12-year-old air-lifted after crash with bus
by Kim Isaza
October 26, 2012 07:33 AM | 10757 views | 11 11 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
(MDJ Photo / Kim Isaza)
(MDJ Photo / Kim Isaza)
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MARIETTA — A 12-year-old boy was airlifted to Scottish Rite Hospital early Friday after the Acura car in which he was a passenger was T-boned by a Marietta City school bus.

By early afternoon, Marietta Police reported the boy was in stable condition and not expected to worsen.

“The child has some fractured bones and internal bruising, but no head injury,” Marietta Police Officer David Baldwin said.

The crash happened at 7:15 a.m. Friday at North Marietta Parkway and Polk Street.

The Acura and the school bus were traveling in opposite directions on North Marietta Parkway. Baldwin said the Acura turned left onto Polk Street in front of the bus.

The Acura had a green light but not a green turning arrow, Baldwin said.

The bus, which was traveling south on the parkway, crashed into the front passenger side of the Acura, directly where the boy was sitting.

Police identified the Acura driver as Bhavani Saride, 36, of Smyrna, who will likely face charges, Baldwin said.

But the bus driver, Bonnie Banks, 57, of Mableton, helped lessen the impact of the crash, and the bus stayed upright.

“The school bus driver had full brake lock-up on the bus and attempted to swerve to the left to avoid impact with the car,” Baldwin said.

Marietta City Schools spokesman Thomas Algarin confirmed that the boy is a seventh-grader at Marietta Middle School.

Banks, the bus driver, and 13 students on the bus, which was bound for Marietta High School, were taken by ambulance and another bus to WellStar Kennestone Hospital with minor injuries, Baldwin said. There were 37 students on the bus at the time of the crash.

Algarin said Banks had only recently become a driver for Marietta City Schools but had driven Cobb County school buses for 18 years.

The vehicles were towed away about 8:30 a.m.

“We feel truly blessed and fortunate that all of our high school students are safe and sound, and we hope the Marietta Middle student makes a speedy and complete recovery,” Marietta High principal Leigh Colburn said. “Most of our students came back to school after they left the hospital. The bus driver, the police officers, and the emergency personnel at Kennestone all did a great job.”

On Friday afternoon, there was another crash involving a school bus in Cobb, though no one was taken to the hospital.

Cobb Police Officer Mike Bowman said that crash happened just after noon at North Booth Road and Bells Ferry Road. Two children complained of injury, but their parents were at the scene
Comments
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anonymous
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October 26, 2012
I don't mean to sound insensitive, but if the driver of the car lives in Smyrna, why is the son going to a Marietta City School. Am I missing something?
Tuition parent
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October 27, 2012
The student could be a tuition student or the parent could be a school system employee. Marietta accepts some students from outside the city if the student meets certain criteria and if the family is willing to pay the tuition. Marietta also allows system employees to bring their children to Marietta city schools. MHS has many tuition students who come in for different programs - IB, ROTC, and other programs - sports, arts, etc. I think Marietta accepts tuition students at all other schools as well. I know they do at MCAA, MSGA, MMS, and MHS because that has been our path and we are SO PLEASED with the education our students are getting.
Middle schooler
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October 27, 2012
OMG I know the kid it's so sad his name was sonny he was this Indian dude OMG that's so sad and like I know him and I feel like crying
anonymous
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October 26, 2012
So sad, I hope everyone recovers. This is a horrible intersection. Even though I realize the bus was going straight, I never know the law on who has the right of way if the bus was hypothetically turning right onto Polk. Does a green light trump the yield sign? The previous poster is right. If someone is traveling north towards 75 and is turning left onto Polk, they assume people turning right have to yield. Do they? I just don't see the purpose of the yield sign there. I know this doesn't involve this morning's accident, but does anyone know the law on this?
anonymous too
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October 27, 2012
I asked a Marietta Policeman that question once about that same intersection. He said that when you get into the turn lane you have a yield sign, not a green light. The oncoming traffic has the right away even if they are turning left. However, I live near that intersection and I always make sure the car with the yield sign stops before I turn in front of them.
anonymous
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October 26, 2012
Am I correct in understanding that the bus was coming from the north, making the right turn at the yield sign, and the woman was coming from the Krystal side, making the left onto Polk?

If so, this is one of those stupid right turn yield signs that cause so much trouble all over town. The left hand person believes the right hand turner is going to yield, but often times, the right hand turner still believes he has right of way...that's how it used to be. It's disconcerting every time I am confronted by one.
local parent
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October 26, 2012
My understanding is that the bus was coming from that direction but continuing across the intersection.....perhaps to turn right on Whitlock? The car driver is being charged so it was on her to yield, not the bus.

This is, however, one of those stupid yield signs. It was worse before the right turn lane was extended. I am left wondering if the light was turning yellow. That's another thing that's changed about driving in the past decade or so. Yellow used to mean slow down and let the left turners go. Now it means hurry up and get through the intersection. I didn't see this accident, but I've seen school busses full of students speed up to get to the other side. I've had to turn left on a red light because of it.....in order to clear the intersection myself. Yes, the mom should've waited to see what the bus was doing, but school bus drivers are pressured to keep on their schedule, maybe counting on luck to maintain them balance between safety and job security.
jjustice1016
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October 26, 2012
My daughter was in the first seat on this bus. The car turned left in front of the bus. The bus was going straight through the intersection and had a green light. The bus driver tried to slam on the brakes but could not avoid the collision. These children witnessed this boy's severe injuries. As far as I've heard all the kids injuries were minor. My daughter has a bruised cheek from hitting the back of the divider in front of her seat and also minor whiplash. Please keep everyone in your prayers, including the bus driver who was understandably very upset.
anonymous 2
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October 26, 2012
Anonymous,

Are you saying that a person turning right on a green light is supposed to yield to a person turning left on a green light (not a turn arrow)? If this is so, exactly when does someone turning right have the right a way? I thought the yield sign at a right turn meant to yield to someone who is already turning left when you reach the green light, or to people going straight when at a red light. If what you said is true, the people turning right NEVER have the right a way. In heavy traffic that person may literally never get to turn right.
anonymous41
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November 13, 2012
The Bus and car were traveling in opposite directions going towards each other on the green light. The Acura made a left hand turn on green in front of the Bus that was going straight. The Acura was in the wrong making a left turn in front of the Bus.

I pray that all involved in this accident a speedy recovery.
Take your time
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October 26, 2012
I hope and pray that young man is fine.

Parent's please take your time! I see people do this all of the time to save maybe a a minute?
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