Preservation efforts earn woman award
by Kristal Dixon
kdixon@cherokeetribune.com
November 21, 2010 12:00 AM | 649 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Jo Marchildon of Woodstock is the 2010 Barbara Ingram Citizen of the Year. The award is presented by Preservation Woodstock to recognize outstanding community service. Mrs. Marchildon was honored in part for her work with the Greenprints Alliance, which is building the Greenprints Regional Trail System in Woodstock.<br>Staff/Anthony Stalcup
Jo Marchildon of Woodstock is the 2010 Barbara Ingram Citizen of the Year. The award is presented by Preservation Woodstock to recognize outstanding community service. Mrs. Marchildon was honored in part for her work with the Greenprints Alliance, which is building the Greenprints Regional Trail System in Woodstock.
Staff/Anthony Stalcup
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While she's only been a Woodstock resident for four years, Jo Marchildon has already established herself as a citizen who's dedicated to retaining the city's heritage.

And her dedication to historic preservation has paid off, as she is the 2010 recipient of the Barbara Ingram Citizen of the Year Award.

The award, presented by Preservation Woodstock, is given each year to a resident who has actively worked in preserving the city's history and heritage and demonstrated service to the city.

Marchildon, 47, who is also a member of the organization, said she was surprised and thankful for the recognition.

"I think it's a very good compliment," she said of the award.

She will be formally recognized during the city's annual Christmas Jubilee and Parade of Lights at 5:30 p.m. on Dec. 4, at Woodstock City Park.

She is the 14th recipient of the award. Past recipients include Juanita Hughes, Smith Johnston Jr., Glenn Hubbard, David Rogers (awarded posthumously), Mary Lou Reece, Claud Barnes, Homer Hughes, Denver Rainey, Mary Johnston, Millicent Fox, Christine Blight, Raymond Dobson and Elaine Hubbard.

Preservation Woodstock primarily works at retaining the city's history and heritage through various projects.

Hubbard, president of the group, said Marchildon has been heavily involved in activities promoting the city and its heritage. Marchildon, she added, always is eager to provide a hand to the organization.

"She's one of these people who if you ask her to do something, she immediately says 'yes'," Hubbard added. "She's really a great citizen and a very deserving person."

Johnston, another member of Preservation Woodstock, nominated Marchildon for the honor.

Marchildon is a great advocate for the city, she said, and an asset to the group.

"She just brings a quiet dignity to any meeting," she added.

Marchildon, who lives in the Woodstock Downtown development, said she was greeted with open arms when she decided to become an active citizen.

Woodstock "has so many things" going for it, she said, adding it's in every citizen's best interest in be involved in their community.

Along with Preservation Woodstock, Marchildon is a member of the Greenprints Alliance, a nonprofit organization that raises money to build trails throughout the city, and the proposed Elm Street Cultural Arts Village, an initiative to bring the arts into downtown Woodstock.

She's a past member of Woodstock's Parks and Recreation Advisory Board and has been involved with promoting Main Street Woodstock, a collaborative effort by the city government and its downtown businesses to promote the central business district.

Originally from Albany, Mrs. Marchildon graduated from the University of Georgia with a bachelor's degree in business administration with a specialty in international business in 1984.

She currently works in marketing and promotions for small businesses. She and husband, Wayne, have two daughters, Caroline, 19 and Jordan, 17 and attend St. Michael the Archangel Roman Catholic Church in Woodstock.

Marchildon credits her parents, Dr. Charles and Marian Lingle of Albany, for showing her the importance of being active in the community.

The Lingles served in different civic groups in Albany, including her mother's past tenure on the YMCA's board of directors and her father's current post on the Dougherty County Commission.

Marchildon said she's glad to be among those commended for their work in preserving the city's heritage.

Preserving a community's history and heritage can not only build friendships and camaraderie among like-minded residents, she said, but also create a sense of pride in one's city.

"It's also important to preserve history for future generations to enjoy," she said.
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