Reclaiming your space: Tips create balance in homes with children
by Sally Litchfield
March 11, 2014 11:23 PM | 1911 views | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Home Renovator Kasie Boon spends some quality time with her daughters, 1-year-old Annie, and 4-year-old Lily Kate, as they exit the home playroom to find a hallway beaming with artwork from her youngsters on display.
Home Renovator Kasie Boon spends some quality time with her daughters, 1-year-old Annie, and 4-year-old Lily Kate, as they exit the home playroom to find a hallway beaming with artwork from her youngsters on display.
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Lily Kate Boon, 4, curls up with a good book on an antique refinished church pew in her parents family room in Marietta.
Lily Kate Boon, 4, curls up with a good book on an antique refinished church pew in her parents family room in Marietta.
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Children can change the way we live in our homes. Marietta resident Kasie Boon offers strategies to create a home that doesn’t scream “daycare.”

Boon and her husband, Taylor, renovated three of their own homes in Marietta. She has turned that hobby into a new venture called Red Door Property Ventures.

“I love finding houses in our community that are in need of a special touch to bring them to their full potential,” Boon said. “I love finishing a house renovation knowing we’ve improved even a tiny part of our community, and better yet seeing a family be able to make a long-term home out of it without the burden of a single project.”

When the couple welcomed their first daughter, Lily Kate, more than four years ago, they experienced the irony that every new parents encounters — the massive amount of “stuff” necessary for a child.

“Our previously adult spaces became flooded with oversized gear, more bright toys than I could count, and in our case, lots and lots of pink,” said Boon, who moved to the area from Austin, Texas, for her husband’s work. They also have another daughter, 1-year-old Annie.

“It was important for me make adjustments for the comfort of our children, but also to maintain some semblance of the home my husband and I had already created. We were here first, after all,” she said.

Four ways to create order, balance from chaos

Boon offers the following tips to create balance in a home that is blessed with children:

Separate but accommodate by creating dedicated zones in the home so that not every room is taken over with children’s things:

“Children will appreciate having a place of their own dedicated only to their belongings. A playroom is fantastic if space allows, but even a special corner, or a dedicated table or cabinet will do the trick. Accommodate the inevitable roaming toys in other rooms with a small basket for quick cleanup when you’d just like to turn on some post-bedtime DVR without a baby doll staring you down,” Boon said.

Turn the chaos into décor:

“Surrendering to an explosion of ‘kid stuff’ does no good for parent or child. Likewise, attempting to completely hide it all will lead to dysfunction and is near impossible anyway,” she said.

“Find a happy medium by allowing some favorite things to become part of your décor. Children’s books look wonderful displayed cover-forward on ledges. Take a set of alphabet flashcards and hang them in frames. Create a gallery wall of school art. Get your children involved in the process. They will love that their things are given some prominence and you will love to see it done well,” Boon said.

Get creative to maintain your style:

“Every family home needs to function for the children who grow up in it, but parents need not lose their style in the process. Choose a beautiful woven basket over a neon plastic bin for toy storage. Put your child’s latest painting in that antique frame you love instead of on the corkboard. The antique bread bowl I use as a dining table centerpiece now houses crayons ready for our little artist at any time. Function for them, style for you,” she said.

Set your boundaries:

“It’s perfectly OK to declare certain spaces in your home toy-free zones. It can be an entire room (in our house, my office), or the smallest of spaces (for me, the top half of the refrigerator — I just like it cleared),” Boon said.

“Remember, you welcomed your children into your home. Teaching your children to appreciate the spaces that are yours, and returning the favor by giving them spaces of their own, is a great way to instill respectful tendencies inside your home and beyond,” Boon said.

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