, 2012 11:30 AM | 457 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
This Aug. 3, 2012 file photo shows former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling smiling after being introduced as a new member of the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame before the baseball game between the Boston Red Sox and the Minnesota Twins at Fenway Park in Boston. Schilling might have to sell the famed blood-stained sock he wore during the 2004 World Series to cover millions of dollars in loans he guaranteed to his failed video game company. Schilling, whose Providence-based 38 Studios filed for bankruptcy in June, listed the sock as collateral to a bank in a September filing with the Massachusetts Secretary of State. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson, File)
This Aug. 3, 2012 file photo shows former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling smiling after being introduced as a new member of the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame before the baseball game between the Boston Red Sox and the Minnesota Twins at Fenway Park in Boston. Schilling might have to sell the famed blood-stained sock he wore during the 2004 World Series to cover millions of dollars in loans he guaranteed to his failed video game company. Schilling, whose Providence-based 38 Studios filed for bankruptcy in June, listed the sock as collateral to a bank in a September filing with the Massachusetts Secretary of State. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson, File)
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This April 26, 2007 file photo shows Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling's bloody sock and spikes on display at the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. Schilling might have to sell the famed blood-stained sock he wore during the 2004 World Series to cover millions of dollars in loans he guaranteed to his failed video game company. Schilling, whose Providence-based 38 Studios filed for bankruptcy in June, listed the sock as collateral to a bank in a September filing with the Massachusetts Secretary of State. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)
This April 26, 2007 file photo shows Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling's bloody sock and spikes on display at the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. Schilling might have to sell the famed blood-stained sock he wore during the 2004 World Series to cover millions of dollars in loans he guaranteed to his failed video game company. Schilling, whose Providence-based 38 Studios filed for bankruptcy in June, listed the sock as collateral to a bank in a September filing with the Massachusetts Secretary of State. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)
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PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling might have to sell the famed blood-stained sock he wore during the 2004 World Series to cover millions of dollars in loans he guaranteed to his failed video game company.

Schilling, whose Providence-based 38 Studios filed for bankruptcy in June, listed the sock as collateral to a bank in a September filing with the Massachusetts Secretary of State.

Schilling also listed a baseball hat said to have been worn by New York Yankees great Lou Gehrig and his collection of World War II memorabilia.

The Boston Globe first reported the filing Thursday.

38 Studios was lured to Rhode Island from Massachusetts with a $75 million loan guarantee. The state is now likely responsible for some $100 million related to the deal, including interest.

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