MDJ Time Capsule by Damon_Poirier
This week’s Time Capsule looks at flooding, bomb threats, a movie deal, a blow torch assault and Fred Tokars.
April 12, 2014 07:30 AM | 45002 views | 0 0 comments | 1780 1780 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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The Week of April 10
by Damon_Poirier
April 12, 2014 07:30 AM | 461 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at flooding, bomb threats, a movie deal, a blow torch assault and Fred Tokars.

100 years ago …

In Friday, April 10, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the entire front page was taken up by a “Clothes for Easter” ad by the T.L. Wallace Clothing Co. in Marietta. Deals included $1.50 to $4 straw hats; $6 Panama hats; $5 and $6 Men’s Florsheim Shoes; and $1.50, $2 and $2.50 Manhattan Shirts.

On the second page, it was reported that William Tate Holland sold the farm of the late Col. R.T. Nesbitt for $20,000 to R.E. Butler. Holland was cited as “one of the best posted real estate men in Georgia” and that Butler was “so familiar with Cobb County property that if you name a farm or tract of land he can almost tell you the record of title without stopping to think twice.”

50 years ago …

The Cobb Democratic party officials were reported in the Sunday, April 5, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal as having fired a strongly-worded rebuke at members of the county’s legislative delegation for failing to reach agreement on a multiple commissioners plan for county government. In a statement read during the Saturday meeting of the Cobb Democratic Executive Committee, Party Chairman George Bentley expressed “concern” that the solons were using the issue as a sounding board to “test their political strength.”

It was also reported that day that a U.S. Air Force Hercules turbo-prop transport plane flew a 30-man Swedish contingent to the troubled Mediterranean island of Cyprus to take part in a United Nations peace force. It was the first American action on behalf of the U.N force. Informed sources said U.S. planes were also expected to airlift the 600-man Irish contingent pledged for the U.N. force.

Druggist J.W. “Bill” Cooper was reported in the Monday, April 6, 1964 paper as having become the first candidate to qualify in the race for Cobb County Board of Education. This was the first year for members to seek election to the board. Previously they were appointed.

In the Tuesday, April 7, 1964 paper it was reported that 29 families were driven from their homes along the banks of the Chattahoochee River by the rain swollen muddy artery. Hardest hit was Paces Ferry Drive, which was only a few yards from the normal bank of the river. Most of the homes on nearby Cochise Drive, situated in a bend of the river, were saved from heavier damage by the small high bits of ground that most of the homes were built upon.

The following day it was reported that scores of lakeside cabins, trailers and boat docks were swamped as Lake Allatoona rose to a near-maximum high and threatened to pour over the dam. Army engineers were forced to open floodgates to prevent water from surging over the top. The move was expected to increase the flooding in the Rome area.

Another story in the Tuesday, April 7 paper reported that “Captain Newman, M.D.” and “Werewolf in the Girls Dormitory” had to wait on the Marietta Fire Department while firemen searched the Cobb and Strand Theatres for a non-existent bomb. Capt. Bartow Adair said both theaters received a call saying there was a bomb set to go off in 10 minutes. The girls in both ticket booths identified the voice as a deep voiced male teenager.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, April 5, 1994 MDJ it was reported that the two Cobb detectives suspended for accepting money in a movie deal concerning the November 1992 shotgun slaying of Sara Tokars were fired by the Cobb county Department of Public Safety. The firings were announced by deputy director Toby Toler who said in a statement that the two were “terminated for violations of department rules and regulations.”

The following day it was reported that the police lawyer accused of approving the movie deal for the two lead detectives in the murder case resigned before the public safety department finished its investigation into his actions. The probe into the man’s role in the movie deal signed by the detectives was expected to have been finished by the end of the week, according to Toler.

Another story in the Tuesday, April 5 paper reported that a Woodstock man burned his common-law wife with a propane blow torch after they argued and then was beaten by her son. The woman was taken to North Fulton Hospital in Alpharetta where she was listed in serious condition with second-degree burns to her face and chest. A Cherokee County deputy on patrol found the man unconscious in his front yard where he had “been beaten severely about the head and shoulders.”

In the Saturday, April 9, 1994 paper it was reported that federal prosecutors convicted Atlanta lawyer Frederic Tokars of arranging his wife’s November 1992 murder as part of a wide-ranging cocaine and money-laundering conspiracy. Tokars, a former prosecutor and part-time judge, was found guilty on all counts. He faced a maximum sentence of life without parole. But, Tokars’ legal battles were not over. He was to return to Cobb County, where his wife was shot to death and face a death-penalty trial. District Attorney Tom Charron said that the federal sentence would not prevent Tokars from being tried in Cobb Superior Court and would not take precedence over a death sentence.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of April 3
by Damon_Poirier
April 01, 2014 11:00 AM | 99 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at small pox, a fire, botched heists, Lockheed layoffs and an officer shooting.

100 years ago …

In Friday, April 3, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported a warning from the Board of Health regarding small pox. The article stated that any community can rid itself of the disease in 30 days by isolating every case, thoroughly fumigating the infected premises and vaccinating every individual in the community. The story also mentioned that the Atlanta Board of Health had published that 900 cases were recently treated, but only 10 of the people had been vaccinated.

Small pox, or the red plague, was a lethal infectious disease of the small blood vessels located in the skin, mouth and throat. In the skin, the disease manifested as a rash and later blisters. The disease was believed to be responsible for an estimated 300 to 500 million deaths during the 20th century. Fortunately, after successful vaccination campaigns in the 19th and 20th centuries, the World Health Organization (WHO) certified the eradication of the disease in 1979.

Also that week the front page held an ad for The Swiss Bell Ringers, a one day only show that was billed as “The Biggest Treat Ever Offered to the People of Marietta” and “The Most Expensive Act Ever Brought to The Gem Theatre.” Admission for the 2:30 p.m. show was 10-cents, the 4 p.m. show was 20-cents and the 7:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. shows were 25-cents.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, March 29, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that the president of the Georgia Gold Star Mothers said the Army refused to supply a color guard for their State convention in May because there were no blacks in the organization.

A fire, apparently the handiwork of vandals, was reported in the Monday, March 30, 1964 paper as having razed the historic Sope Creek covered bridge before dawn on Easter Sunday and left a smoldering pile of tin and blackened beams in the creek bed. The fire was discovered by a motorist who was heading home from a party just as he rounded the curve before the bridge. Later that week, in the Wednesday, April 1, 1964 paper, it was reported that a $500 reward was being offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the vandals responsible for the fire.

Cobb County residents were reported in the Tuesday, March 31, 1964 paper as having flocked to buy the 1964 vehicle license plates on the day before the April 1 deadline. Throughout the morning a single file line serpentine from the tag office behind the courthouse down Lawrence Street with cars parked along Lawrence out to the post office. In the Thursday, April 2, 1964 paper, it was reported that 62,240 vehicle license plates were bought, which was 7,000 more than 1963.

Also that Thursday, lawmen searched Cobb and the surrounding counties for a would-be robber after his bold, patient plan to hold up the Bank of Acworth went astray. The bandit – wearing a pillow case with eye, nose and mouth slits for a mask – broke into the bank through the back door during the night and waited to accost the first employee reporting for work. But, the bandit – who was crouched behind a cabinet and facing the front door - was surprised by an employee entering at the rear entrance. The employee fled after the bandit pointed a large pistol him. Officers later found the pillow case tossed aside behind the bank.

The following day, Friday, April 5, 1964, the paper reported that burglars lugged a 500-pound safe down a flight of stairs at the Georgia Power Company’s Smyrna office before dawn. Officers on patrol drove around the building and discovered the safe in a panel truck ready to leave, but the burglars had fled. Bloodhounds were brought in to search the area, but failed to pick up on a trail. The manager of the office said that the effort wasn’t worth the gain since there was only $200-$300 dollars inside.

20 years ago …

Thunderstorms and tornadoes were reported in the Monday, March 28, 1994 MDJ as having killed at least 15 people in north Georgia. Cobb County was spared the brunt of the storms, but warning sirens wailed throughout the afternoon and evening as heavy winds, rain and hail swept through the county. A funnel cloud was spotted eight miles west of Powder Springs at 7:30 p.m., then another at 8:15 p.m. five miles north of Kennesaw and another at 9:31 p.m. near McCollum Field in Kennesaw.

In the Wednesday, March 30, 1994 paper, it was reported that Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co. announced plans to lay off more than 2,000 of its 11,700 workers by the end of 1995, citing declining sales of the mainstay project, the C-130 Hercules transport. Cobb County was expected to suffer a $70 million local economic loss as a result of the layoffs.

A veteran Cobb Police officer and his rookie partner were reported in the Thursday, March 31, 1994 paper as being wounded in a pre-dawn shootout after checking a parked car in a secluded area of Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park. The 32-year-old man killed in the shootout was described as having trouble keeping jobs, often depressed and had a fascination with weapons and the military. A close friend of the assailant stated that he was convinced it was a desperate act of suicide.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of March 27
by Damon_Poirier
March 25, 2014 10:30 AM | 122 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a mill accident, a prison escape, a gunshot wound, Sara Tokars and the F-22.

100 years ago …

In Friday, March 27, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported that the miller on Whitlock Avenue had a very narrow escape from a horrible death just before noon the previous Saturday. The man had gone into the engine room to put a belt on a pulley. When he reached up a set screw in the pulley caught his clothing. The man was then whirled around the shaft several times. Fortunately, on the first spin his foot struck the gas generator on the engine and knocked it away which caused the engine to stop. The slackening speed of the spinning shaft allowed him to fall down and saved him from “being beaten to a pulp.” However, three of his ribs were broken, one foot badly crushed and both of his legs were paralyzed.

Also that week there was an ad that dominated most of the second page of the paper for McClure’s Annual Housewives sale. For 10-cents each, shoppers could buy a scrub brush, a clothes line, a pair of children’s hose, a pair of ladies’ cotton hose, a ladies’ gauze vest, Huck towels, table napkins, a 10-qt. galvanized water pail, enamelware, a yard of colored oil cloth, a yard of embroidery, 5 bars of toilet soap, 16-oz. of talcum powder, a 8-oz. bottle of peroxide, a cloth brush, a card of pearl buttons, a horn comb, a whisk broom, a good pipe, scissors, box paper, crepe paper, gold band plates, a mixing bowl, a flower pot, a pudding pan, and a can of paint, stain or enamel.

50 years ago …

Nineteen prisoners in the Cobb County jail were reported in the Monday, March 23, 1964 paper as having torn bricks from a shower stall wall and crawling through the hole in a bid for freedom over the weekend. Sheriff Kermit C. Sanders said the men were lodged in the downstairs “bull pen,” which was an exercise area for the prisoners. To keep the guards in the dark, the prisoners had hidden the debris from their work in a mattress cover and placed a bed sheet over the gaping hole. After the plot was discovered through an informant, a brick mason was called to patch the hole and line the shower stall with sheets of metal. This was the fifth time that prisoners had tried to dig out through the shower.

Also reported that day, the Type III Sabin oral polio vaccine was administered to 32,245 Cobb County residents bringing the two-week total of immunizations up to 90,557.

In the Wednesday, March 25, 1964 paper it was reported that after five hours of deliberation, a Cobb County Superior Court jury upheld the 1963 tax revaluation program which had been challenged in a civil suit by eight county property owners. Had the verdict favored the plaintiffs, the collection of some $5 million in county property taxes would have been nullified.

Another story that day reported, the second suspect in the attempted burglary of the Woolworth store in Mableton was listed in “good” condition at Kennestone Hospital recovering from a gunshot wound and a self-performed operation. Sheriff Sanders and two deputies found the suspect at the home of a relative in Douglasville weak and woozy from a gunshot wound and blood loss after the man tried to cut the bullet out on his own with a razor blade.

20 years ago …

Cobb’s public safety director Robert Hightower was reported in the Thursday, March 24, 1994 MDJ as having been ordered not to discuss the ongoing investigation of two Cobb detectives accused of taking money for a movie deal related to the murder of Sara Tokars. Ralph Hicks, a Senior Cobb Superior Court judge, ruled that Hightower must refrain from discussing the case until the internal investigation had been completed and a decision was made. Ten days earlier, Hightower and District Attorney Tom Charron had announced at a press conference that the two detectives had signed a February 1993 movie deal with a California production company that paid them each $4,500 up front and were expected to later earn as much as $125,000 apiece.

In the Friday, March 25, 1994 paper it was reported that the General Accounting Office recommended delaying production of Lockheed’s F-22 by seven years, saying the current front-line fighter could outmatch any potential enemy. The report by the investigatory arm of Congress was a declassified version of a GAO study that examined the capabilities of potential enemy aircraft.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of March 20th
by Damon_Poirier
March 18, 2014 03:30 PM | 160 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a train robbery, a fist fight, a wounded solider, Cobb Hospital, Fred Tokars, neo-Nazi groups and a brush fire.

100 years ago …

In Friday, March 20, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported that a man was charged with the January 1914 robbery of the N.C. & St. L. Train in Vinings. After hearing testimony for most of the day in the Cobb County Superior Court, the jury brought a guilty verdict against him and a sentence of 20 years in the state penitentiary was pronounced by Judge Henry L. Patterson.

Also that week there was a story about Henry S. Manning buying the old Gem Theatre building on Lawrence Street from Marshall C. McKenzie. The building was to be remodeled and turned into a furniture store for J.S. Dobbins.

50 years ago …

A fist fight between two elderly men behind the Marietta Police Station after the Marietta City Council heard proposals for the closing of MacArthur Drive and MacArthur Circle was reported in the Sunday, March 15, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal. One man had requested the closing, while the other had spoken against it. The situation stemmed from the city’s efforts to eliminate street name duplications, which was drafted by City Planner Leo LaForge. After the 6-1 vote by the council to kill the plan, the two men went outside in the rain, fought it out and had to be separated by Chief E.R. Sanders.

It was reported in the Monday, March 16, 1964 paper that Lt. James E. Allerheiligen, a Smyrna airman critically wounded in the terrorist bombing of a Viet Nam movie theatre, had begun the week-long flight back to the United States. In the February attack, the airman was reported as having received near fatal head injuries and sat for days in a Saigon hospital unable to move or talk. At the time of his departure for home, the airman was walking, talking and had only a bandage under his left ear as visible evidence of his injuries.

Lockheed Aircraft Corporation announced in the Tuesday, March 17, 1964 paper that net earnings for 1963 were $43,254,000, which was up 16-percent from the previous record of $37,199,000 that was established in 1962. Sales for the year had increased 10-percent to $1,930,488,000 from the previous high of $1,753,074,000 in 1962 net sales.

In the Thursday, March 19, 1964 paper it was reported that the Cobb Hospital Authority had reaffirmed its decision to construct the new 150-bed South Cobb Hospital on a controversial 50-acre site at the intersection of Austell and Mulkey Roads, which currently is the location of WellStar Cobb Hospital. Members of the authority took action after listening to a lengthy statement from County Commissioner Herbert McCollum in which he branded as “cowardly” the charges stating that he had pressured the authority to approve the site earlier in the month. An over flow crowd of about 200 people turned out for the meeting and a large contingent from the Austell-Mableton area applauded loudly at times during the commissioner’s statement.

20 years ago …

A sleepover was reported in the Monday, March 14, 1994 MDJ as having turned deadly for an Austell sixth-grader when a friend pointed a pistol to the ground, fired a blank and then fired a second time at the boy, which killed him. The boy was pronounced dead at Cobb General Hospital in Austell after he was brought in with a gunshot wound to the neck. His friend was charged with murder, even though the victim’s father said that he believed it was an accident.

Two Cobb police detectives were reported in the Tuesday, March 15, 1994 paper as being taken off the Sara Tokars murder case for allegedly receiving money from a movie contract six months before the victim’s husband was charged with her murder. The detectives were placed on administrative leave for 10 days, pending the conclusion of an internal affairs investigation. The news came at a time when federal prosecutors were putting up their case against Fred Tokars at a trial in Birmingham, Ala., on money-laundering and racketeering charges. Tokars was also facing a death-penalty trial in Cobb Superior Court, where he was to be tried for murder, kidnapping and armed robbery in his wife’s November 1992 shotgun slaying.

In the Thursday, March 17, 1994 paper it was reported that representatives from the Atlanta-based Neighbors Network and the Cobb Citizens Coalition claimed that Cobb County was a hotbed for racist and neo-Nazi groups in Georgia. The groups also charged that the county commission had indirectly supported them through its anti-gay resolution and other public stances. The groups held a news conference in the Marietta Square to release a four-year study by the Neighbors Network that named Cobb as a “base for Nazi skinhead organizing.” The report detailed the activities of a number of current and former Cobb residents the Neighbors Network claimed were known Klan and anti-Semitic group sympathizers.

Another story that day reported that teens playing with matches in a wooded area near their home started a brush fire that burned 10 acres and threatened several homes near Harrison High School in west Cobb. It took 25 firefighters and 11 pieces of equipment to douse the fire that was fed by tinder-dry brush and driven by winds up to 30 miles per hour.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of March 13
by Damon_Poirier
March 14, 2014 10:35 AM | 198 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Southern Tech, a mayor’s stolen car, the Cobb Junior College, Cobb Hospital, the F-22 and a high-speed chase.

100 years ago …

In Friday, March 13, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported the Cobb Superior Court’s calendar of criminal cases. Among the list of misdemeanors and felony charges were two liquor cases, a stabbing, a gambling and a robbery.

50 years ago …

Mayor Howard Atherton’s administration was reported in Sunday, March 8, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal that he had a plan which may produce a windfall of $238,000 or more for Marietta’s financially-troubled city government. The windfall would be produced by reissuing at a lower interest rate more than $1 million in revenue certificates which were put out in 1959 by the Marietta Board of Lights and Water.

In the Wednesday, March 11, 1964 paper it was reported that the State Board of Regents had given its approval for construction of a library and a combined gym – auditorium at Marietta’s Southern Technical Institute, currently the Southern Polytechnic State University (SPSU). The formal okay on the two structures, which were estimated to cost $750,000, caught Southern Tech officials by surprise during the regents’ monthly meeting in Atlanta. The buildings were to be financed under Gov. Carl Sanders’ Master Plan for Education Bond Program. In all the regents gave their authorization for $71 million in work under the program which included buildings at every campus of the 21 universities and colleges in the state system.

Another story that day reported Acworth Mayor Mary McCall discovered her brand new 1964 Chevrolet was stolen. McCall, who had served several terms as Acworth’s chief executive, was making a speech at the Acworth School when the theft occurred. McCall said that a doctor’s bag belonging to her husband, which was in the car when it was stolen, was found north of Chattanooga, Tenn.

The County Board of Education and the City of Marietta were reported in the Thursday, March 12, 1964 paper as expecting to hold bond referendums in a move to provide funds for construction of the proposed new $2.35 million Cobb Junior College, which would eventually become Kennesaw State University. The county school board’s share of the construction costs would be $1,195,000 and the city’s would be $425,000. The request that the bond referendums be held on April 22 were revealed by Robert D. Fowler, chairman of the College Steering Committee, who presided at a Cobb Chamber of Commerce meeting attended by officials of the University System of Georgia and about 150 local politicians, business, civic and education leaders.

Also that day, the Cobb Hospital Authority had charged that it was pressured by County Commissioner Herbert McCollum into selecting a 56-acre tract on Austell Road as the site for the proposed new South Cobb Hospital, which currently is the location of WellStar Cobb Hospital. Members of the Authority made the allegation during a meeting with the South Cobb physicians and citizens. Their own choice, they said, had been a site at the intersection of South Cobb Drive and King Springs Road near Smyrna. Protests began to mount against the Austell Road and Mulkey Road site when the authority announced it as the proposed location of the new 150-bed hospital. The tract of land was being given to the county by Mableton Contractor Floyd Grainger.

20 years ago …

An Air Force report in the Tuesday, March 8, 1994 paper found problems with the stealth capability of the F-22 Advanced Tactical Fighter, a radar-evading jet to be assembled at Lockheed’s South Cobb Drive plant. Problems showed up several weeks earlier during a computer test of the F-22 design, according to the Air Force. A spokeswoman for the Air Force said the F-22 program director believed the problem could be fixed without affecting the plane’s development schedule or adding to its cost. The Air Force press release did not identify the specific problem areas, but a paper accompanying it said the computer found a problem with “smaller features of the plane rather than its overall design.” The Air Force paper expressed concerns about “the number of cracks, gap widths, panels, drain holes and doors on the aircraft.” Air Force officials also said they were concerned about radar-vulnerable areas around “air intakes, the radome, radar and engine [exhaust] nozzles.”

In the Thursday, March 10, 1994 paper it was reported that a 21-year-old Indiana man, who led Marietta Police on a 110-mph chase that damaged or destroyed seven cars – including one he struck head-on, was charged with 14 different offenses that included DUI, causing serious injury with a vehicle, reckless driving and car theft. The driver carried no identification, but was identified after police found a name stitched in a piece of his clothing. The high-speed chase went for about eight miles on northbound Cobb Parkway before crashing head-on into a car on state Highway 293.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of March 6
by Damon_Poirier
March 10, 2014 11:33 AM | 198 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a cave-in, a storm sewer flood, the Kennesaw junior college and a moonshine bust.

100 years ago …

In Friday, March 6, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported that a man held in the Cobb County Jail on charges of having robbed the N.C. and St. L. passenger train a short time ago was not guilty. But, letters received by Sheriff W.E. Swanson indicated that he was a well-known crook in other parts of the country. From all over the nation, Swanson received several photographs– some from the famous Pinkerton Detective Agency - that showed a resemblance to the accused and numerous letters that seemed to show beyond a shadow of a doubt that he was a “bad man.”

Also that week there was a story about the Marietta City Council renting the southern half of the building belonging to the Atlanta Northern Railway Company fronting on Church Street as the new fire department headquarters.

Another story reported the electric lights on the City of Marietta’s clock were a gift to the city from Third Ward Councilman J.R. Brumby Jr.

50 years ago …

Marietta Councilmen were reported in the Friday, Feb. 28, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal as being asked to approve name changes for 69 city streets in a move designed to eliminate duplication.

Also that day, there was a story that the Marietta City Council was being asked to enact a strict dog leash law. Ward Four Councilman John R. “Dick” Hunter authored the proposed ordinance, which would require that all dogs that are not inoculated, tagged and muzzled be either fenced in or leashed.

A construction worker was reported killed and another injured in the Sunday, March 1, 1964 paper when a newly dug sewerage line near Sedalia Park School collapsed and buried the men under seven feet of red clay for almost an hour. The men had been grading the seven-foot ditch, which was in close proximity to an already existing water line, in preparation to laying down the pipe when the caved in occurred.

In the Tuesday, March 3, 1964 paper, a storm sewer running under the Mableton Plaza Shopping Center, overtaxed by the continuous rains and “probably clogged at the lower end of the area,” erupted through the floor of a restaurant and flooded virtually all of the businesses in the center. Firemen from the South Cobb and Powder Springs fire districts, assisted by the Austell Civil Defense Unit, responded to the call for help from the merchants and worked into the night trying to keep the flood waters from merchandise within the stores. Water flooded into the stores from the restaurant until a jack hammer, provided by the county water department, was able to cut a concrete retaining wall that diverted the water out into a parking lot. Firemen said that the floor of the restaurant was “split from front to back” by the rushing water.

Another story that day reported that the State Board of Regents had selected a 100-acre tract east of the Pinetree Country Club as the site for the proposed new Cobb County Junior College, which is the current site of Kennesaw State University. The property, which would cost $100,000, was to be purchased and turned over to the Regents following a bond issue to be called by the City of Marietta and the Cobb County Board of Education. The proposed bond issue was expected to be twice the size of another junior college that had been recently approved by the Regents.

A fleeing suspect was reported in the Wednesday, March 4, 1964 paper as having run right into the arms of the law after he jumped from a car that contained over 100 gallons of illegal whiskey. An officer saw the man driving along Canton Highway and tried to pull alongside him, when the driver suddenly stopped on Barnes Mill Road and jumped out. The suspect ran in an almost complete circle from where he had abandoned the car, which had 102 gallons of moonshine broken down into 17 cases of 12 one-half gallon jars.

A roaring fire, whipped by high winds, was reported in the Thursday, March 5, 1964 paper as reducing the Shepherd Inn on Canton Highway near Woodstock to a pile of charred ashes. The Woodstock Fire Department was reportedly called by the owners, but did not respond because it was outside the city limits.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, March 1, 1994 MDJ, it was reported that Dobbins Air Reserve Base took another hit when the Pentagon announced 50,000 cuts nationwide in reserve units. The 116th at Dobbins was expected to lose three F-15 fighter jets and 40 Guardsmen later in the year. The cuts also affected two local Marine units. Marine Observation Squadron 4, which flew OV-10 reconnaissance planes based at Marine Air Group 42 at Naval Air Station-Atlanta, was to be deactivated at the end of the fiscal year. The Marines’ 4th Force Service Support Group, a non-flying administrative unit with headquarters in leased space adjacent to the Gresham Road post office in east Marietta, was also to be deactivated under the plan.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Feb. 27
by Damon_Poirier
March 03, 2014 11:05 AM | 195 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
This week’s Time Capsule looks at Civil War damages, a bank robbery, the Atherton’s Drug Store explosion, a gas pump fire and ham radios.
 
100 years ago …
 
In Friday, Feb. 27, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported that the claim of the Presbyterian church for $3,000 in damages against the government caused by Federal troops during the Civil War had successfully passed every stage and was in the hands of a Senate Committee. Col. Fred Morris, who represented the church, had been pushing the matter vigorously. In 1864, the church was badly damaged when it was used by soldiers as a field hospital.
 
Also that week there was a story about the early morning discovery that burglars had unsuccessfully tried blow open the vault of the Bank of Smyrna. The work was believed to be done by experts, but the bank vault was too strong for the charge and very little damage was done.
 
50 years ago …
 
In the Friday, Feb. 21, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal there was a story reporting that Dr. Herman E. Jones, director of the State Crime Laboratory, had concluded in a report presented to city officials that the Halloween night explosion at Atherton’s Drug Store on the Marietta Square was caused by a natural gas leak. The Jones report echoed the Marietta Fire Department’s report, which also blamed a leaking gas main. Read more about the Atherton’s Drug Store explosion here.
 
Three construction workers were also reported that day as being injured when scaffolding collapsed at the site of the new Atherton’s Drug Store. The men were placing masonry on a rear wall about 10-12 feet from the ground at the time of the accident.
 
The late Otis A. Brumby Sr., founder of the Cobb County Times and the first board chairman of Times-Journal Inc., was reported in the Sunday, Feb. 23, 1964 paper as being named to the Hall of Fame of the Georgia Press Association. Brumby, who died in 1953, was one of four newspapermen who received the distinction at the Georgia Press Institute held in Athens. A portrait of the nationally acclaimed publisher was to be placed in the Reading Room of the Henry Grady School of Journalism at Athens.
 
Another story that day reported that Admiral David L. McDonald, chief of Naval Operations, stressed the importance of military reserve training on a visit to the Naval Air Station in Marietta. He pointed out that reserve strength was more important to the nation than ever before. The native Georgian said with all the crises around the world that the United States “must have ready reserve forces” and “the reserves provide our residual strength.” 
 
In the Thursday, Feb. 27, 1964 paper it was reported that a gas pump at Reece Brothers Standard Oil station on Roswell Street burst into flames when a truck knocked it over. The truck, which was towing a 60-foot house trailer, was parked across from the station and the brakes apparently failed. The truck rolled across busy Roswell Street without mishap before knocking over the pump and severely damaging another. Sparks ignited the gasoline and fears that the three 1,100-gallon tanks underneath the pumps would explode. A fire truck was dispatched from a nearby Marietta Fire Department sub-station and extinguished the blaze.
 
A group of 18 Mariettans were also reported that day as having petitioned the City Council to do something about ham radio transmissions which repeatedly interfered with television reception on Hill Court, Mimosa Drive, Parkview Drive and Aviation Road. City Manager Walter Brown said the city had no authority in the radio field and probably would have to refer the matter to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The petition called for the city council to “do something about the invasion of privacy and nuisance created” by the radio transmissions.
 
20 years ago …
 
The long-standing plan to build a conference center on the grounds of the Marietta City Club was reported in the Monday, Feb. 21, 1994 MDJ as possibly being scuttled by new city council members – most of which favored using the property for a continuing education center instead. Although the city council had yet to formally take up the issue after nearly two months in office, a poll of the seven members revealed that at least four supported a change in plans.
 
In the Tuesday, Feb. 22, 1994 paper it was reported that as his stunned wife looked on, the body of a Dallas man who drowned in a private south Cobb lake was found at almost the same spot he was last seen. The man fell into G.B.’s Lake off Hicks Road near Smyrna. Cobb police divers found his body the next day in about six feet of water. Divers were hampered throughout the search by the murkiness of the water and by submerged tree limbs and other man-made debris such as metal and plastic plumbing pipes in the small lake. The victim was fishing with two others when his rented flat-bottom metal boat flipped over halfway across the lake.

 
 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Feb. 20
by Damon_Poirier
February 21, 2014 01:25 PM | 250 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a senator’s death, Leo Frank, a car chase, Naval Air Station-Atlanta and Northwest Georgia Health System.

100 years ago …

In Friday, Feb. 20, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported Georgia Senator Augustus O. Bacon died after a short illness that puzzled his physicians for several days. Just after it was announced that the trouble had been located and that it would “yield readily to medical treatment” Senator Bacon collapsed and died. The cause of death was believed to be a blood clot that entered his heart. The funeral services were held in the Senate Chamber in Washington and the body was brought to Atlanta where it was taken to the State Capitol to lie in state for four hours before being taken to Macon where it will be buried.

Also that week there was a story about Leo M. Frank, who was convicted of the murder of Mary Phagan of Marietta and sentenced to be hanged, was refused a new trial by the State Supreme Court. The court stood four against a new trial with two judges dissenting. Practically without exception Solicitor Hugh Dorsey was upheld on every point by the Superior Court.

50 years ago …

Lockheed’s StarLifter was reported in the Friday, Feb. 14, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal as having taken its second test flight and the landing gear of the huge C-141 was retracted for the first time.

Also that day, it was reported that the Navy’s top ranking officer, Admiral David L. McDonald, chief of Naval Operations, was scheduled to visit Marietta as a guest of Greater Atlanta Chapter of the Reserve Officers Association. Admiral McDonald was to arrive at the Naval Air Station in Marietta where he was to conduct a press conference immediately upon arrival and then attend a luncheon at the Marietta Country Club as a guest of the Marietta-Cobb County Council, Navy League.

In the Sunday, Feb. 16, 1964 paper it was reported a 110-mph car chase on the North 4-Lane (U.S. Highway 41) between Marietta Police and two wanted men ended in a three-car pile-up after the fleeing pair smashed a roadblock in Kennesaw. Marietta Police lieutenant Robert F. McBrayer suffered severe head and possible internal injuries in the crash and was listed in “critical condition” at Kennestone Hospital. His partner, Wyndall Black, who had just returned to work after being injured in the Atherton’s Drug Store explosion, was admitted to the hospital with head/ facial cuts and possible internal injuries. He was listed in “fair” condition.

Another story that day reported that a proposed constitutional amendment to abolish the office of coroner in Cobb County had been passed in the State Senate and was waiting on House action.

Type I Sabine oral polio vaccine was reported in the Wednesday, Feb. 19, 1964 paper as being available at the Cobb County Health Department. Health director Dr. Ernest Thompson said the vaccine would be dispensed free of charge.

20 years ago …

The state Environmental Protection Division was reported in the Thursday, Feb. 17, 1994 MDJ as threatening to fine Cobb County up to $60,000 a day for dumping an undetermined amount of silt into a north Cobb creek. The county reportedly failed to enforce erosion laws during the installation of a sewer line along Upper Allatoona Creek at Burnt Hickory Road near Acworth.

Also that day, it was reported that cutbacks in defense spending would leave Naval Air Station-Atlanta without aircraft in June 1994 and could result in the disbanding of its attack squadron. The twin-engine Grumman A-4 Intruder planes flown by the squadron were slated for retirement in June 1994 and there was no scheduled replacements. Deactivation of NAS-Atlanta’s attack squadron would affect 12 active-duty officers and 156 enlisted personnel, as well as 42 reserve officers and 128 enlisted reservists.

In the Friday, Feb. 18, 1994 paper reported that Cobb-based Northwest Georgia Health System was the state’s largest health-care provider, now that it has merged with two Cherokee County hospitals. R.T. Jones Hospital in Canton and Woodstock Hospital signed documents officially declaring their alliances with Northwest, which was based near Cobb Hospital and Medical Center off Austell Road.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Feb. 6
by Damon_Poirier
February 07, 2014 12:30 PM | 330 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a pony contest, robberies, arsonists, an Oakdale annexation, a Kennestone addition and Home Depot.

100 years ago …

In Friday, Feb. 6, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported that Cecil Hill, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R.A. Hill, won the pony and cart prize in a contest put on by the Marietta Journal, the Gem Theater, the W.A. Florence Department Store, Ms. Myrtice Allgood, T.W. Read and E.T. Gann. At least 150 boys and girls entered, but less than 20 made it to the end. Ballots, which were counted under the supervision of Jesse N. Gantt and James E. Dobbs over two days, represented several million votes. Ms. Hill, with 2,490,515 votes, won the light seal brown pony with a flaxen mane and a cart upholstered with gray cloth and a rattan backed seat. She reportedly named the pony “Florence” in honor of W.A. Florence.

Also that week there was a story about Marietta Mayor E.P. Dobbs having secured the consent of W.H. Benson, who was building a new garage on Atlanta Street, to widen the sidewalk at that point by three feet. The widened sidewalk would be twelve feet wide. Dobbs reportedly wanted to see the sidewalk widened all the way out to the Methodist Church.

50 years ago …

In the Friday, Jan. 31, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that a small, young man with long, neatly combed, blond hair held a cashier at gunpoint the day before as he robbed a Mableton grocery store of $1,388 and two cartons of cigarettes.

Another story that day reported burglars looted an upstairs safe at the Marietta Coca-Cola Bottling Co. for an estimated $8,000. City detective Bill Elliot said that entry was made through a back door. He also said that the safe was opened with a blow torch and appeared to be the work of professionals.

County fire masters were reported in the Sunday, Feb. 2, 1964 paper as seeking to meet with the Cobb Advisory Board to discuss the proposed changing of fire district names to numbers, which a larges South Cobb contingent opposed. The Advisory Board said the advantages of this change would be reduced rates of fire insurance, better protection and less confusion.

In the Monday, Feb. 3, 1964 paper, it was reported that a man on his way home from Dobbins Air force Base was surprised early the morning before when another man rose up from the floor board in the back seat of his car. The unexpected passenger told the driver to keep driving, but he drove through a fence near the base and jumped out of the car. When the driver looked back, he saw the unknown fellow driving off with his car down nearby railroad tracks.

The Concord Road covered bridge, a survivor of Sherman’s vandals, was reported in the Tuesday, Feb. 4, 1964 paper as having almost succumbed to modern day ones the night before. Arsonists tried to burn the bridge twice, but failed. A spokesman for the South Cobb No. 2 fire station said the first try was at 8:30 p.m. and only the gasoline, which was poured from end to end on the bridge, burned. The second attempt at 12:30 a.m. caused some of the wooden structure to ignite and suffer minor damage.

Also that day, residents of the Oakdale area were reported as studying the possibility of annexing into the City of Smyrna as a means of avoiding annexation into Atlanta. Tom Reed, president of the Lemons District Civic Club, confirmed plans for the study after inviting Smyrna Mayor George Kreeger and City Council to meet with his community’s citizens. The move started when an official of the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce said in a speech that his city would have to annex surrounding white areas to avoid becoming a pre-dominantly black city. A pending bill in the General Assembly, which would permit cities to annex adjoining property by act of council without consent of property owners, also added to the pressure.

A member of the Marietta Hospital Authority was reported in the Thursday, Feb. 6, 1964 paper as calling for construction of a 200-room addition to Kennestone Hospital in an effort to meet the increasing medical needs of the area. Dr. Robert P. Coggins, speaking to a meeting of the Early Bird Coffee Club on behalf of the Cobb County Medical Society, said that the proposed convalescent-diagnostic unit would relieve 200 beds at Kennestone for treatment of “acute” patients.

20 years ago …

In the Thursday, Feb. 3, 1994 MDJ, it was reported that Cobb County managed to keep Home Depot’s national headquarters in the county, but for a price. The county pledged more than $20 million in road projects to entice the company to relocate on a 43-acre tract at the northwest corner of Paces Ferry Road and Interstate 285. Cobb taxpayers were responsible for $1.3 million of the total $20 million. The most expensive project was a new interchange at Paces Ferry Road over I-285 costing between $15 and $18 million.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Jan. 23
by Damon_Poirier
January 23, 2014 10:20 AM | 368 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
This week’s Time Capsule looks at a train robbery, a restaurant raid, a bomb threat and a road block.
 
100 years ago …
 
In Friday, Jan. 23, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported a train robbery that happened on the previous Friday night aboard the N.C. and St. L. fast passenger train as it passed southward between Vinings and Bolton. Just after the train passed Vinings, the Pullman car conductor started through the train to make his report when he was confronted at the rear car door by a masked man with a black pistol. The robber ordered the passengers to the front of the car, made them give up their purses and took about $300. The robber then pulled the emergency brake cord, waited for the train to slow and then swung off the rear platform. The conductor rushed through the train and found a Fulton County policeman who was the only armed person aboard. Rushing to the rear platform, the officer fired at the robber but missed him in the dark.
 
Also that week there was a story about the United Daughters of the Confederacy celebrating the birthday of Robert E. Lee at the residence of Mrs. S.A. Anderson. A dozen Confederate veterans were present and during the social hour after the ladies program they talked about wartime scenes and memories. W.J. Manning was reported as saying that he had visited the Confederate museum in Richmond on several occasions and talked about the importance of preserving the war relics. He also spoke about a boyish Confederate soldier named Kirkland, who during a battle in freezing weather took five canteens of water to wounded Federals who were suffering from thirst and the cold.
 
50 years ago …
 
In the Friday, Jan. 17, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal, Cobb Rep. Bill Teague said he was introducing a bill in the General Assembly that would repeal Georgia’s controversial “Face Your Accuser Law.” The law had been under constant fire from grand juries and other groups for years. It provided that no state or county official could be indicated of wrong doing charges without first having an opportunity to appear before the grand jury with counsel and defense witnesses.
 
Marietta’s new city administration was reported in the Sunday, Jan. 19, 1964 paper as eying installation of electronic data processing equipment to speed up and cut costs of billing and accounting in City Hall and the city’s various government related agencies.
 
A third-grade student at the Pine Forest School was reported in the Monday, Jan. 20, 1964 paper as being struck by a car on Clay Street as he and his sister were on their way to school. The eight-year old boy was hospitalized with arm and rib fractures after he darted into the street and was hit by the car.
 
In the Tuesday, Jan. 21, 1964 paper it was reported that the State Health Department had agreed to make funds available in July for the construction of a new 150-bed hospital in Cobb County.
 
Also that day, it was reported that Sheriff’s deputies raided the recently opened Old Lamp Lighter Restaurant on the South 4-Lane (U.S. Highway 41) and arrested a woman for possessing an illegal amount of tax-paid whiskey and selling mixed drinks. Sheriff Kermit C. Sanders said that he had numerous complaints about mixed drinks being sold on the premises and the most recent ones were from local ministers.
 
A performance of “Who’s Been Sleeping In My Bed” was reported in the Wednesday, Jan. 22, 1964 paper as having halted for about 30 minutes as police and firemen searched the Cobb Theater for a non-existent bomb. B.A. Eddison, manager of the theater, told police a man called and said there was a bomb in the movie house around 8 p.m. and that it would explode in 15 minutes. Eddison initially ignored the call, but the man called back and asked him if he had searched the theater yet.
 
Cobb County, Marietta and Douglasville Police were reported in the Thursday, Jan. 23, 1964 paper as having teamed up to capture three men wanted for armed robbery in Alabama. Cobb Police received a call at 1 a.m. that the three suspects were traveling towards Cobb from Cressville, Ala. At 1:30 a.m., they received a call from a Dallas Police officer who was following them but afraid to stop the car. Cobb Police ordered a road block on Dallas Highway and turned a truck across the road stopping traffic.
 
20 years ago …
 
In the Tuesday, Jan. 18, 1994 MDJ a predicted ice storm waited until mid-morning to hit the county, but freezing rain and sleet quickly slicked roads that caused hundreds of wrecks. The icy precipitation, part of a storm that moved from Texas to Georgia during the night, caused treacherous driving conditions that paralyzed some areas of north Georgia. Police said it might take days to determine the number of accidents that happened during the storm. The following day, the Wednesday, Jan. 19 paper, reported that 177 accidents happened during the icy spell while an Arctic front blasted into the county and the wind chill dropped to -15 degrees. The next day, the Thursday, Jan. 20 paper, reported that a third of Cobb County’s school buses stalled in the cold.
 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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