Other Voices: Positives outweigh negatives of move
by Bob Sabin
December 03, 2013 08:53 AM | 1103 views | 4 4 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
DEAR EDITOR: 

As a Tea Party supporter in almost every respect, I disagree with their position on the Braves moving to Cobb County.

I understand the philosophy of not looking for government/taxpayer funding of commercial enterprise. But a long term look into the future of Cobb County — particularly that part of the county — I think the benefits of the way the Braves will be supported is a win/win for all of us. There will be new hotels, eating establishments, shopping and many more commercial ventures that not only will revitalize an area that frankly, has been slipping, but will also bring millions of new tax dollars into the county annually.

Last week, an MDJ reader, David Stewart, wrote a letter saying that he will live too close to the stadium. My guess is that although he may not want to move, he may well see an improvement in his property value over the next few years. And that could have a similar effect for many, if not most, Cobb county property owners.

There is no guarantee that all Cobb residents will benefit, but I believe the positives will way outweigh the negatives of this move. 

Bob Sabin
 

Marietta 
Comments
(4)
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Chief Nok-a-Homa
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December 03, 2013
Sabin no has to turn over his secret tea party decoder ring.

Take a look at those properties around Turner Field if you want to know how locals in Cobb will fare.
Bob Sabin
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December 05, 2013
I guess I'm supposed to take from that comment that living near any stadium means your neighborhood is going to become a slum?

The neighborhood around Atlanta-Fulton County stadium was deteriorating in the 70's when I first started going to games. That's in an entire quarter of the city that changed due to "white flight." That is no longer a trend as shown by renovation in other areas of Atlanta and Cobb county that are seeing a renaissance.

As in other cities like Indianapolis, Denver, Charlotte and Tampa - neighborhoods around the large stadia have actually improved.
David Staples
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December 03, 2013
"My guess is that although he may not want to move, he may well see an improvement in his property value over the next few years."

How exactly is this a positive? The only time higher property values matter is if someone wants to sell. Thus, if an owner doesn't want to move, they will pay higher property taxes just because they want to continue living in the same place. Personally, I'm completely fine with my property valuation being a pretty constant number.
Bob Sabin
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December 05, 2013
MOST people buy a house because it is an investment that will be worth more when they go to sell. Otherwise, rent. If you want lower property taxes, support the Tea Party.
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