Marietta police seek help from public with 19-year-old cold case
by Geoff Folsom
gfolsom@mdjonline.com
April 10, 2012 01:09 AM | 3615 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Marietta Police are hoping this GBI facial reconstruction will help identify a body found on Scufflegrit Road in June 1993. Police believe she was a victim of foul play. <br> Photo special to the MDJ
Marietta Police are hoping this GBI facial reconstruction will help identify a body found on Scufflegrit Road in June 1993. Police believe she was a victim of foul play.
Photo special to the MDJ
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MARIETTA — Marietta Police hope a new facial reconstruction can help them identify a body found nearly two decades ago.

The new reconstruction comes shortly after the announcement that an FBI forensics investigation determined the remains do not belong to Belinda Norred, a Cherokee County woman who was last seen Aug. 16, 1992.

Police had a handful of leads that could have identified the remains, which were unearthed by construction equipment on Scufflegrit Road in June 1993, but Marietta Police Officer David Baldwin said they have dried up recently.

Police believe the unidentified woman was white, was possibly born between 1957 and 1962, and stood between five-feet-three and five-feet-six inches tall. She was found wearing a white halter top, a scarf with an orange and pink diamond print design, a sleeveless tan jacket, elastic-band slacks, a 24-inch strand of white beads with imprinted blue flowers separated by gold color metal beads and multicolor bead earrings.

Baldwin said an autopsy of the woman led officers to believe she had been at the construction site at least 1½ years when she was found. While they have not determined how she died, they believe she was a victim of foul play.

Officers also believe the woman was not killed where she was found, which was in a wooded area, but was transported there after her death, Baldwin said.

The photo released Monday isn’t the first forensic reconstruction authorities have created, but it is the most advanced.

“The technology and training has changed since the early ’90s,” Baldwin said. “With the upgrades to technology, we were better able to come up with what this woman possibly looked like.”

Marla Lawson, a forensic artist with the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, put together the facial reconstruction, which is designed to show what the victim might have looked like at the time of her death. GBI spokesman John Bankhead said the agency performs the reconstructions as a service to law enforcement agencies.

“She travels the entire state doing these types of things,” he said.

Anyone with information on the case is asked to call the MPD’s tip line at (770) 794-6990 or Lt. Steve Campisi at (770) 794-5367.
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