Pay-to-play is great ‘Deal’ for Georgia GOP elites
by Kevin Foley
November 08, 2013 12:09 AM | 1540 views | 6 6 comments | 35 35 recommendations | email to a friend | print
You thought we elected citizen legislators and send them to the Georgia State House to debate policy and make laws on our behalf.

Sorry, that’s not how things work in Gov. Nathan Deal’s pay-to-play administration. You pesky voters must take a back seat to the governor’s big campaign contributors who ante up and then get to sit on Hizzoner’s “competitiveness task force.”

These 21 special folks huddled with the governor last month under the guise of coming up with ways to pull Georgia out of the economic morass in which it’s languished since Deal took office in 2010. State unemployment remains stagnant at 8.7 percent, right where it was one year ago. And this year Georgia jumped from 15th nationally in food stamp recipients to sixth.

Deal’s task force members are corporate swells, real estate kingpins, big name lobbyists and wise guy lawyers, all hand-picked for their purported business acumen. Uninvited to Deal’s exclusive party are those annoying advocates for Georgia’s middle class and poor.

“It’s helpful for members of the General Assembly to hear their opinions,” Deal told a reporter. “They’re not bound by the opinions. But I think it’s important to have a group of outside individuals express their opinions and give them advice.”

You’ll never guess what advice Deal’s wealthy and influential “outside individuals” gave lawmakers so I’ll tell you: tax breaks for the wealthy and influential.

“It’s totally appropriate for the business community to advocate for tax breaks by themselves,” Alan Essig of the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute said in an interview. “The problem is when they are the judge and jury. And it seems the governor has given them the perceived power in making tax cuts. It’s the fox guarding the henhouse.”

These foxes have been calling the shots since 2011, yet Georgia is no more competitive today than it was then. If anything, the state is sliding backward while the rest of the country continues to recover from the disastrous Bush recession.

Deal hustled to claim credit this week after Site Selection, a trade magazine, chose Georgia as the best place to do business. “Right now what we are doing appears to be working,” bragged the governor.

Deal’s real report card says otherwise.

The state lost 333,400 jobs from December 2007 through February 2010, and has recovered only about half of them, resulting in a net loss of nearly 160,000 jobs through March 2013, according to Georgia Budget and Policy Institute figures.

We can conclude Deal’s competitive task force, like the governor himself, has accomplished little except advancing what is best for the state’s GOP fat cats.

To that end, the latest scheme concocted by Deal and Republicans in the legislature would replace Georgia’s personal and corporate income tax with sales tax rates as high as 14.5 percent.

In a state with a median household income of $47,000, the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute predicts their proposal could increase total taxes on up to 80 percent of Georgians. It also “changes the responsibility for funding state government by raising taxes on low- and middle-income people, dropping them for wealthy households and large corporations and making up the difference through deep budget cuts for schools, roads, hospitals and other ingredients of economic growth.”

Deal’s pay-to-play posse must be giddy over this idea.

“Such a radical tax shift … could raise the taxes of many small businesses and hurt the private sector in other ways, such as driving Georgia shoppers across state lines and shrinking the income consumers have to spend (locally),” warns the Institute.

Don’t want to pay more taxes? Tell Deal to listen to voices other than those coming from the special interests pumping cash into his re-election coffers.

Kevin Foley is a public relations executive, author and writer who lives in Kennesaw.
Comments
(6)
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Mike H
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November 09, 2013
Transferring the tax burden from the rich to the poor is a time honored Republican tradition, defending it is a job for their toadies and trolls.
Bob S
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November 08, 2013
OK - I'm the idiot. For the past year, I've been letting Kevin get under my skin. All the while you editors and publishers are laughing. He's bringing you readers and commenters - even though he knows his thoughts are as inane as anything Howard Dean or Joe Biden have ever uttered.

I realized that even Kevin can't believe his own writings when he says, "...the state is sliding backward while the country continues to recover from the disastrous Bush recession." How can you get so many un-truths in one phrase?

So I'll leave the Foley columns in the "unread" stack from now on. Enjoy your life - just don't waste my time.

Papermill gal
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November 08, 2013
Bob, never fear, we all fell into that same trap, i.e. actually thinking this column was something to logically argue with facts.

I rarely read it all the way through,skimming is enough. But I do believe it's up to all good patriots to respond and knock down his ridiculous talking points. Just think of the poor young people who might read his stuff and believe what he says (whose brain housing groups are yet undeveloped in baloney discernment). We owe it to them to give some logic below the madness. When it gets under your skin, don't let that BP rise...just remember Kev is a raging capitalist with a website touting his work for Coca-Cola and other big corporations, and owns or squats on a Montana retreat that rivals any CEO's. That puts him in the same category as Michael Moore.
anonymous
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November 08, 2013
Bob S. - We agree with the first sentence.
Dave G
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November 09, 2013
Bob realizing that you are an idiot is the first step toward recovery, but regressing into your FOX bubble is not the answer.
why not
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November 10, 2013
@Papermill gal

If you are a conservative why do you hate hypocrisy, free enterprise and job creators!
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