Executive honor: Student the recipient of STEM teaching scholarship
by Marcus E. Howard
mhoward@mdjonline.com
December 08, 2010 12:00 AM | 1618 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Elizabeth Keilhauer of Marietta is a recipient of a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math teaching scholarship from the Hispanic Scholarship Fund through a donation by President Barack Obama.
Elizabeth Keilhauer of Marietta is a recipient of a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math teaching scholarship from the Hispanic Scholarship Fund through a donation by President Barack Obama.
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MARIETTA - Elizabeth Keilhauer of Marietta, a junior at Georgia College & State University in Milledgeville, is a recipient of a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math teaching scholarship from the Hispanic Scholarship Fund through a donation by President Barack Obama.

Keilhauer, 20, said she plans to use the $5,000 scholarship to continue her education in order to become a teacher.

"I felt extremely honored as well as very much relieved," said Keilhauer, a 2008 Pope High School graduate.

"It will be a large help. I currently hold two jobs, now with the scholarship I can drop a job and focus on my studies."

Obama donated a portion of his 2009 Nobel Peace Prize money to the Hispanic Scholarship Fund, which then dedicated it to scholarships to 12 students who showed a deep interest in teaching in the STEM field after graduation. The president has made math and science priorities for improving education in America.

Keilhauer, who born in El Salvador, is majoring in middle grades education in GCSU's John. H. Lounsbury College of Education. She also tutors local middle school students, works at the campus Career Center and is a member of the Latino Student Association.

"I'm deeply appreciative of how Elizabeth's award will support her in attaining her professional goals and bring further recognition to our Board of Regents' award-winning program in preparing the highest quality educator candidates," said Dr. Jane Hinson, interim dean of the College of Education.

At age 11, Keilhauer's family emigrated from El Salvador to the U.S. Her parents, Carlos and Sharon Keilhauer, wanted to raise their children in a safer environment.

After settling in Marietta, they began volunteering with the Special Olympics. Elizabeth Keilhauer's twin sister, Noel, has special needs. She has three other sisters: Katy, 22, Angie, 19, and Mary Grace, 15. Two of them attend Georgia Tech and one is preparing for college next year.

In October, the Hispanic Scholarship Fund flew Keilhauer and her parents to New York to attend its 2010 Education Summit for the Obama scholars' induction ceremony. There, she met New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Hispanic Scholarship Fund President and CEO Frank Alvarez, and was introduced to Nobel laureate Dr. Carl Wieman, associate director for science in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

"I loved it," said Keilhauer. "Everyone was so nice and I felt really important to be around so many important people that have really made an impact."

Keilhauer intends to use the scholarship funds to study abroad with GCSU's International Education Center summer program to Montepulciano, Italy.

Eventually, she said she wants to join the Peace Corps and AmeriCorps or Teach for America, and someday open an orphanage and school in a developing country.
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