MDJ Time Capsule by Damon_Poirier
This week’s Time Capsule looks at beer, the Medal of Heroism, a Senator’s rifle, vandalism and Kennesaw State University.
November 22, 2014 04:00 AM | 94787 views | 0 0 comments | 2703 2703 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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The Week of Nov. 20
by Damon_Poirier
November 22, 2014 04:00 AM | 18 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at beer, the Medal of Heroism, a Senator’s rifle, vandalism and Kennesaw State University.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Nov. 20, 1914 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a front page story about D.A. Summerour, who was in charge of the livestock exhibits at the Macon State Fair, going to Savannah for the fair in that district. Summerour won the first prize in Macon for the best 10 ears of corn for the fourth consecutive time.

Also on the front page of that edition, it was reported that the “Corn Club boys and the Canning Club girls” held their first annual exhibit under the direction of J.E. Creel at the Marietta Courthouse.

A third story announced the cotton ginners report, which stated that 13,758 bales of cotton had been ginned in Cobb County Nov. 1. That was over 1,100 bales more than the 12,629 bales ginned before Nov. 1, 1913.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Nov. 15, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal reported on the “largest ‘planned community’ development scheme ever proposed in the Southeast – a $30 to $40 million project.” The community, revealed by a team of Atlanta and international businessmen, was to be built on 300 acres in the Vinings area. It was expected to contain homes costing between $40,000 and $50,000, deluxe apartments, a shopping center, an office building complex and recreational areas that included a par-three golf course, swimming pools and playgrounds.

Another story in that paper said that the Marietta City Council had enacted an ordinance which established strict new standards for licenses to sell beer within the city. The ordinance, which prohibited issuance of a license within 300-feet of a church, school or residential zoned property, was prompted by a then-pending federal suit that challenged the city’s licensing code.

Engineers were reported in the Monday, Nov. 16, 1964 paper as having recommended that the old, original classroom building at Marietta High School be torn down after an inspection revealed severe structural damage. A leaking roof, sagging floors and crumbling walls were cited as the reasons for the condemnation of the then 41-year-old building.

Air Force Reserve Master Sgt. Vaughn W. Elsea of Marietta was reported in the Tuesday, Nov. 17, 1964 paper as having been awarded the Air Force’s Medal for Heroism. Master Sgt. Elsea received the medal for attempting to save others at personal risk after a Marine jet aircraft crashed into a residence in the Fair Oaks community on July 25, 1964 while attempting to land at Dobbins Air Force Base in Marietta. More about the Fair Oaks 1964 Jet Crash, can be found here in my Aug. 6, 2014 column.

The Cobb County Chamber of Commerce was reported in the Wednesday, Nov. 18, 1964 paper as having given Sen. Richard B. Russell a rifle so he could “properly defend” himself during a deer hunt that he was scheduled to attend on President Lyndon B. Johnson’s ranch in Texas. The veteran Georgia lawmaker also received a bright orange hunting jacket with the explanation that “we don’t want anybody to make a mistake.”

Vandalism of two rooms in Cobb County’s Superior Court was reported in the Thursday, Nov. 19, 1964 paper. The vandal knocking down the American and Georgia flags and wrote “defiant slogans against justice on the walls.” Officers took a 16-year-old girl into custody in connection with the incident. The girl, reportedly angry because her brother had been sentenced to the state training school for boys, was charged with hiding in the courthouse until it was locked for the night and then damaging the courtrooms.

Also that day it was reported that Gov. Carl Sanders, who just passed away on Sunday, Nov. 16, 2014, broke ground on the new $2.3-million junior college, which would later become present day Kennesaw State University. Gov. Sanders said in a speech during the event that the junior college would serve in the future as one of Cobb County’s “highest examples of civic pride.” Construction of the eight-building complex was scheduled to begin in May 1965 and the first 1,200 students would enroll in the fall of 1966.

20 years ago …

In the Saturday, Nov. 19, 1994 MDJ, it was reported that a Marietta woman was strangled during an argument with her boyfriend over her pregnancy and that her body had been found in the back seat of his car after a 100-mph chase through two counties in Alabama. The woman, the mother of three-year-old twins and 6½ months pregnant with her third child, died of strangulation and multiple blunt-force trauma wounds, according to an autopsy performed in Mobile, Ala.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Nov. 13
by Damon_Poirier
November 15, 2014 04:00 AM | 717 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a shooting, Lockheed, an Acworth mayor, KSU, the Braves, Newt Gingrich and Fred Tokars.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Nov. 13, 1914 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story about two men on the Atlanta electric car line having shot and killed each other in the car barn office on Church Street. Eye witnesses to the shooting said that it resulted from an argument over the European war, now known as World War I.

The two men had just finished their last runs and were sitting around the stove in the office. One of the men was writing out his report when the argument began. A minute later, the two men drew “.38-caliber Smith & Wesson special six shooters” that each of them carried and fatally shot one another.

Also on the front page, it was reported that R.H. Northcutt’s registered Jersey cow “Peach-Blossom,” which had won the championship at the Alabama State Fair, had won the same award at the State Fair in Macon. Everything exhibited by the Kennesaw Mountain Farm also won prizes.

Mr. Spicer of Illinois, who judged the cattle and hog competitions in Macon, came home with J.T. Anderson for the weekend and was said to have declared that he had not seen a farm in Georgia that equaled Anderson’s farm. Anderson had won several prizes on his Hereford cattle at the State Fair.

The entire second page of that edition was taken up with a list from Rev. G.W. Duval of all the hosts and delegates to the upcoming Methodist Conference taking place in Marietta.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Nov. 8, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that the Lockheed-Georgia Co. had launched a company-wide project named Campaign Zero Defect. The special project was held at the Marietta plant and attended by about 12,000 day-shift workers, Defense Department dignitaries and other guests. Portions of the program were beamed live via radio to Lockheed installations at Dawsonville; Atlanta; Charleston, S.C.; and Clarksburg, W.Va.

Also that day, the Lockheed Georgia Co. was reported as contributing $275,000 to the United Appeal, helping boost gifts from the five-county Atlanta Metropolitan Area to $3,804,493 or 85.7-percent of the goal.

It was reported in the Monday, Nov. 9, 1964 paper that Gordon Murray Combs died at Kennestone Hospital at the age of 78. Combs practiced law in Marietta for 30 years, was the assistant U.S. attorney from 1915-1922, the mayor of Acworth in 1926 and the U.S. Commissioner from 1926-1929.

Two other stories in that paper reported events that happened in the city of Smyrna. Burglars pried open a safe and stole over $1,000 from Sandy’s Drive-In restaurant on South Cobb Drive at Concord Road, and a fire destroyed an appliance repair shop near the Dickson Shopping Center.

In the Tuesday, Nov. 10, 1964 paper it was reported that groundbreaking ceremonies for Cobb County’s $2.35 million junior college in Kennesaw, now known as Kennesaw State University, were being planned for the following week with Gov. Carl Sanders delivering the principal address.

A second story in that paper announced that officials of the Milwaukee Braves said they would be in Atlanta within the next several days to sign a contract bringing the National League club to Atlanta for the 1966 baseball season. Thomas C. Reynolds, executive vice president of the Braves, said that he and William R. Bartholomay, chairman of the board, planned to sign a lease for Atlanta’s new $18 million stadium. Currently, the Atlanta Braves are leaving Atlanta for a new stadium in the Cumberland area of Cobb County that will be completed in 2017.

Australia was reported in the Thursday, Nov. 12, 1964 paper as wanting to buy a dozen C-130E planes from Lockheed-Georgia Co. Prime Minister Robert G. Menzies, in a statement on the government’s reassessment of defense needs in the Australian House of Representatives, revealed that “approval has been given to acquire 12 C-130E Aircraft.” The C-130E was manufactured at the Marietta plant and was a four-propjet transport in worldwide use by eight nations at the time and was also expected to go into service in New Zealand.

20 years ago …

With historic Republican gains in the House, east Cobb Rep. Newt Gingrich was reported in the Thursday, Nov. 10, 1994 paper as being in line to fulfill his longtime ambition of becoming Speaker of the House – the third Georgian to hold that office.

Saying that “His bed is made … so he’s going to have to lie in it,” a Cobb Superior Court judge ruled in the Friday, Nov. 11, 1994 paper that Fred Tokars would not receive public money to pay for defense expert witnesses and investigators. Tokars was facing charges of ordering the shotgun slaying of his wife, Sara Tokars, nearly two years earlier. His attorneys had asked the court to grant indigent status for their client, claiming that he was broke.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Nov. 6
by Damon_Poirier
November 08, 2014 04:00 AM | 1208 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at WWI, Lockheed, septic tanks, voter turnout, Wheeler High School and the Christian Coalition.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Nov. 6, 1914 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story about Turkey having joined the side of Germany and Austria in “the great European war,” what we know refer to as World War I. It was also reported that Italy and Greece were expected to join the side of the Allies. The German forces in Belgium that were believed to be trying to reach the seacoast in order to prepare for an attack on England had failed. Strong re-enforcements were being rushed to both sides in Belgium. The English battleship fleet was said to have been a strong factor in preventing the Germans from reaching the seacoast.

Also in that edition, half of the front page was taken up by a T.L. Wallace Clothing Co. ad announcing “Cold Wave Coming – Buy Your Overcoat Now.” The store was selling overcoats from $5 to $18.75 and sweaters from $1.35 to $5.

50 years ago …

A Marietta couple and an Acworth truck driver were reported killed in the Sunday, Nov. 1, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal after a head-on collision on the 4-Lane, now known as U.S. Highway 41, near White Circle.

Also that day, it was reported that Lockheed Aircraft Corp., together with its major subsidiaries, topped the nation’s defense contracts list during fiscal 1963 with awards totaling more than $1.5 billion. It marked the second year in a row that the firm had been the No. 1 defense contractor from a dollar volume standpoint.

Another story in that paper reported that overflowing septic tanks had become a major health hazard in Cobb County and threatened thousands of people. County health authorities claimed that with every rainstorm, leakage began in countless improperly-installed septic tanks and polluted pools formed on the lawns of homes. The conditions were threatening disease, making living uncomfortable and undermining property values in many residential areas, according to county public health engineer J.M. Womack.

In the Monday, Nov. 2, 1964 paper it was reported that 40,000 Cobb County residents were expected to vote on candidates ranging from the presidency of the United States to justices of the peace in Cobb County. A massive, record turnout was expected in Cobb and the nation in response to one of the bitterest presidential campaigns ever held.

The following day, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 1964, reported that nearly 15,000 people completed voting by noon – a strong indication that predictions of a record turnout would come true. Lengthy lines began to gather as early as 5:30 a.m. at some sites.

Sen. Barry Goldwater was reported in the Wednesday, Nov. 4, 1964 paper as having scored a resounding victory in the historic Democratic stronghold of Cobb County as he led a Republican revolt across the Deep South. Sen. Goldwater’s lead over President Lyndon Johnson of more than 4,000 votes was insurmountable with 28 of the county’s 29 precincts counted. It was confounding to historians that traditionally Democratic Georgia went Republican to the presidential race for the first time and forever-Republican states like Maine and Vermont turned Democratic.

Bids were reported in the Friday, Nov. 6, 1964 paper as expected to open in a week for the construction of the modern Joseph Wheeler High School in east Cobb – one of two new Cobb County high schools. Architect Cleveland Call released the model drawing of the facility located on Holt Road across the street from East Cobb Junior High School. The building, 92,000 square feet, was to have room for 750 students, be an air-conditioned facility with nine classrooms, five business education rooms, four science rooms, two home economics areas, shops, a library, a cafeteria – kitchen, administrative offices and a complete gymnasium. Wheeler High and a second school in Smyrna were expected to be finished by the start of school in 1965.

20 years ago …

In the Saturday, Nov. 5, 1994 MDJ it was reported that not all Cobb churches were falling in line when it came to distributing a voter guide orchestrated by the Christian Coalition, according to a random survey conducted by the newspaper. Of the 15 Cobb churches contacted, at least four said they were not going to distribute the guide, four said that they were and the rest would not go on record. The coalition’s aim had been to distribute up to 1.5 million copies statewide.

One of the most vocal critics of the effort was the Rev. Scott May, pastor of St. James Episcopal Church in Marietta. Rev. May said he was aware of the controversy and wanted his church to stay out of partisan politics. He also was critical of the Coalition’s effort to mobilize an army of conservative Christian voters.

Cobb’s largest church, however, Roswell Street Baptist Church, was reported as giving out the guide after services earlier in the week. Rev. Dr. Nelson Price stated that Roswell Street Baptist did not endorse candidates or tell the congregation how to vote. He said that the guide was strictly an informational tool for church members.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Oct. 23
by Damon_Poirier
October 25, 2014 04:00 AM | 636 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at WWI, a bear, a gas leak, Lockheed, rapid transit, the Braves, a gold mine and the F-22.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Oct. 23, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page had a story about the recent events of World War I in Europe. The Germans were reported as about to succeed in capturing everything there was in Belgium and preparing for an attack on England with a fleet of airships. The Allied troops, however, were reported as still pushing the Germans back in France.

Another story in that edition said that C.W. McClure, who had a store in Marietta, had sent the little black walnut bed that Mittle Bulloch used, when she was a child in Roswell, to Theodore Roosevelt. Mr. Broadwell, the former mayor of Roswell, had owned the crib for some time and allowed McClure to have it because he had intended to send it as a birthday present to Roosevelt.

50 years ago …

The nocturnal ramblings of the large black bear that was first spotted in Kennesaw, and mentioned in last week’s column, was reported in the Sunday, Oct. 18, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal as being spotted again in the Allgood-Sandy Plains Road area. Cobb Police received five calls about the bear and were said to have seen the animal’s tracks and “fiery, ruby eyes” as they were dispatched to the scene to search for the bear.

Also that day, it was reported that a mother and daughter were discovered unconscious in their home on Acworth Due West Road from a gas leak in a heater.

In the Monday, Oct. 19, 1964 paper it was reported that the first Lockheed C-141 StarLifter reported for duty to the U.S. Air Force at Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma. The plane was flown from Marietta to the base near Oklahoma City and was officially accepted by Under Secretary of the Air Force Brockway McMillan. Aboard the plane on its flight of about two hours were company officials and a party of aviation writers from across the nation.

Maj. Gen. C.H. Torhune Jr., commander of the Aeronautical Systems Division at Tinker AFB turned over the StarLifter to McMillan in a special ceremony. McMillan then turned the plane over to Gen. Howell Estes, commander of the Military Air Transport Service. The event was hailed as a new era of American defense.

The Board of Directors of the Cobb County Chamber of Commerce was reported in the Wednesday, Oct. 21, 1964 paper as giving unanimous endorsement to the proposed rapid transit amendment to the state Constitution. The amendment was expected to appear on the Nov. 3 general election ballot. Approval by the Chamber’s governing authority, considered a major breakthrough by proponents of the amendment, was given after the group heard former Gov. Ernest Vandiver label rapid transit as being “vital to the growth of the area.”

Another story in that edition announced that the Milwaukee Braves were moving to Atlanta. The Braves, which are slated to move from Atlanta to Cobb County in 2017, were reported as having their board of directors vote to ask permission from the National League to move from Milwaukee to Atlanta in 1965. The Braves were the first major league club to transfer a franchise in the country when they moved from Boston to Milwaukee in 1953.

In the following day’s paper, Thursday, Oct. 22, 1964, it was reported that National League club owners were expected to brush aside sentiment, tradition and the misgivings of baseball Commissioner Ford Frick by giving the Milwaukee Braves official approval to transfer their franchise to Atlanta. It would mark the first time in 11 years of major league expansion and realignment that a transfer of a franchise would leave a city without a big league team and the majors would invade the Deep South. It also said that it would bring a sad ending to the “Miracle of Sudaville” – an eight-year period during which Milwaukee fans supported the Braves with “record attendance and unparalleled enthusiasm.”

Lockheed-Georgia Company revealed in the Friday, Oct. 23, 1964 paper that it had under study an all-passenger version of the CX-HLS transport which would seat some 700 passengers on multi-decks.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, Oct. 18, 1994 paper it was reported that Cobb commissioners were voting to rezone nearly 23 acres in west Cobb near the Paulding County line, a former gold mine site, as a subdivision. The property, owned by west Cobb resident George A. Wynne, was the site of a former early-1900s gold-mining operation and was believed to be not only a gold mine but a gold-stamp mill and cyanide plant. Wynne’s son, Carl A. Wynne, had proposed to build a 37-home subdivision with 1,500-square-foot homes starting at $110,000. A pit that was 20 feet across and 12 feet deep was the sole remains of the former gold-mining operation.

The No. 2 man in the Pentagon was reported in the Thursday, Oct. 20, 1994 paper as heaping praise upon the F-22 Advanced Tactical Fighter, some two months after he suggested delaying the $70 billion project, which had come under fire from lawmakers as being unnecessary in the post-Cold War era. Deputy Secretary of Defense John Deutch also left open the possibility of reviving the C-5 airlifter as a replacement for the trouble-plagued McDonnell Douglas C-17 cargo plane and lauded Lockheed’s early work on the first new C-130 cargo plane in more than 30 years.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Oct. 16
by Damon_Poirier
October 18, 2014 04:00 AM | 790 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Marietta High School football, socks, Macy’s, a bear, Cobb’s junior college, Promina Health System and Fred Tokars.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Oct. 16, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page was an ad from the T.L. Wallace Clothing Company in Marietta announcing a week long sale of Styleplus $17 all-wool or all-wool and silk suits.

On the second page, there was a story about Marietta High School having just finished organizing a football team. For the past month, applicants had been competing and practicing for membership on the team. The first game of the season was expected to be played on Oct. 23.

Another story on the second page reported that Ralph Northcutt of the Marietta Knitting Mill had just shipped a car load of 11,000 one-dozen pairs of socks to California. The company also announced that it was not able to fill an order from the U.S. Government because of their inability to secure black dye, which was made in Germany and was currently waging World War I in Europe.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Oct. 11, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that Atlanta Federal Savings, Georgia’s largest savings and home financing institution, had announced plans to build a branch office in Mableton. A temporary office was to be opened in Hawthorne Plaza as a ground-breaking on the future site took place.

Also that day, the paper reported that the four-lane concrete and steel perimeter road bridge over the Chattahoochee River, completed in 1963, was to remain closed to traffic for another two months. Although the bridge had been paved and even had sidewalks, the Georgia Highway Department said it was not ready for traffic and would not open until the entire perimeter road, together with a cloverleaf, was opened from the Four-Lane (now known as U.S. Highway 41) to Fulton County, which was a distance of 34 miles.

A 450-acre tract of land in Cherokee County, just north of the Cobb County line, was reported in the Monday, Oct. 12, 1964 paper as having been sold to Byron Nichols of Detroit, the vice president of the Chrysler Corporation. But, Nichols squelched rumors that the land was being purchased by the auto company for construction of an assembly plant. Known as the “old Dean farm,” the land was located east of the Canton Highway and north of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad tracks.

A second story in that edition reported that officials of R.H. Macy and Company and Davison’s department store were to inspect the Marietta site purchased by Davison’s for the construction of a branch store. Jack L. Strauss, chairman of the board of the Macy’s department store chain, said that a Davison’s of Marietta was being planned for two or three years in the future.

Police in the Kennesaw and Acworth areas were reported in the Tuesday, Oct. 13, 1964 paper as on the lookout for a large wild black bear that was about six feet tall and weighed about 350 pounds. Three days later, in the Friday, Oct. 16, 1964 paper, the bear was reported still on the loose roaming now through the back yards of homes on Sandy Plains Road, seven miles north of Marietta.

Thirty-five U.S. Navy planes were flown from their home base in Key West, Fla., to Dobbins Air Force Base in Marietta to escape from Hurricane Isbell, a storm with 80-mph winds gaining force as it beared down on the Florida coast. The storm was expected to skirt west of Key West and strike the island of Dry Tortugas.

Gov. Carl Sanders and more than 30 local dignitaries were reported in the Thursday, Oct. 15, 1964 paper as scheduled to break ground on Cobb County’s proposed new $2.3 million junior college in Kennesaw on Nov. 10. Sen. Ed Kendrick also revealed that the State Board of Regents had chosen Kennesaw Mountain College as the name for institution, which is now known as Kennesaw State University.

A second story that day reported that Marietta city officials discovered that while automation was quick it also made mistakes. Eight unhappy residents called the Board of Lights and Water to report their water being shut off. The IBM card index machine said that the residents had not paid their water bills in two months, but receipts from the residents showed otherwise.

20 years ago …

Fearing a costly legal battle, the Cobb Board of Education was reported in the Thursday, Oct. 13, 1994 paper as having voted to immediately pull down all banners from high school football and baseball stadiums. The board’s action came in response to the controversy that arose at Lassiter High School, when the east Cobb school’s principal, Fred Sanderson, refused to allow a church banner at their football stadium that stated – “Jesus is Lord.”

Also in that paper, it was reported that Promina Health System, which later became the current day WellStar Health System, was officially the then-largest health alliance in the state with more than 2,000 beds. Promina was formed by a merger of Northwest Health System Inc., Gwinnett Medical Center and Piedmont Hospital Inc. At the time, the second largest health alliance was the Emory University Hospital System with 1,187 beds. Promina’s coverage area was Cobb, Cherokee, DeKalb, Douglas, Fulton, Fayette, Gwinnett and Paulding counties.

The death penalty trial of Fred Tokars was reported in the Friday, Oct. 12, 1994 paper as likely being held in rural northwest Georgia after a Cobb judge gave preliminary approval to a plan by defense lawyers and prosecutors to hold the trial in Walker County.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Oct. 9
by Damon_Poirier
October 11, 2014 04:00 AM | 600 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a Confederate soldier, the Elizabeth community, the Marietta Country Club, Haiti and Joe Mack Wilson.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Oct. 9, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a story about Dr. W.H. Perkinson having recovered a bullet that was fired by a Union soldier on Nov. 29, 1864 at Knoxville, Tenn., from the right shoulder of Confederate soldier Anderson Reed, who was a private in Gen. Robert E. Lee’s army under Capt. Tom King of Roswell.

The bullet, which struck Reed when he was 22 years old, penetrated his right lung and lodged in his shoulder. Reed recovered from his wound enough to resume work as a farmer and got married. But, the wound didn’t heal well and impaired his health to the point that he eventually gave up farming.

Eight years before the article, Reed sought to have the bullet removed and an X-ray was taken. During the operation, surgeons could not find the bullet. Then, in 1914, an abscess formed on Reed’s abdomen and Dr. Perkinson discovered the missing bullet.

50 years ago …

An 88-year-old black woman was reported in the Sunday, Oct. 4, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal as having been rescued from her burning Acworth home just before dawn by a neighbor. Acworth Fire Chief J.C. Jolley said the fire in the four-room house was of an unknown origin.

Also that day it was reported that bad weather forced Franklin D. Roosevelt Jr. to cancel his speech in Marietta at the Democratic Headquarters on Roswell Street.

Sheriff’s deputies were reported in the Monday, Oct. 5, 1964 paper as having arrested a husband and wife burglar team after a group of Smyrnans held the woman at gunpoint until police arrived. Deputies said that a group of residents on Pineland Circle in Smyrna became suspicious of a car that had been parked in the area and went to investigate after the car left in a hurry. Near where the car was parked, residents found a television set and then a woman hiding in the weeds.

A second story in that paper announced that Judge James T. Manning declared he had “grave doubts” as to the validity of a city charter for the community of Elizabeth – located between present day Kennestone Hospital and MUST Ministries’ Elizabeth Inn. Manning, however, gave the go-ahead for a referendum on the issue pending his final ruling.

Two days later, Wednesday, Oct. 7, 1964, it was reported that the citizens of Elizabeth voted nearly three to one in favor of an updated 1885 city charter which they hoped would make their community a self-governing municipality. In a light turnout, Elizabeth residents voted 93 to 35 for ratifying the 79-year-old, never-used document. The results, however, were unofficial by court order until a decision was reached in the suit challenging the legality of the charter.

Another story that day reported that stockholders of the Marietta Country Club had approved a $176,300 capital improvement program, which included expansion of the club’s golf course from nine to 18 holes. The action was taken at the club’s annual stockholders’ meeting.

Two Cobb County convicts who fled in county trucks while working on a road detail in the Smyrna-Oakdale area were reported in the Friday, Oct. 9, 1964 paper as having been arrested by Atlanta police three hours after their escape. The men were hauling asphalt in the trucks when they fled and ditched the vehicles in Oakdale before crossing into Fulton County on foot.

20 years ago …

With votes on limiting the mission in Haiti expected in Congress, U.S. Rep. Newt Gingrich, R-east Cobb, was reported in the Monday, Oct. 3, 1994 paper as saying that the Clinton administration was “on the edge of disaster.” Administration officials countered by defending U.S. military actions in chaotic Haiti and denied that U.S. efforts to stop the violence pervading that country was leading to “mission creep,” but said U.S. forces would become “a little more aggressive.”

American military patrols were rolling through Port-Au-Prince, Haiti, the country’s capital, searching for weapons after seizing 1,000 weapons at a border outpost and hundreds more at a paramilitary training base. In another sign of change in Haiti, the voice of exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide was heard on state radio for the first time in years. State media, which had banned his voice, was under the control of Haiti’s coup leaders until American troops had seized the installations.

In the Thursday, Oct. 6, 1994 paper it was reported that one of Cobb County’s most illustrious and best-loved politicians was affectionately remembered as an effective legislator, whose political wisdom and razor-sharp wit endeared him to many during the dedication of the Joe Mack Wilson Building at Kennesaw State College. Named for the former Cobb state representative and Democratic leader who died in 1993 while serving as the mayor of Marietta, the building housed the school’s performing arts theater, art gallery and a number of class and conference rooms.

A fundamentalist church and the Cobb school system were reported in the Saturday, Oct. 8, 1994 paper as headed for a legal collision course over whether a banner with the words “Jesus Is Lord” could be displayed in the Lassiter High School football stadium. The Rev. Bob Smith, pastor of the 101-member Open Door Fellowship Church on Holly Springs Road, told reporters in the church sanctuary that he would sue if the schools did not allow him to display the sign.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Oct. 2
by Damon_Poirier
October 04, 2014 04:00 AM | 365 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at WWI, bomb scares, the Atherton’s Drug Store explosion, Fred Tokars and a Confederate grave.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Oct. 2, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a story about the latest news from the European battlefront of World War I. The report stated that the Germans were being pressed back by the Allies and reports of preparations for a retreat by the Germans was in progress. The German army in Belgium had also started an attack on the outer fortifications of Antwerp, which was Belgium’s great seaport. The Russian army was said to be in Austria and continuing to press forward and that Italy was mobilizing troops to join the Allies when called upon.

Another story reported the presentments of the Grand Jury for the July adjourned term. Among the presentments were a land purchase recommendation and a bridge recommendation. The Grand Jury recommended that the Cobb Commissioners purchase suitable land, not to exceed 500 acres, for the use of a County Farm, where the necessary supplies for county convicts and stock used by the county would be raised. The bridge recommendation stated that a new bridge needed to be built above the high water mark on the road running east from Austell to the intersection of Powder Springs and Sandtown Roads upon the right-of-way of the Southern Railway Co. The then-current road, known as Maxham Bridge Road, had been condemned.

A third story in that edition reported that the North Georgia Conference of the Methodist Church that would be held in Marietta on Nov. 18.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Sept. 27, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that Marietta City Council had armed itself for an attack on slum dwellings by unanimously voting a new comprehensive minimum housing code. The ordinance set up health, safety and sanitation requirements while also calling for condemnation of any dwelling that fell below the standards.

Also that day, the U.S. Army, Navy and Air Force went up against the Marietta City Court and came away with what appeared to be a draw. Recruiters for the three branches were all facing multiple parking violations. For their defense, the recruiters read a ruling by the U.S. comptroller general which stated all federally-owned vehicles were immune to prosecution for city parking violations. However, the ruling also said that operators of federally-owned cars should make every effort to cooperate with city officials on parking meters and other regulations.

South Cobb High School was reported in the Monday, Sept. 28, 1964 paper as being evacuated after an anonymous bomb scare that was later labeled a crank call. Students returned to class after police and firemen searched the building.

Later that week, on Thursday, Oct. 1, 1964, it was reported that a small smoke bomb was thrown into the apartment of a student at Southern Tech, which is now known as Southern Polytechnic State University. An hour later, in an apparently unrelated incident, Kennestone Hospital received a bomb threat. The student, who shared the apartment with two other students, said that he believed the smoke bomb was a practical joke. The bomb scare at the hospital, however, was the second one in two months.

A second story in the Sept. 28th paper reported that the target date for beginning construction on the proposed 150-bed South Cobb Hospital, originally set for July 1964 and then October 1964, was changed to April 1, 1965. Cobb Hospital Authority member Harry Ingram said the postponement was brought about by delays at the federal level. The hospital, to be built as a joint federal-state-local project under the Hill-Burton program, was expected to open its doors approximately 15 months after construction began.

A half-million dollar suit was filed in Cobb Superior Court against the Atlanta Gas Light Co. by the survivors of one of the victims in the Atherton Drug Store explosion that happened on Halloween night in 1963. James W. Barfield and Robert Butler, husband and son of Mrs. Leslie Marie Barfield, filed the suit. Mrs. Barfield was one of eight people killed in the blast, which had been determined as an accumulation of leaking natural gas in or near the basement of the store. It was the first suit to be filed in Cobb County in connection with the explosion.

An injunction filed in Cobb Superior Court was reported in the Wednesday, Sept. 30, 1964 paper as having blocked the referendum for the proposed incorporation of the Elizabeth community, which was located between present day Kennestone Hospital and MUST Ministries’ Elizabeth Inn.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, Sept. 26, 1994 MDJ it was reported that attorneys for former Atlanta judge Fred Tokars were expected to move that their client be declared indigent when pretrial hearings resumed for the east Cobb resident accused of ordering the 1992 killing of his wife, Sara Tokars. Marietta lawyer Jimmy Berry, a member of Tokars’ defense team, said that the proper paperwork had been filed with the Cobb Circuit Defender’s office and he planned to ask Superior Court Judge Watson White to take up the issue.

Cobb County was reported in the Tuesday, Sept. 27, 1994 paper as possibly landing its first winery if a north Cobb businessman was able to jump through a few bureaucratic hoops. Phil Murray, owner of Mint Hill Cabinets, hoped to build the winery on a four-acre tract just north of Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park. The proposed development also called for a 1- to 1½-acre vineyard, café , a bed-and-breakfast inn and five cottages with a 175-car parking lot.

The final resting place of Confederate soldier B.F. Ward was reported in the Thursday, Sept. 29, 1994 paper as finally having been marked with a modest headstone, ending a two-year struggle for his descendents in Cobb County. Installed on Sept. 19th, the headstone was donated by the Department of Veterans Affairs to replace the stone that originally identified the grave of Benjamin Franklin Ward. The Civil War-era headstone was being kept in a basement at Manassas National Battlefield Park in Virginia because of a federal law that would not allow it to be returned to the Ward family.

In 1991, a Manassas woman had found the original headstone in her garage and gave it to the National Park Service. When Betty Duley, commissioner for the local Prince William County historical commission, asked to have the stone returned to the grave, which was in a private family cemetery in Manassas, Park Service officials said it would take an act of Congress for them to give the stone back. Duley then contacted Ward’s descendents in Cobb for assistance.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Sept. 25
by Damon_Poirier
September 27, 2014 04:00 AM | 945 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a circus, lawsuits, robberies, Ernest Barrett, moonshine, the Duchess of Vinings and Haiti.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Sept. 25, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a story about the death of J.A. Bagwell, the former editor of The Marietta Courier at the time it was absorbed by The Marietta Journal, who was fatally injured in a car wreck. Bagwell, who had been very successful in the automobile business since leaving newspapers, was killed when his car hit an obstruction and overturned while crossing a set of railroad tracks in LaGrange.

Also in that edition it was reported that the Ringling Brothers’ Circus would give two performances in Atlanta on Oct. 12. One of the new show features was “Solomon and the Queen of Sheba,” a colossal production presented with a cast of 1,350, a ballet of of 300 dancing girls, 745 horses, 32 camels and a trainload of scenery, costumes and properties.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Sept. 20, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that a former Southern Railway engineer who was crippled in a fire on railroad property was awarded $125,000 in damages by a Cobb County Superior Court jury. Court sources said that at the time “it may be the largest sum ever granted by a jury in a lawsuit tried in Cobb.”

The A-1 Finance Company in Mableton was reported in the Monday, Sept. 21, 1964 paper as being held up by a lone bandit. It was the second time in two weeks that the business had been robbed. The manager told the Journal the bandit got away with about $100 in the current robbery and that the lone bandit in the previous robbery had made off with $485.

Juries at the current September term of the Cobb Superior Court were reported in the Tuesday, Sept. 22, 1964 paper as having awarded verdicts totaling $62,000 in two State Highway Department Interstate 75 condemnation cases. In the first case, $23,000 was awarded to a couple for the taking of 16 acres of their land and for damages to their remaining property. The second case awarded $39,000 to a man for the taking of 14½ acres of his 20 acre tract and damages to the remaining property.

Also that day, it was reported that heavy damage was done to the grill area of the Pinetree Country Club when a fire erupted in a deep fat fryer the evening before.

The Phelan Finance Company office in the Belmont Hills Shopping Center in Smyrna was robbed of approximately $500 when a young white man, showing a revolver that he carried in his pocket, forced an employee to put office receipts in a sack. The Smyrna Police Department said the robber grabbed a bank bag containing $481.26 and fled from the scene in a 1965 Oldsmobile with a second person in the get-away car.

Ernest Barrett, chairman-elect of the first Cobb County multiple commission, was reported in the Thursday, Sept. 24, 1964 paper as laying plans for a brief, cool fishing trip in Florida to recover from a long, hot campaign to victory. Barrett was elected chief of the new five-man board of commissioners over Jack Henderson by a substantial 3,000-vote margin in the Democratic primary runoffs the day before. Bob Austin, a Smyrna civic leader who formerly served on the Smyrna city council, was named as Barrett’s deputy commissioner.

In the two Democratic runoffs for commission seats, B.L. “Bill” Oliver reversed the primary lead held by Dewey Gable and won, while Tommy Brown held his narrow primary advantage to defeat Steve Frey. A total of 23,976 voters turned out for the runoff election, a figure which was well above expectations of most authorities. In the primary, the total was 24,877. The unofficial tally in the chairman’s race gave 13,367 to Barrett and 10,303 for Henderson. Barrett, owner of dry cleaning and laundry establishments, led by 2,733 votes over Henderson, a veterinarian, in the primary two weeks earlier.

In the Friday, Sept. 26, 1964 paper it was reported that a patient deputy got his man and 150 gallons of moonshine whiskey. Deputy Sheriff Clifford Brown, new to the Sheriff’s Office from the Smyrna Police Department, saw a car traveling on State 6 that he believed to be a whiskey hauler. Deputy Brown waited for the car to return and stopped it. Inside the car he found assorted gallon jugs all containing a white liquid resembling water that turned out to be non-tax paid whiskey.

20 years ago …

More than two years after the death of the “Duchess of Vinings,” it was reported in the Monday, Sept. 19, 1994 MDJ that the future was finally coming together for the buildings she left behind. The history that was attached to Ruth Carter Vanneman, “the irascible Vinings matriarch” known as the Duchess, were to be preserved. At a street party and reception, the Vinings Historical Preservation Society was scheduled to officially take control of both the Pace House and the Yarbrough House, known for years as the home of the Old Vinings Inn.

The 130-year-old Pace House on Paces Mill Road was deeded to the society to be restored and maintained as a museum. Built about 15 years after the Pace House, the Yarbrough House, at the southeast corner of Paces Mill and Paces Ferry roads, would be donated for the society’s use by a subsidiary of Piedmont Hospital – which was planning to open a two-story medical office behind the building within a year.

The collapse of Haiti’s military rulers was reported in the Tuesday, Sept. 20, 1994 paper as being welcomed by U.S. Reps. Newt Gingrich and George “Buddy” Darden, who both remained steadfast against then-President Bill Clinton’s ultimately successful threat of force to bring down the dictatorship. The invasion was averted when the last-gasp diplomatic mission by former President Jimmy Carter; U.S. Sen. Sam Nunn, D-Perry; and Colin Powell, a former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, succeeded in persuading the Haitian Army commander Raoul Cedras to abdicate.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Sept. 18
by Damon_Poirier
September 20, 2014 04:00 AM | 420 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a burglar, a bank robbery, desegregation and Fred Tokars.

100 years ago …

In Friday, Sept. 18, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a story about a hobo burglar that struck a few residences on Kennesaw Avenue.

At the first home, the burglar stole $2.50 from a coat pocket and left the coat on the home’s well. There was apparently a considerable amount of money in a trunk and a purse that was overlooked. While the homeowner was asleep on a side porch, the burglar “prowled all over” the inside of a second home and took a gold watch and $6.50 but left jewelry untouched on a dressing table. The burglar also was reported to have opened the refrigerator, but only found nothing cooked and left the two dressed hens behind.

At the last house, the burglar stopped in the pantry and was reported as feasting “to an extent that he must have sorely regretted.” Half a big bowl of chicken salad, an entire sweet potato pie, a quart of sweet milk and a quart of scuppernong wine was reported consumed and that a dozen jars of fruit and preserves were missing.

Also in that edition it was reported that Josiah Carter, editor of the Marietta Journal, had been suddenly stricken with an illness while taking a walk in Washington, D.C., and had to undergo an operation at the Garfield Hospital.



50 years ago …

Free two-hour parking was reported in the Sunday, Sept. 13, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal as being unanimously approved by the Marietta City Council and going into effect around the Marietta Square in October for a four-month trial period. The action, put in the form of a temporary ordinance, was taken because merchants felt the meters were a deterrent to business on the Square.

Republican leaders were reported in the Monday, Sept. 14, 1964 paper as having issued a call to Cobb Countians to join a motorcade from Marietta to Atlanta to greet Republican presidential candidate Sen. Barry Goldwater. Between 50 and 60 cars were expected to leave from Larry Bell Auditorium in Marietta and travel to Hurt Park in downtown Atlanta to hear Sen. Goldwater speak.

Also that day, a driver charged with hit and run was reported as being rescued by his victim. Officers said a Marietta man was driving along Whitlock Avenue when his car was struck by a Powder Springs man who fled the scene. The Marietta driver followed the other car and watched the man turn right onto the railroad tracks at Whitlock just as a fast moving freight train bore down. After bumping along for a few yards, the Powder Springs man’s car stalled out. The Marietta driver ran on foot to the car and then yanked the other driver and his wife out just before the train smashed into the vehicle, where it was sent hurling off the tracks and into a nearby wall.

Gov. Carl Sanders was reported in the Tuesday, Sept. 15, 1964 paper announced a so-called “downtown connector” linking the north and south segments of Interstate 75 will be opened within a week. The connector was part of a $32 million interchange under construction that ultimately would provide free-flow traffic connections between Interstate Routes 75, 85 and 20.

In the Wednesday, Sept. 16, 1964 paper reported that professional burglars skilled in the use of explosives blew open a safe at the Smyrna Federal Savings and Loan Association at the Belmont Hills Shopping Center during the night and escaped with more than $2,000 in cash. FBI agents and Cobb deputies were investigating what was called “one of the largest burglaries to hit the county.” The heavy wall safe was torn open and ruined by the blast. The type of explosive used was not immediately known by officers. The following day it was reported that the burglars had used “some kind of ‘plastic’ dynamite.”

One of the two black girls who desegregated Marietta High School was reported in the Friday, Sept. 18, 1964 paper as having withdrawn from the school because of an illness. The pair of students who broke down segregation at MHS when they entered the 10th grade were reported as conducting themselves well at the school. Assistant Principal George Griffin said that the withdrawing student’s mother had determined that she was too ill to remain at school.

Also that day it was reported that two black students would be admitted to the previously all-white Southern Tech in Marietta when the fall term began later in the month. Director Hoyt McClure revealed that the application for one of the students had been approved already and the second was pending the passage of a math achievement test.

A third story reported that Marietta school officials said the race to complete the new Lemon Street High School football field by the all-black school’s opening home game was “extremely close.” Supt. Henry Kemp said the project could be ready on time if no further construction troubles were encountered and if the work moved along at a non-stop pace.

20 years ago …

Cobb commissioners were reported in the Tuesday, Sept. 13, 1994 paper as considering a three-year agreement with Northwest Georgia Health System that would cut indigent healthcare subsidies by $3 million in return for giving Northwest the county’s estimated $40 million healthcare business. The county had budgeted $12.5 million for fiscal 1996 to cover its 3,000-employees, who were covered by several health plans.

Also that day, a Cobb Superior Court judge was expected to hear a defense request to exclude the media from pretrial hearings in the case against former east Cobb resident Fred Tokars, who was accused of ordering the 1992 killing of his wife, Sara. Superior Court Judge Watson White allowed media coverage during the first day of hearings, although he ordered members of the electronic media not to record testimony of witnesses. One of Tokars’ lawyers, Jimmy Berry of Marietta, said because evidence might come out during pretrial hearings that would not be allowed in the death penalty trial, media coverage could taint potential jurors.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Sept. 11
by Damon_Poirier
September 13, 2014 04:00 AM | 642 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at World War I, a shooting, integration, a fire and a bank robbery.

100 years ago …

In Friday, Sept. 11, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a story about the continuing war in Europe, now known as World War I. Austria-Hungary was reported as ready to sue for peace on the best possible terms. It was disappointed and disgruntled at the failure of the German steam roller to crush France and Belgium, and with Russia crushing them, there was no other options left open.

The German army, which had crushed everything before its path, was reported as being checked by the Allied army at the very gates of Paris and were being steadily driven back with great losses. It was also reported that the German army facing reinforcements from England, Russia and Japan would probably be driven from France within days. The Russian army was said to be planning on marching straight to Berlin and that Germany would either have to sue for peace or divide attention between Russia and the French, British and Belgian armies.

A second story reported that there was no fixed market for cotton on account of the exchanges and markets being closed because of the war happening in Europe. All over the South various plans were being set to help dispose of the crop. As soon as the first bale of cotton was brought to Marietta, the Bank of Powder Springs in Cobb County outlined its plan and forwarded a copy for print to the Marietta Journal.

The plan consisted of farmers bringing their cotton bales into the Farmers Warehouse in Powder Springs where they would receive a mark, number, weight and class of the cotton. Then, the farmer would go to the bank and would be loaned money at nine cents per pound of cotton deposited at the warehouse.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Sept. 6, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal there was a photo showing a 100-foot parachute, opened for drying before repacking, that dwarfed a Lockheed C-130 Hercules assault airlift aircraft which used the large parachute to deliver heavy equipment to ground units in forward areas.

An 18-year-old Smyrna boy was reported in the Tuesday, Sept. 8, 1964 paper as being in serious condition at Piedmont Hospital in Atlanta after being shot in the head with a bullet while he and his father were fishing in Fulton County. The pair were fishing at a lake near Brantley and Isom roads when someone fired a rifle across the water. The boy was struck just above the ear by one of the shots.

Republican Presidential Candidate Barry Goldwater was reported in the Wednesday, Sept. 9, 1964 paper as having cancelled his Sept. 15 campaign speech in Marietta due to an Air Force regulation which prohibited him from landing at Dobbins Air Force Base. The Arizona senator, however, still planned to speak in Atlanta on that date and would land at Atlanta Municipal Airport in Hapeville.

Also that day, it was reported that white students fleeing West Fulton High School had in “large numbers” tried to enroll in Cobb County Schools following integration. Intensifying the problem, Superintendent Jasper Griffin said, were students living in the surrounding counties of Bartow, Douglas and Cherokee counties who had gained admittance to Cobb schools by false addresses. The West Fulton High School area found that the black students numbered roughly 50-percent of the total school population and white students began to withdraw in order to search for enrollment elsewhere.

In the Thursday, Sept. 10, 1964 paper it was reported that front-runner Ernest Barrett and runner-up Jack Henderson sailed into a final head-on race for chairman of the Cobb County commission after finishing on top of the five-man Democratic primary. It was one of three run-offs to be held on Sept. 23 in the elections for the chairman and four commissioners on the new multiple Cobb County commission. The chairman’s race drew the greatest interest across Cobb during the months of campaigning for local Democratic and Republican nominations. But, the turnout of approximately 25,000 voters out of a registration of nearly 50,000 was a disappointment to election officials.

The clubhouse of the exclusive Chattahoochee Plantation Club on Paper Mill Road was reported in the Friday, Sept. 11, 1964 paper as having suffered major damage when a fire broke out in the kitchen. Fullers Fire Department reported candlelight and steaks were still on several of the tables as they ran through the building fighting the blaze. Chief W.H. Williams of the Fullers department said the fire erupted in a grease vent and spread from there to other parts of the building. Firemen spent four hours fighting the fire.

20 years ago …

In the Friday, Sept. 9, 1994 MDJ it was reported that dozens of people on their lunch breaks in the busy fast-food strip along Windy Hill Road at Interstate 75 were stunned as they witnessed police officers gun down a man suspected of trying to rob a Wachovia Bank branch. Onlookers from the next-door Chick-fil-A watched as the tense scene unfolded.

A 46-year-old South Carolina man armed with a revolver and carrying a fake bomb was killed by police after taking a female customer hostage in the foiled bank robbery. The man’s hostage escaped just before he was killed by three shots from two Cobb County police officers, part of a contingent which had surrounded the bank. The man was pronounced dead on arrival at Kennestone Hospital.

After the suspect was taken from the scene, the Cobb County Police Department’s Bomb Squad arrived to check the briefcase that supposedly held a bomb. After a tense hour of trying to diffuse the potential bomb, authorities determined that it was fake. The device, police said, was a copper tube sealed with duct tape that had electrical wiring sticking out of it.

About 2½-hours later, Cobb Police nabbed an alleged serial robber who had hit an east Cobb bank for the second time in less than a month. The 25-year-old Decatur man robbed the First Union branch bank on Roswell Road in the Eastgate Shopping Center and was arrested a few minutes later at Paces Ferry Road and Interstate 285. Cobb police charged the man with six bank robberies and said he was also a suspect in a bank robbery in Fulton County.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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