Members of CCSB give deficit solutions
by Lindsay Field
lfield@mdjonline.com
April 15, 2012 12:01 AM | 6096 views | 78 78 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
MARIETTA — None of the Cobb County School board members wants to have to go through layoffs and other cuts to deal with the $62 million deficit for Fiscal Year 2013, but they all have different ideas as how to close the gap.

The school board will approve the FY13 budget on May 17. For now, it includes cutting 350 staff positions; increasing class sizes by two students and the number of furlough days from two to five; reducing the number of work days from 180 to 175; delaying raises for half a year; eliminating 50 library positions; reducing, and eventually eliminating, funding for Project 2400; and taking $21.5 million from the $99 million in reserves.

On Wednesday, Superintendent Dr. Michael Hinojosa announced that the district could avoid layoffs if 350 employees leave the district by retiring, moving or resigning, but they are currently about 200 short of that number.

There are 14,127 employees in the school system, not counting the seven school board members.

“Our resignations are not hitting the pace that we had intended for it to hit by this time,” he said. The district should know by the first week in May how many of the 350 won’t be returning next year.

The other biggest issues teachers are facing are the possibility of more furlough days, which Chief Financial Officer Mike Addison said could save the district $15.3 million, or about $3 million per day, and increasing classroom sizes, which could save $18.6 million.

According to the 2012-2013 school calendar, teachers would take furlough days Feb. 19 through 22 and May 30, 2013.

Board Member Lynnda Eagle, a former educator who has represented northwest Cobb since 2008, said she doesn’t think there is any real way to “fix” the budget deficit because fewer funds are coming in.

“If you compare CCSD to similar districts around Atlanta, it is evident that we are one of the more lean districts,” she said. “Our administrators make less than most metro districts, we have a smaller central office staff than most, we have provided school nurses before they were partially funded by other sources, we have highly qualified teachers dedicated to our students and we’ve done this and more with a much smaller budget than many of our neighboring districts.”

Eagle said she doesn’t support five furlough days, but would consider two or three, and has asked that the district think twice about reducing the number of media parapros and increasing class sizes.

“I am concerned that we are looking to our teachers to help reduce the budget,” she said.

Central Cobb’s board member Alison Bartlett believes that the district can get its “biggest bang for their bucks” by increasing the student to teacher ratio.

Bartlett said cutting jobs is tough, but the economic situation demands hard decisions.

“Their jobs are valuable, but where does the $60 million come from if not there?” she asked. “When I was first elected (in 2008), the budget was $1 billion. We’ve lost close to $200 million in general fund revenue since I was first elected.”

Board member Tim Stultz, who represents southeast Cobb, said the budget problems won’t end anytime soon.

“I have been advocating for hiring freezes for the past two years to help with the increasing expenses, especially with more difficult times ahead,” he said. “I don’t believe revenues are going to rise enough over the next few years to offset expenses.”

Stultz believes more severe cuts are yet to come.

“This current model is not sustainable. The new reality is that property values are lower and that the state can’t provide full funding,” he said. “The solution is to change the model of how to provide quality education, or continue to make cuts until your expenses are equal to your income.”

Vice Chair David Morgan, who represents southwest Cobb, thinks the answer could be to give individual schools the authority to make cuts where needed.

“At a particular school, there may be a bigger need for media parapros than for other positions,” he said. “I wish that people on the school level could make those decisions. I think also it’s a way to create even more ownership on that level as opposed to these mandates coming down from central office.”

Morgan said he’s put his proposal in writing to Hinojosa in recent weeks and said the superintendent told him that he would get back to him if his staff thought it would help.

But northwest Cobb’s David Banks doesn’t believe they are needed at all and has previously asked why the district doesn’t dip into its $99 million reserve to cover the deficit.

However, Addison said that, according to board policy, at least one month of expenses, about $70 million, must remain in the reserves at all times.

John Adams, the executive director of Educators First, said his members are anxious over the possibility of possible layoffs, fewer workdays and bigger class sizes.

“Everyone was laboring on the assumption that there wouldn’t be (layoffs),” he said. “Frankly, they don’t have a lot of faith in the board and central office’s ability to keep teachers from being cut.”

“They get that there need to be cuts, but this is a year that started off with pay raises in the central office,” Adams pointed out.

Adams suggested school board members cut their $20,800 salary equivalent to the number of furlough days and tell employees that they won’t approve any new pay raises or new positions at the central office while furlough days or pay cuts are a possibility.

“Share the sacrifice by absorbing the mathematical equivalent for their pay, or at the very least give it to the Cobb Schools Foundation to show that they feel the pain too,” he said. “That will help restore teachers’ trust.”

Since Monday, he’s received about 15 emails and phone calls from members asking about the budget.

But Connie Jackson, president of the Cobb County Association of Educators, said her phone hasn’t stopped ringing since Wednesday.

“I have received over 100 phone calls, emails, and Facebook messages since the announcement of the possible (layoffs),” she said.

Jackson said they are very upset and anxious about how the cuts will be made.

“We want to encourage the district to not make the cuts based on seniority, but rather on performance,” she said. “That way you don’t lose some of your brightest and youngest teachers.”

Jackson is also asking any employees who plan on leaving to let them know as soon as possible.

“If you aren’t coming back, please say it now, because you could save a teacher’s job,” she said.

Also, she said that if cuts were up to her, she’d look to non-SPLOST items.

“I think things should be looked at like new buses … (and) textbooks cuts,” she said. “Those are better than classroom teachers who impact student achievement. Don’t cut the front end before you cut the back.”
Comments
(78)
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@Kennesaw Voter
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April 17, 2012
No, you don't have time to run the school system.

You're much too busy being Kennesaw's village idiot

to have enough time left over for the CCSD.
Cobb Native
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April 18, 2012
Why do I think they have paid their fair share. Because if they have lied for any lenght of time they have paid their share of school taxes. The only taxes that seniors are not paying is the school tax. They do pay property tax for general fund, as well as sales taxes, I believe that is where the funding for the senior centers comes from. Not he school taxes! You folks need to learn a little more about what you are talking about before spouting off.
Kennesaw Voter
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April 17, 2012
Things like Senior Centers are frivolous spending - cut them. Papros and teach assistants should be eliminated...seriously, who in the world needs them. A few years back we did not have them...we had volunteers but Cobb was over flowing with money so the Count School Board funded the nonsense and now that we don't have a wheel barrel full of money...they don't want to cut back...that is why they never should have been funded in the first place. Nurses should be eliminated...if your kid is sick, go pick him up and take care of him yourself....and we should not be giving a free education to the children of illegals...if you are an illegal, you have to pay a monthly fee or no seat in class for your child...that is just common sense. Don't like it? Then move back to your home country.

County Employees want the taxpayer to pay ever increasing taxes to fund their job, benefits, and retirement...Cobb has to make due with a reasonable amount of taxes. Stop the never ending increasing of taxes which is taxpayer abuse!! Every level of government wants taxpayers to pay more and more...DO YOU GREEDY people actually hear yourself?? It scares me that most of you vote because you won't be happy until the government takes everything away from hard working tax paying citizens....renters should have to pay a fee to put their child in school too...how about stopping that free loading...or raise the tax rate on apartments ...i am good with either solution.
Kennesaw Resident
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April 17, 2012
@ Kennesaw Voter, I do agree that the children of illegal aliens need to pay tuition to our schools.

As for renters, they should already pay for property taxes through their rent. A good landlord will include property taxes in his/her rental calculation and will include this in the rent charged if the market will bear it.
HipCheck
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April 17, 2012
Kennesaw Voter is so blindly enraged by the very existence of government entities that he/she is just blathering on.

What 'Senior Center' is the school system paying for? Doesn't exist. Renters pay rent to their landlords, who do pay property taxes. Ignorant argument. Teachers cannot legally administer medications to children, nurses can and are absolutely necessary. Need I go on?

You can't expect the same levels of service when teachers and public employees are absorbing the majority of budget cuts to these agencies.

cobb mom and teacher
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April 17, 2012
Please come to my school and assist the over one dozen elementary school children with their daily insulin injections. While you are at it, monitor and take care of the dozens of inhalers that are currently stored with the school nurse. With your extra free time, deal with the half dozen students with seizure disorders.

Since you are opposed to taxes I hope you have the courtesy to NEVER step inside a public library, call the police or fire department in an emergency and I'm only assuming that you don't drive on public roads.
CCSD Teacher
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April 19, 2012
Parapros are needed is Special Needs classrooms. If any of you don't believe it, come be me for one day!
polish falcon
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April 17, 2012
Lets look at the schools that have seven assistant principals, ie. Wheeler HighSchool, maybe four will get the job done. Saves two maybe three teachers.
Kennesaw Voter
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April 17, 2012
Hip Hip Hooray!!

GREAT IDEA!!
Cobb Teacher
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April 17, 2012
This sort of discussion is necessary, but it paints a terrible image of what is happening in the schools. My experience is spending my days among teachers who love their students and families who are doing their best. The budget problems are frustrating, but my colleagues and I wouldn't want to be anywhere else. Teaching children is beautiful, sacred, and fulfilling work.
Kennesaw Voter
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April 17, 2012
The school system is the way it is because of the school system leadership not because of hardworking taxpayers.

If you have lost your love of teaching children...get a different job...if you still love it...STOP COMPLAINING!!

BTW, Taxpayers are not singing "kume by yah" with you over this tax abuse issue.
Powdertowner
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April 16, 2012
I honestly don't know how fuel costs figure in, but I get behind buses every morning leaving Tapp Middle School in Powder Springs, follow them all the way up the E/W Connector and they turn on Cooper Lake Road and on South Cobb Drive. Why in the world are these buses not parked at a school closer to their routes? The drivers are parking close to where they live, driving their personal vechicles a short distance, then driving the buses 15 - 20 miles one way before the even get to their route.
fieldtrips
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April 16, 2012
Class fieldtrips are paid for by the student not the schools. Cost are typically split among those that attend with some $ figured in to cover student sthat cannot pay. These cost include transportation cost for buses and drivers.
jp4ga
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April 17, 2012
However, some who CAN pay choose not to pay because they know thier cost will be covered.
anonymous
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April 16, 2012
For all of you talking about raising the millage rate, it's already at the state legal maximum. It can't be set higher than 20.0 mills.

The current year budget is based on 20.0 mills, yet property tax bills are at 18.9 mills due to the 1.1 mill buy down from SPLOST.

By the way, and thankfully, the school board can't eliminate the senior tax exemption. The school board does not have that authority.
Kennesw Resident
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April 16, 2012
@Anonymous, the CCSB may not be able to eliminate the senior tax exemption, but for those of us that want it gone, this is one forum to make our wishes known.
Kennesaw Resident
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April 17, 2012
@ Devlin Adams, I understand what you are saying about Medicare, but Devlin your ignorance is showing. Otherwise, you would understand that the premium you paid in was not high enough and that you should have been paying in a much larger sum all of these years. In this way, Medicare would act like the insurance program it is touted as, instead of the SOCIAL WELFARE program it is.
Sad Day
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April 16, 2012
It's a sad day when as a society we know longer have a concern for caring for our elderly. We can only hope the generations coming behind us don't feel the way many of you seem to.

It's true a better solution has to be found for education funding. Again, we can return to societal issues. We, as a society, are more willing to pay for entertainment than education. Look at what we're willing to pay those that entertain us, but not willing to share the same for education. It's very scare indeed!
Devlin Adams
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April 16, 2012
To Kennesqaw resident:

Your ignoirance is showing., IN real insurance, as you say, the patient pays a sey premium for his coverage. Sound familiar? That is how seniors have been payng for Medicare ever since its inceptions. And, we paid for it a long time before we were eleiogble to use it.

I can go along with you about the Senior Centers. How abour letting only those who use them pay for the libraries. And how about when you have a fire, the fire department bill, you in full, for all its expenses?
Re: Cobb Native
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April 16, 2012
I agree. That means only seniors should be paying for the Senior Centers and medicare. Great idea! Please call your legislator to let them know your idea! The rest of us can stop contributing tax dollars to anything relating to seniors and that will give the schools more money!
NOT at max.
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April 16, 2012
They raised it temporarily for the buy down. It needs to be at the max. permanently. No the board does not have the authority to revoke the tax exemption. Seniors will regret this when the schools system continues to decline. The schools are what bring people into the areas. Bad schools=bad neighbors.
Kennesaw Resident
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April 16, 2012
What is their "fair share?"

I would like to have the senior centers paid for by those that use them and my tax dollars not spent to subsidize them.

I would also like Medicare to be fully funded by something other than general tax revenues at 75%. How about we make it work like real insurance and have those on Medicare fully fund it? Then seniors would be paying their fair share!
Kennesaw Resident
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April 16, 2012
@ Cobb Native, why do you think senior citizens have paid their fair share? What is the fair share? Public schools should be funded by everyone with no special interest exemptions.

I guess if we really want to be fair as Cobb Native points out, we should let only those people using Senior Centers pay for them, and we should not have Medicare funded by in any amount by general tax revenues. Those folks on Medicare should foot the entire bill. Just following Cobb native's flawed logic there....

Cobb Native
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April 16, 2012
Kennesaw resident,

Senior citizens have paid there fair share. Why do you want to up their taxes now, when they are on limited, fixed incomes? I am not a senior citizen but I am planning to be one in the future. If you want to be really fair, make only folks with students in the schools pay and give them a voucher and school choice.

Kennesaw Resident
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April 17, 2012
@Sad Day, taking away the Senior Exemption has nothing to do with not caring about our elderly. It has everything to do with fairness. The elderly use a disproportionate share of resources in this country compared to others and also hold a disproportionate amount of wealth. The wealth gap between the young and old is the greatest it has ever been in this country.

It really is about making sure that the young have the same advantages that the elderly enjoyed when they received an education!
Bring on the Teacher
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April 16, 2012
90% of the CCSD's budget is personnel cost - 90% of which is controlled by a State Mandated and magically funded pay schedule which is based on longivity and degrees "obtained". The action and solution looks pretty clear to prevent the literal bankrupty of education in Cobb. Real evaluations, real performance measurements by building leaders that relate to salary earned - somewhat simliar to most of the real world. Pay the super and his area superintendents what the State of Georgia provides and not a penny more ? Now bring on the teacher and staffer comments !
AnotherCrappyTeacher
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April 16, 2012
What constitutes a "real evaluation"? Is it link to my test scores? How do I raise test scores for for students that DO NOT WANT TO LEARN? I will agree to your system IF you let me retain students that fail. I'm not asking to pick my team like a coach. I'm not asking to kick out the kids that get not breakfast at home, that deal with drugs and violence daily, that barely speak enough english to ask to use the restroom. I'm merely asking you since you have the solution: If we are going to pay teachers based on their students scores (the "real evaluation" you demand), how will we hold the STUDENTS accountable? Right now they only have to pass math and reading and if their parents petition hard enough 90% of the time we pass them on even if they fail the re-test. Now bring on the taxpayer comments!
Bring on the Teacher
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April 16, 2012
No mention was made of "test score measurements" as the absolute or otherwise ! Hey, CrappyTeacher, how would you like to be measured ? yes, I wrote my own performance plan in corporate America and it had enought meat for salary increases and promotions and other opportunities - but the boss had to approve it and measure it ! Give it a try - writing your performance plan with consequences !
Ignorance
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April 16, 2012
To Bring on the Teacher: You are ignorant as to how the education system works. I invite you to spend the week at Campbell HS or Osborne HS. After one week of taking on all of a teachers job duties, then you can open your mouth! If you are not a teacher, please do not respond with ignorant comments. Thank you!
@AnotherCrappyTeache
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April 16, 2012
AnotherCrappyTeacher, posting in the middle of the school day. How is that possible given the horid existence they lead? No potty breaks, etc. I guess blog breaks for whining are permitted.

Re Ignorance and comments about "Campbell HS or Osborne HS", you must be ignorant of the fact that you aren't required to work at places like that if you don't want to. You can be replaced in a few hours.
CRAPPIESTof ALL!
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April 17, 2012
You said in your own response YOU got to write your evaluation plan. Did you have people working for you (my students)? Could you fire them is they were apathetic and didn't perform or did you just push them on to the next unforntunate supervisor at the end of the year? I have worked corporate and education. You only have experience in education. No the ral question is why am I posting in the middle of the day? RETIRED but still vested in the advocacy of my brothers still in the trenches.
I'm just sayin'
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April 16, 2012
Problem solved:

A. Cut the big wigs salary as much as they are cutting the teacher's salary.

B. Get rid of the useless acamedic coaches in the school. It is an insult to all of us sport coaches to call them coaches. Since the beginning of the school year, I have seen them twice in my classroom. Most of the time they are in their huge office (a classroom that can be used for instruction and not their office) making lunch plans and talking on the phone. Oh wait - sorry. Once a month or so, they have to prove their worthiness by boring us to death on how to teach better. Hey - if you want to show us how to teach better, get your butts in the classroom and show us.

C. For all those soccer Moms and Dads that drive up in a $50,000 car and sparkling jewelry - get their child off of free breakfast and lunch as it is apparent they can pay for lunch, or at the very least, make something at home to bring in.

D. Get rid of the useless BOE folks. They are idiots and don't know their butt from their head. They make decisions based on who-knows-what, but sure as heck isn't in the best interest of our children.

E. Get rid of Hinojosa

I'm just sayin'
getoutnow1
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April 16, 2012
As a teacher I am telling you, now is the time to get out of Cobb. Move somewhere else because the quality of our education here has gotten worse and will continue to do so. I hear teachers on the front lines every day. They are tired, demoralized and ready to leave the profession. This is my final year of teaching and im only 39 years old. I love to teach, its unfortunate that Cobb is about to lose many of their best teaching staff to other states and other professions. Teaching is no longer a respected position.
Ways to find revenue
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April 16, 2012
While looking at cuts, we should also be looking for ways to raise revenue. I like some of the ideas posted in these messages already, namely, limiting the vacation accrual pay-out, and increasing the millage by a small amount. As a generally fiscally conservative voter it is almost hard to admit that last part! LOL. I would also suggest that we allow commercial advertisement on school property, for a fee. Parking spots could be painted by a sponsor and students would practically fight for who got the Monster Energy Drink spot, among others. Sidewalk bricks could be imprinted with company logos. Classrooms could be decked out by colleges and all would enjoy saying they are taking AP Calculus in the Georgia Tech room or Biology in the UGA room or Economics in the Sun Trust classroom.

Let's hear some creative ideas for raising revenue.
Agreed
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April 16, 2012
I have emailed the board on several occasions with these ideas. Other states are raising money for transportation by allowing advertising. All suggestions are ignored. This board can not come up with one useful idea in the 4 years that we have been in this downward spiral. They knew it was coming and continue to do nothing. Sad
reasonable taxpayer
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April 15, 2012
The real question with respect to both the school district and county government is whether the citizens of Cobb County are willing to pay for quality government, or whether they want to prove to the world that they are in synch with various outside special iterest groups which do not have this county's best interest at heart. Historically (I know there have been certain well-publicized exceptions), both have been pretty lean compared to virtually all other local governments. It is recognized by any objective observer that most salaries and benefits packages at both the school district and county government were some of the lowest if not the lowest for comparable agencies in other counties.

As anyone who has ever run a business knows, you get what you pay for with respect to how you treat your employees. Sadly, given how we have treated our teachers and other pubilc servants lately, I wonder if people looking to relocate to Cobb County would not be better off looking at other areas which do value these things more than we seem to.

O.K. government haters-fire away while your property values continue to decline because our schools are no longer what outsiders want for their children. I hope you at least feel better, even if you are poorer.
anonymous
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April 16, 2012
My property values are doing just fine, thank you.

The areas of cobb that have strong parental involvement continue to do extremely well - as they do whether the budget is up 20% or down 20%.

We - and essentially our entire neighborhood - moved to the neighborhood from other local school districts specifically because of the schools - and are glad we did.
to anonymous
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April 16, 2012
I am glad you are okay with your property values and the fact that teachers are being dumped on every day! You will not feel this way as the great teachers leave the profession or move to other counties.
@to anonymous
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April 16, 2012
Re: "You will not feel this way as the great teachers leave the profession or move to other counties."

I've heard this rant this year, the year before, the year before that, etc. from whining teachers. You know what, it hasn't happened, and it won't happen.

In fact, test scores continue to go up, as more pressure is applied to the teachers. Facts > Whines
Kennesaw Voter
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April 15, 2012
Here is how you can cut the budget

1. Get rid of the parapros = Dump them yesterday

2. Det rid of the nurses = never should have had them.

3. Have 5 furlough days.

4. No pay raise

5. Have all CCSD employees pay 100% of their own retirement...in other words - no retirement funded by CCSD.

6. Eliminate banking vacation and sick days.

7. Increase the amount of co-pays by all CCSD employees.

8. Elect me (if I had the time) to the CCSD Board
Cobb Dad
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April 16, 2012
It is obvious you have no clue.
Cobb Teacher
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April 16, 2012
First of all most of your comments are total nonsense and that is the best that I can say. Paras in elementary schools in particular are what make it possible for the school district to not hire more teachers.

Second, if you get rid of the nurses and a special needs or allergy riddled student gets seriously injured or dies the cost of the lawsuit would be more than the cost of the nurses for many years.

Retirement is controlled by the state. Secondly, Cobb does not pay any more into our retirement then the typical matching 401K. If you want to switch us to that type of plan, then fine--but you will need to start tiering pay to match the field one teaches in. So math teachers and science teachers at high school should get paid close to what outside math and science majors get paid per an hour.

Our co-pays are currently ridiculous as it is and again it is controlled by the state anyway.

Also, furloughs are counter to all that is typically done in the private sector--if you want to run the school as a business then you would fire a bunch of the teachers and hand a pay raise to those left--just saying.
anonymous
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April 16, 2012
Why are teachers posting on this blog at 10am on a school day?
Logistically
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April 15, 2012
Logistically, our teachers cannot absorb ANY MORE of the brunt of this economy: NO FURLOUGHS, NO SHORTER SCHOOL YEAR, NO SALARY CUTS AS HAVE BEEN DONE IN THE PAST. I am frightened for my small children that enter the classroom next year. What makes anyone believe that an individual will give 100% when they are being abused? Gas,Groceries, Medical Insurance, Rents and the economy as a whole is killing us all.

Now, let's have a job freeze, eliminate all waste such as the purchase of new textbooks and Academic Coaches. All Para-Pros must go unless they are SPED attached. CUT ALL SPORTS FOR ONE SCHOOL YEAR AND SEE HOW MUCH WE SAVE.
East Cobb Snob
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April 15, 2012
How about cutting athletics at all South Cobb schools, they just give Cobb a bad reputation and themselves losses.
South Cobb Dad
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April 16, 2012
My my...aren't we being hateful.
Sue Phillips
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April 15, 2012
Remember the "Sonny Money"? Maybe good spending habits should have been happening all along.

Flabbergasted in Cob
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April 15, 2012
Any educator that went into education with the idea of becoming wealthy is an idiot. STOP comparing our administrator / central office salaries to our surrounding districts. We're in a crisis here, people. Drastic times call for drastic measures. It's time to cut our administrator and central office salaries by at least 5%. If they don't like it - they can go find a job at one of these surrounding districts that we seem to try and measure up to all of the time.
Cobb Taxpayer
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April 16, 2012
Drastic times do call for drastic measures! Let's get rid of the senior exemption for starters.
Old timer
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April 16, 2012
Paras are important in all parts of education. I say, cut the pay of everyone at the county office 15 percent or more....all over metro Atlanta county office people are paid too much. furlough them for a week or three in the summer. Sometimes books do need to be replaced. That is not always an option. Charge a fee for athletes to cover coaching and expenses.

I am a retired teacher. I am so tired of teachers getting all the cost saving. Maybe increase the number of children that can walk to school. There are ways to cut. I might even. Lose the lunchroom and have everyone bring sandwiches....
anonymous
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April 16, 2012
Sure, cut the salaries of the maintenance people, the clerks who process your paycheck, the grunts who manage local school accounting, the drones who process your flexible benefits reimbursements, the worker bees who keep the computer network functioning.....hey, just get rid of all of the support people and conduct school under the open sky drawing in the dirt with a stick. You forget that "central office" is mainly lowly workers providing essential services that keep the schools supplied and functioning and who have had the THE SAME CUTS as the teachers. Direct your resentment at those who deserve it....the superintendent and board who approved raises to the select few highly paid administrators.
Morgan Tax Lien
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April 15, 2012
Further evidence that the school board is not qualified to make even the most "elementary" decisions on our children's behalf.

Rep. Alisha Morgan, D-Austell, said the $3,412 in unpaid state income taxes owed by her husband, Cobb County school board member David Morgan, was news to both of them. “We were not aware of that lien,” she said. Right. All the notices that are sent were somehow missed by the two supposed business "professionals".
KSUsed
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April 15, 2012
14127 employees but only 5900 teachers.....again a government agency that is top heavy and needs to trim from the top down.....let's start with the school board.....they absolutely need to cut their salaries.....if not reduce their numbers to five....
kennesaw mom
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April 15, 2012
Don't increase class sizes again! Making classrooms more of a zoo for students and teachers is not sound solution and never will be, Bartlett!
anonymous
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April 16, 2012
Terrific insights on how to reduce the budget gap.
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