MDJ Time Capsule by Damon_Poirier
This week’s Time Capsule looks at Leo Frank, a train robbery trial, a murder, desegregation and the Walker School.
September 04, 2015 11:30 AM | 197948 views | 0 0 comments | 4179 4179 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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The Week of Sept. 3
by Damon_Poirier
September 04, 2015 11:30 AM | 24 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Leo Frank, a train robbery trial, a murder, desegregation and the Walker School.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Sept. 4, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier reported on the front page that the Grand Jury of Cobb Superior Court convened and took up the Leo M. Frank hanging. The Grand Jury was charged by Judge Patterson and many witnesses were subpoenaed. Solicitor E.H. Clay conducted the hearing.

♦♦♦

Another front page story reported that a man who had been in jail in Fulton and Cobb counties for about a year and a half and tried four times for a train robbery during that period was finally acquitted. The robbery was mentioned in my Jan. 23, 2014 column. The man’s first trial resulted in a conviction and so did the second, but because of an error in his charges, Judge Patterson granted a third trial which resulted in a mistrial.

♦♦♦

Rev. J.H. Hardy, 27, was reported in that edition as having died at Dr. Nolan’s sanitarium after lingering for a few days following an injury to his spine. The young minister, who had been principal of the Sandy Plains School for two years, became injured after running across the road in pursuit of a ball when he was struck by a car.

♦♦♦

Two fires were also reported in that paper.

The first was a fire that struck around 1 a.m. the Saturday before and completely destroyed the building occupied by the Smyrna Drug Store.

The second fire occurred between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. the Tuesday before and completely destroyed the four stall barn on the farm of W.J. Manning, which was two and a half miles from Marietta on Powder Springs Road. Property lost in the blaze “consisted of one mowing machine, one wagon bed, 650 bundles of fodder and other food stuff.” Damages were estimated at $250 and Manning was said to not have insurance.

♦♦♦

J.T. Anderson was reported as having completed a 200 ton concrete silo on his “large plantation” on Powder Springs Road along with a “large and well-designed barn.”

The reporter for the story described the some of the things they had seen at the barn. “One of the prettiest sights we ever saw was on the lower floor of this barn filled entirely with the finest registered Hereford breeding cattle in the State. The head of the herd, a bull of his own raising, Beau Rover, weighing 2,500 pounds and as big as a Hippopotamus is a sight worth traveling miles to see. ”

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Aug. 29, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that a 35-year-old estranged husband used a shotgun to kill a visitor of his wife’s late the Friday before in the kitchen of a house in Austell.

The following day, Monday, Aug. 30, 1965, it was reported that the 23-man August-September Grand Jury reconvened for the second half of its term and heard evidence in the murder case. The charge of murder was made against the Austell man in the killing of the 39-year-old victim from Atlanta. Deputy Sheriffs J.W. Reeves and Lewis Bell said the estranged husband shot the other man when he came to the home and found the victim talking to his wife in the kitchen.

Later in the week, on Tuesday, Aug. 31, 1965, it was reported that the murder victim’s body was stolen from a funeral home in Hapeville. Police were searching for the body taken from the casket while employees of the business were sleeping two rooms away.

♦♦♦

Also in the Monday, Aug. 30, 1965 paper, it was reported that the much amended desegregation plan of the Marietta Board of Education was expected to be approved later in the week by Washington. The news came from Loyd Cox, Marietta’s superintendent, who spent the entire Saturday before closeted with Health, Education and Welfare officials in Washington in an 11th hour attempt to reach an agreement on the plan.

In the next day’s paper, Tuesday, Aug. 31, 1965, it was reported that except for a bomb scare at Marietta High School the day before, Marietta City Schools were integrated quietly on the first day of the school year. Police searched the high school, which integrated for the first time in 1964 with two black students, but found nothing.

Principal George Griffin told police he had received a call after beginning to register students. A total of 1,190 students, including five black students, had registered at the high school.

W.H. Hamilton, principal of the Allgood Road and Banberry schools, said two black students had registered in the first grade at Allgood where a total of 375 students had registered. At Banberry, no black students had registered among the school’s 149 students.

♦♦♦

Marietta and Smyrna were reported in the Wednesday, Sept. 1, 1965 paper as playing host to 40-50 visitors from Saudi Arabia. The visitors were members of the Royal Saudi Arabian Air Force who were in Marietta for training in the operation and maintenance of the Lockheed-Georgia produced C-130 Hercules aircraft. The Saudi Arabian government had recently purchased some transports.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, Aug. 28, 1995 paper, it was reported that while recalling the conditions of a few years earlier – including cramped quarters, bare floors and leaky roofs – supporters of The Walker School celebrated the completion of the school’s $5.5 million construction and renovation project. More than 600 people attended the program in the new Coles Athletic Center, named for Great American Cookie Company founder/CEO Michael J. Coles and his wife, Donna. Gov. Zell Miller was the featured speaker for the event.

In addition to the gymnasium, the project included the construction of a building, which housed the campus’ Lower School, and renovation of the school’s older buildings. The school’s capital improvement campaign, Great Expectations, was coordinated by a committee chaired by Coles. Atlanta-based R.J. Griffin & Co. was the general contractor for the project.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Aug. 27
by Damon_Poirier
August 28, 2015 03:30 PM | 134 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Leo Frank, a pool, Lockheed, the ACLU and the anti-gay resolution.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Aug. 27, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier reported on the front page the verdict by coroner John A. Booth on the hanging of Leo M. Frank from a tree in a grove at Frey’s Gin on Roswell Road. The hanging of Frank was mentioned in last week’s column.

♦♦♦

It was also reported on the front page that 65-year-old Atlanta Police Capt. Zadock B. Moon died in Atlanta and was buried in Powder Springs. Capt. Moon, a 26-year veteran of the police force, was “prominent in fraternal societies and his funeral was conducted by the Moon Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Dallas.”

A delegation from Constantine Commandery of Knights Templar including J.M. Austin, E.I. Robertson, Homer Lewis, Allen Hardeman, C.E. Power and Edgar Nichols attended the funeral. Others attendees from Marietta included Mrs. A.S. Clay, Sheriff W.E. Swanson and Deputy George E. Hicks.

♦♦♦

A front page ad announcing the collection of a road tax at the Cobb County Commissioners office until Oct. 1. After that date, the public would have to pay their local tax collector.

♦♦♦

Another story in that edition reported the opening of the new Church Street swimming pool, which was mentioned in my Aug. 13 column. The concrete pool was enclosed by a high fence and benches. At the bottom end of the pool were dressing rooms and showers. Esther Maddox received the most votes in the contest to be the first one to enter the pool.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Aug. 22, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that Sen. Richard Russell said the Lockheed-Georgia Company was to be awarded a contract in excess $25 million to produce an unknown number of additional C-141 jet transports in addition to those that were scheduled at the time. The Marietta plant’s original StarLifter contract called for 132 planes to be produced locally.

♦♦♦

The world’s largest privately owned wind tunnel for testing aircraft design models was reported in the Monday, Aug. 23, 1965 paper as being built by Lockheed-Georgia Company at its Marietta plant. Besides being the biggest installation in the world, the new facility was unique in that it was to be designed for the handling of vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) and for short take-off and landing (STOL) aircraft as well as conventional low-speed testing modes.

The first section of the new facility had been designed with “outsized” dimensions to permit the test of V-STOL models in the transition region under full power with minimum interference of the walls and floor on the wake from the propulsion systems and on the air flow around the model. The second test section in the tandem setup was also larger than normal designs to permit the testing of models simulating full scale conditions for accurate low-speed drag evaluation and for determining aerodynamic data in the area up to and including maximum lift.

♦♦♦

A second story that day announced a settlement of nearly $300,000 had been reached by local authorities and insurance adjusters in a fire that gutted the Larry Bell Center several months earlier.

The five-member Larry Bell Park Board met with Commissioner Ernest Barrett and Marietta City Manager Walter Brown and agreed to accept the $297,654 settlement in the blaze which destroyed a major portion of the building. The structure was insured for $363,000 by J.F. Shaw Insurance, who represented American Casualty Insurance.

♦♦♦

Another story in that paper reported that the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) had come to the support of the Ku Klux Klan by urging Marietta city officials to grant the Klan’s request to hold a rally on the Marietta Square, which was mentioned in last week’s column. In a letter to Marietta Mayor Howard Atherton, the ACLU stated its position of supporting the rights of all groups to their constitutional freedoms, including the right of freedom of speech.

Later in the week, on Wednesday, Aug. 25, 1965, Atherton said the city “stands ready and willing to abide by the decision of the Justice Department” should it become involved in the city’s dispute with the Klan over the proposed rally. Atherton said he understood the Klan had complained to the Justice Department that the city would not allow the rally.

♦♦♦

The City of Marietta was reported in the Friday, Aug. 27, 1965 paper as filing a petition in Cobb Superior Court asking title to the historic park inside the Marietta Square be declared in the city. Such a court decree would have “the effect of severing and reversionary interests in the property by the heirs of John H. Glover, the first mayor of Marietta, and would give the city absolute title to the property.”

20 years ago …

In the Wednesday, Aug. 23, 1995 paper, it was reported that gay rights activists, including the half-sister of House Speaker Newt Gingrich and the daughter of Cobb Commission Chairman Bill Byrne, marked “the second anniversary of Cobb’s infamous anti-gay resolution” with calls for it to end. Candace Gingrich and Shannon Byrne headlined the group of six speakers at the commission meeting urging the board to rescind the resolution.

The story also stated that “a carnival-like atmosphere prevailed as a swarm of resolution opponents descended on the commission meeting.” The chamber was reported as overflowing and that about 20 opponents circled in front of the Cobb County Building carrying signs reading “Stop Fuhrer Byrne” and chanting slogans like “Wysong, so wrong,” which referred to Cobb Commissioner Gordon Wysong.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Aug. 20
by Damon_Poirier
August 21, 2015 12:00 PM | 220 views | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Leo Frank, Six Flags, the Beatles and Promina Health System.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Aug. 20, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier reported on the front page that Leo M. Frank was found hanged from a tree in a grove at Frey’s Gin on Roswell Road. The story reported that the “parties who hanged him are unknown. All kinds of wild rumors have been spread over the country regarding the size of the mob and the manner in which they worked.”

The article reported that a reporter from the paper was “the first newspaper man to see the dead body” and “together with the special correspondent of the Associated Press has endeavored to give the world the facts in the case.” It was reported that “not a shot was fired into the body nor was there any wound of any kind inflicted” by those who were responsible.

A second story on the front reported the coroner John A. Booth empanelled a jury to investigate the death of Frank.

For more on the 100th anniversary of the Leo Frank case, check out Michelle Babcock’s Aug. 15 Marietta visited by ghosts of Leo Frank; and her Aug. 17 stories Seeking justice: Southern Museum unveils Leo Frank exhibit with event and Rabbi calls for exoneration of Leo Frank.

♦♦♦

Another story in that week’s edition reported that Marietta Mayor E.P. Dobbs had received a proposal to pave the Marietta square with brick at a cost of $1 a yard. The area to be paved was estimated at about 11,000 yards.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Aug. 15, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that the Marietta City Council had decided to stand by a city ordinance prohibiting any political gatherings in the Marietta square and reject the Ku Klux Klan’s second request to hold a rally on the square. As with their initial request, which was in last week’s column, the city council cited heavy traffic as the main reason for prohibiting a meeting in the park.

Marietta Mayor Howard Atherton said the streets bounding the square were at the time handling traffic beyond their capacity. A total of 41,385 cars were said to be using the streets designed to take care of a maximum of 15,000 vehicles.

In the following day’s paper, Monday, Aug. 16, 1965 paper, it was reported that the refusal of the Ku Klux Klan rally on the Marietta Square was met with approval from a Klan chaplain and several spectators at a Ladies of the Ku Klux Klan of America rally held at Twin Lakes off Powder Springs Road. The chaplain, who identified himself only as “Rev. Williams,” said he felt Larry Bell Park was a more suitable place because of its parking facilities and grounds.

♦♦♦

Plans for a $400 million industrial park and amusement center, now known as Six Flags Over Georgia, were announced in the Tuesday, Aug. 17, 1965 paper by Great Southwest Corp. in Dallas, Texas. The center was to be developed in Atlanta, just across the Chattahoochee River from the southern tip of Cobb County.

Texas millionaire Angus G. Wynn Jr. and Georgia Gov. Carl Sanders and some 50 others Georgians toured the famed Six Flags Over Texas amusement park, which was owned by Great Southwest Corp. Wynn said the Texas park, located in the Great Southwest’s industrial center between Dallas and Fort Worth, at the time attracted 1.4 million visitors a year. He said the Georgia site would be constructed along similar lines.

♦♦♦

Sand blasters were reported in the in Wednesday, Aug. 18, 1965 paper as working on the nationally-famous Birney Memorial at Marietta High School after vandals painted obscenities in gray enamel paint on the marble arch. Loyd Cox, the superintendent of Marietta schools, suspected that the vandalism was the work of local students.

♦♦♦

In the Aug. 19, 1965 paper, MDJ reporter Ruth Schuster, mother of current Cobb Superior Court Judge Stephen Schuster, reported on the historic one and only Beatles concert in Atlanta which took place at the old Fulton County Stadium.

For more on the Atlanta concert, check out Joe Kirby’s Aug. 19 column.

20 years ago …

As legislators bickered over potential congressional maps, state Sen. Chuck Clay was reported in the Tuesday, Aug. 15, 1995 paper, as having quietly built support for his own offering which would protect Cobb while obliterating the boundaries of the then-11th District. The veteran Marietta Republican, Cobb’s only member on either the House or Senate redistricting panels, introduced a map that he felt could pass the Senate with some minor adjustments. Passed around the Senate floor, the clay plan drew support from both Democratic and Republican members.

♦♦♦

In a legal decision that would have statewide ramifications the Georgia Court of Appeals was reported in the Wednesday, Aug. 16, 1995 paper as having held that the giant health care alliances that managed Cobb County’s three largest hospitals had to open their meetings and records to the public.

A three-judge panel on the appeals court unanimously ruled that Promina Health System and its Cobb-based subsidiary, Northwest Georgia Health System, became “vehicles” for the operation of public hospital authorities and therefore were subject to Georgia’s open meetings and open records laws. The ruling by Presiding Judge William Leroy McMurray Jr. and Judges G. Alan Blackburn and Gary B. Andrews affirmed a Feb. 10 decision by then-Superior Court Judge Harris Hines.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Aug. 13
by Damon_Poirier
August 14, 2015 03:15 PM | 340 views | 0 0 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a pool, a nuke lab, UFOs, desegregation and 600-year-old bones.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Aug. 13, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier reported Pierre Camblos and J.H. Brumby were building “a first-class swimming pool on Church Street.” The pool was to be “55 feet long and 21 feet wide with a smooth concrete floor, dressing-rooms, hot and cold shower baths and plenty of towels.”

Tickets were being sold at all of the local drug stores for the opening night and “a system of voting for the most popular young lady” had been arranged. The “young lady receiving the most votes” was to select her “swimming partner and be the first ones to enter the crystal water.”

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Aug. 8, 1965 paper, it was reported that the three-month old German Shepherd puppy belonging to Mrs. Rodney Beckler of Marietta fell into a 25-foot well while visiting the Carl Balding family on Pine Road.

The Fullers Fire Department was called to make the rescue, but before the team arrived Mrs. Beckler jumped into the well, located beneath the house, to save the puppy. Both “Lynn” the puppy and the 18-year-old woman were lifted to safety unharmed by the fire department.

♦♦♦

Also that day, it was reported that the Lockheed-Georgia Company in Marietta had submitted the high bid for the nuclear laboratory at Dawsonville. Lockheed reportedly offered $1.2 million for the laboratory, the nuclear reactor and 9,890 acres of land.

Until the property was recently declared as surplus, Lockheed-Georgia had operated the laboratory under a leasing arrangement for the U.S. Air Force.

♦♦♦

Sen. Richard Russell was reported in the Monday, Aug. 9, 1965 paper as having thrown his influential backing behind a proposal to establish Fort Stewart as one of the country’s centers for helicopter warfare. The lawmaker promised to “do what I can” to convince the Defense Department that the south Georgia installation was ideally suited for a big helicopter training program.

The idea was first urged in a letter that week from Rep. L. Mendel Rivers, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, to Defense Secretary Robert McNamara. The Congressman pointed out that helicopters were being used extensively by U.S. troops in the fighting in Vietnam and with the doubling of the draft that even more training facilities in this field were needed.

♦♦♦

In the Tuesday, Aug. 10, 1965 paper, it was reported on the front page that two young girls were watching television at 1:30 a.m. the Sunday before when they were disturbed by “a very loud noise sounding something like ‘oooooo.’” The house reportedly shook and the television went on the blink.

About 10 minutes later, the girls said their dog started barking and they heard “a loud beep-beep noise.” Looking outside, the girls claimed to have seen “red, blue and white lights in the pasture across the street.” The girls were frightened and looked away. When they looked back several minutes later, the lights and noise had disappeared.

♦♦♦

Capt. William E. Carver, U.S. Navy, was reported in the Wednesday, Aug. 11, 1965 paper as having been named commanding officer of Naval Air Station Atlanta in Marietta and would relieve Capt. Jack N. Durio, U.S. Navy, on Aug. 29.

♦♦♦

Also that day, it was reported that a representative of the Cobb Humane Society told the Board of Commissioners a discrepancy existed in the records kept by Emory University and the county pound over the number of dogs delivered there for medical research.

Herman L. Fellton, a member of the society’s board of directors, said the pound, over a period of several months, reported 254 dogs which the school had no record of ever receiving. According to Fellton, the society was concerned over the discrepancy because trailers equipped to carry a large number of dogs had been reported in the area.

♦♦♦

The Ku Klux Klan was reported in the Thursday, Aug. 19, 1965 paper as having repeated its request to the Marietta mayor and city council to hold a rally on the Marietta Square and threatened to contact the Justice Department if the request was denied. The original request, which was mentioned in last week’s column, was for a gathering of about 300 people. The Marietta City Council denied permission for the rally and also passed an ordinance prohibiting the use of the Square for any political gathering.

In a letter to Mayor Howard Atherton, Calvin Craig, the Grand Dragon of the Georgia Klan, said civil rights laws now gave “every American the right to use public property, including the square in Marietta.” Craig also quoted a federal law which he stated, “That any official who conspires to deny any citizen their Constitutional rights of Freedom of Speech and the right of peaceful assembly shall be in violation of the Constitution and be subject to a Federal penalty for same.”

♦♦♦

The third revision of the Marietta public schools desegregation plan was reported in the Friday, Aug. 13, 1965 paper as having been approved by the city Board of Education and was resubmitted to the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare officials in Atlanta by Superintendent Loyd Cox.

Major changes in the second desegregation plan were that the third grad would be included in the grades which would be desegregated in the fall and all grades would be desegregated during the 1966-67 school term. Previously only grades 1,2, 8, 11 and 12 were to be desegregated this fall and the Marietta school system had until the 1967-68 term to implement the plan in all grades.

♦♦♦

Also that day, a Lockheed C-141 StarLifter, the then-newest all-jet troop-cargo transport in the U.S. Air Force’s Military Air Transport Service, landed in South Vietnam on Aug. 5, inaugurating the start of C-141 operations into the southeastern Asia trouble spot. By early October 1965, MATS airlift officials expected to have C-141s operating in Vietnam on a daily basis.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, Aug. 8, 1995 paper, it was reported that human remains dating back at least 600 years had been found on a 60-acre construction site in Canton. Garrow & Associates were excavating the site for developer JDN Realty, which planned on building a 126,000-square foot Wal-Mart SuperStore and four or more buildings with 400,000 square feet of retail area.

The bodies dated back to the two prehistoric occupations, 200-400 A.D. and 1,200-1,350 A.D., and were found in a 10-acre excavation site on the property. Archaeologists at the time were not able to determine what kind of cultural affiliation the bodies had because of the time period, but would study them for about a year before turning them over intact to the proper authorities.

The two Native American tribes in the area at those two time periods were Creek and Cherokee.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Aug. 6
by Damon_Poirier
August 07, 2015 02:45 PM | 442 views | 0 0 comments | 32 32 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at raids, integration, the Blue Ridge Parkway and the Olympic torch.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Aug. 6, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier reported on the front page that local authorities raided a “blind tiger” or still at a home within the city of Marietta and six quarts of liquor and a keg of beer were confiscated.

50 years ago …

In the Friday, July 30, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that a lottery raid on a Little Street apartment resulted in the arrest of an Atlanta man who was booked into the Cobb County jail and released under a $5,000 bond. Cobb County Deputies E.E. Brumbelow and Charlie D. Johnson were among members of the Atlanta Metropolitan Lottery Squad that made the arrest.

The accused was apprehended as he was going down the backstairs of his apartment. Initially, he did not initially resist arrest but later ran from detectives and tried to ignite sheets of flash paper that he had on his person. An Atlanta detective caught the man before he could set the papers on fire which contained lists of bets. Inside the man’s apartment, officers found pads, pencils, sheets of flash paper – two of which had recorded bets, and a short wave radio.

♦♦♦

Forty-four black students were reported in the Sunday, Aug. 1, 1965 paper as having been accepted in seven previously all-white schools in Cobb County for the coming school year. Notifications of acceptance were sent to the parents of the children, who would be mostly entering junior high school or high school. Two of the children were going into the first grade.

The students were being accepted into Cobb schools in accordance with an Integration Plan approved by the Federal government. Under the plan, Cobb was to integrate the first, eighth, ninth, 10th, 11th and 12th grades.

Only one application was reported as being turned down and it was for a grade that was not part of the integration plan.

Meanwhile, the Marietta school system announced that it had not yet processed or counted the applications for transfer by black students.

♦♦♦

Also in that day’s paper, it was reported that the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park had been chosen as the southern terminus of a proposed $72.7 million extension of the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Later in the week, on Friday, Aug. 6, 1965, it was reported that there would be no Congressional action for the year on the proposed extension of the Blue Ridge Parkway from North Carolina to an undetermined point near Marietta or Cartersville. It was also reported that the acquisition of the rights of way along a Cartersville corridor would be less costly.

♦♦♦

On the front page of the Monday, Aug. 2, 1965 paper, there was a picture of William V. Edwards of Smyrna battling to control a car fire on South Cobb Drive at Brown Court in Smyrna. Bystanders were quoted as saying that gasoline leaking from the carburetor of the car owned a Smyrna couple dropped onto the manifold and ignited.

Edwards was said to have fought the fire, trying to smother it with a coat until Smyrna firefighters arrived. The fire apparently burned for 10 to 15 minutes before firefighters arrived and heavily damaged the front end of the car.

♦♦♦

In the Thursday, Aug. 5, 1965 paper, it was reported that at a special meeting, the Marietta City Council denied the Ku Klux Klan permission to hold a rally on the Marietta Square for later in the month. The council also passed an ordinance prohibiting the use of the Square for any political gathering.

Mayor Howard Atherton said in a letter dated July 7, 1965 that Calvin Craig, the Grand Dragon of the Georgia Ku Klux Klan, had requested permission to hold the rally. Atherton replied, before the council could make a decision on the matter, that they needed to know how many people would attend the gathering. Craig answered him on July 12 and said the Klan expected approximately 300 people “depending on the weather.” Craig also said that if the rally was permitted, the Klan would “like the mayor or some other city official to be a guest speaker at the meeting.”

The mayor and city council cited two reasons for denying permission. The first was that “the heavy traffic volume that congests public areas of the square” and “the desire of this body to continue the public peace and harmony we have enjoyed during these troubled times.”

♦♦♦

Also that day, it was reported that residents of the Sope Creek area near lower Roswell Road were complaining that the creek caused the neighborhood to smell like a garbage dump. The cause of the odor was determined to be sewage from a chicken processing plant on Wallace Road.

20 years ago …

The preliminary route for the Olympic torch was reported in the Thursday, July 27, 1995 paper by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games and did not include Cobb County as one of the more than 80 counties and 160 cities in Georgia. Local officials did not seem surprised by the snub. ACOG and Cobb had been at odds for more than a year over the commission’s resolution condemning gay lifestyles as incompatible with Cobb’s community standards.

Gay activists seized on the issue, threatening massive protests if Olympic volleyball wasn’t moved from the county-owned Cobb Galleria Centre. ACOG urged commissioners to quell the controversy, but when commissioners refused to rescind the resolution ACOG shifted volleyball from Cobb to Athens.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of July 23
by Damon_Poirier
July 21, 2015 10:50 AM | 601 views | 0 0 comments | 43 43 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Leo Frank, a potential Lockheed strike, a drive-by shooting and a fatal car wreck.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, July 23, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier reported Leo M. Frank’ throat was cut by life-term convict William Creen at the State Farm in Milledgeville. The wound was “immediately sewn up by doctors who happened to be close at hand.”

Creen was reported as having “slipped a big butcher knife into his sleeping quarters and when the lights were turned low he stole over to where Frank was sleeping and slashed his throat.” Prison guards were said to have caught Creen before he had time to kill Frank.

♦♦♦

A second story announced that a local 67-year old man was killed by a fast passenger train on the W. & A. Railroad at the crossing near the old Gober marble yard. The man was “absorbed in counting a hand full of money when the engine struck him and threw him with a great force from the track.” While the man’s body was not mangled, his “neck and all his limbs were broken.”

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, July 18, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that officials of the 12,000-member Lockheed-Georgia Company’s local 709 of International Association of Machinists (IAM) had called for a mass membership meeting to discuss contract negotiations and the possibility of a strike vote.

The following day, Monday, July 19, 1965, reported that members voted overwhelmingly to authorize union leaders to call a strike against the company if negotiations for a new contract failed. H.B. Savage, vice president of Local 709, said that 97 percent of the approximately 8,000 workers voting at Sprayberry High School approved the strike authorization that was asked for by union leaders.

Later in the week, on Sunday, July 25, 1965, sources close to the bargaining sessions between union leaders and the company predicted that an agreement on a new contract would be reached before a meeting of union members was held. Reports of a possible contract settlement came the day before following three lengthy sessions during the week between the two at the offices of the Federal Mediation Service in Atlanta.

♦♦♦

With President Lyndon B. Johnson symbolizing the nation’s sorrow, former Governor and UN Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson – whose death was mentioned in last week’s column – was buried in the Illinois prairie that he loved. President Johnson was reported in the Monday, July 19, 1965 paper as leading a band of dignitaries who attend the “simple, 40-minute services in the small, red brick Bloomington Unitarian Church and then watched the burial in the century-old Evergreen Memorial Cemetery.”

♦♦♦

The Smyrna City Council was reported in the Wednesday, July 21, 1965 paper as having asked Cobb Commission Chairman Ernest Barrett to help get an exit ramp from the I-285 Perimeter Highway to Spring Road on the west side of the Four Lane, which is now known as U.S. Highway 41, where the three roads intersect just south of Marietta. Motorists at the time had to come off I-285 on the east side of the Four Lane and cross the entire width of that road to get to Spring Road.

Barrett said that as soon as he received the resolution he would go to the State Highway Department and request the construction of the ramp. He also said the current layout of the area would allow the installation of the ramp at little cost and trouble.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, July 17, 1995 paper, it was reported that Cobb County police were still searching for suspects in the drive-by shooting of a Florida father and his son on Interstate 285 near Vinings, which was mentioned in last week’s column.

The wounded 13-year-old boy told reporters the Saturday before that he feared “knowing they’re still out there.” The young boy spoke to reporters from a wheelchair in a parking lot near then-Promina Kennestone Hospital, where his 38-year-old father remained hospitalized for a gunshot wound to his lower right leg.

The following day, Tuesday, July 18, 1995, it was reported that police had identified one of the four suspects wanted in connection with the shooting and were seeking arrest warrants against the three others. Police identified a 19-year-old black man from southwest Atlanta as being “on the run” and was considered armed and dangerous. He was also said to have made threats that he would shoot police officers if cornered.

Then, on Wednesday, July 19, 1995, the 19-year suspected triggerman in the shooting surrendered in Atlanta with his lawyer.

♦♦♦

Georgia Christian Coalition Chairman Pat Gartland was reported in the Wednesday, July 19, 1995 paper as having resigned his post atop one of Georgia’s most influential advocacy groups to join the presidential campaign of Texas Sen. Phil Gramm.

Gartland, then-51, was the latest Georgia big name to join Sen. Gramm’s bid for the Republican nomination in 1996. Sen. Gramm, a Columbus-native, had at the time endorsements from the majority of Georgia’s congressional delegation and numerous political and business leaders in the state.

♦♦♦

In the Saturday, July 22, 1995 paper, it was reported that five people were killed in a two-car accident on I-75 near the Cobb-Cherokee line that catapulted one car into the air and onto the roof of another.

The Georgia State Patrol and Cherokee County officers said a late-model Toyota driven southbound on the interstate shortly before 3 p.m. the day before went out of control, veered off the road, through a grass median and hit a metal guardrail on the northbound side. The impact flipped the Toyota into the air upside down where it then landed atop a Plymouth Acclaim going north between Wade Green Road and Georgia Highway 92 at the Priest Road overpass. The State Patrol also reported that all five victims suffered massive head injuries.

The incident closed northbound I-75 for about two hours and the resulting traffic jam extended as far as 12 miles to the south on the interstate. Mike Oliver of Traffic Scan Inc., a traffic reporter for STAR 94 FM, said in his four years as an Atlanta traffic reporter that he had never seen a Friday traffic jam that bad.

The following day, Sunday, July 23, 1995, it was reported that the only survivor of the crash, a 10-year-old boy from Henderson, Kentucky, was cleared to go home from Promina Kennestone Hospital. The boy suffered a broken collarbone and cuts on his face from flying glass.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of July 16
by Damon_Poirier
July 17, 2015 12:00 PM | 648 views | 0 0 comments | 48 48 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at the Clark Library, Adlai E. Stevenson, Dobbins, Mars, a bomb threat and a shooting.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, July 16, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier reported that Marietta resident Gov. Joe M. Brown was among those who addressed the House and Senate’s Western & Atlantic committees opposing any move to prevent the construction of a road paralleling the Western & Atlantic Railroad.

♦♦♦

A second story announced that Frances Crosby Ward, Lena Rivers Giles, Louise Land, Roberta Roberts Rainey, Lorene Duncan, Sarah Frances Martin, Mary Sue Hicks, Herbert Clay Jr., Kingsley Miller, Austin Spence, Tony Carter and Roy Swanson were winners of the dolls in the “Closing Out Sale” for the Henry A. Ward Co. that were mentioned in last week’s column.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, July 11, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that the sale of Marietta’s Clark Library, which was also mentioned in last week’s column, was postponed by the Marietta City Council at the request of a committee from the First Baptist Church.

Joe Kelly, spokesman for the committee, said the church was interested in buying the property, but it did not have the time to take the proper action and make a formal bid. Kelly said that the church had only become aware of the sale two days before and needed a month to get a bid in order.

Marietta Mayor Howard Atherton said that the city was not in a hurry to sell the library and decided to entertain proposals for the building after a good offer was made.

♦♦♦

The death of former Governor and UN Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson, a two-time Democratic presidential candidate was reported in the Wednesday, July 11, 1965 paper. Stevenson collapsed in a London street and died of an apparent heart attack at the age of 65.

Stevenson, chief U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, was in London on a private visit. He was passing the International Sportsman’s Club on Upper Grosvenor Street in Mayfair near the U.S. Embassy when he collapsed. He was taken by ambulance to St. George’s Hospital near Buckingham Palace where he was later pronounced dead.

♦♦♦

Rep. John Davis was reported in the Thursday, July 16, 1965 paper as pledging his support to a City of Marietta-Cobb County bid to convert Dobbins Air Force Base into a joint military-civilian airport. But, the Congressman added that the feared the success of the bid was slim.

Davis reported that the same proposal was brought to the Federal Aviation Agency two years earlier and it quickly ran head-on into opposition from just about every official involved. He also said that the Navy, the Air Force and the Lockheed-Georgia Company all claimed that the civilian use of Dobbins would interfere with their operations.

♦♦♦

In the Wednesday, July 15, 2015 paper MDJ reporter Hilary Butschek reported on the historic flyby of the New Horizons spacecraft past Pluto after an epic journey from Earth that spanned more than three billion miles and 9½ years. Fifty years ago, in the Friday, July 16, 1965 paper, a similar historic space encounter was reported, this one with one of our closest solar system neighbors - Mars.

U.S. scientists celebrated the first close up pictures which showed a bright desert area and the edge of the mysterious planet. The first image gave no hint as to the Martian terrain, but roughly 20 others were on their way from the Mariner 4 spacecraft and were expected to reveal more features.

The initial photograph, taken by the spacecraft in its fly-by of the planet, took eight hours and 35 minutes to transmit back to tracking stations on Earth. The photo, taken from a distance of about 10,000 miles about Mars, showed features about three miles in length.

20 years ago …

Officers with three local agencies were reported in the Tuesday, July 11, 1995 paper as having searched for more than an hour for two packages containing bombs that a caller claimed were placed outside the Cobb County Justice Center in downtown Marietta. No packages were discovered at the court buildings, which were evacuated along with adjacent buildings just east of the Marietta Square.

The threat was called into 911 by a male on a cellphone just after lunchtime. Officers with Marietta Police, Cobb County Sheriff’s and the Marietta Fire departments searched outside the buildings amongst the shrubs and automobiles as oblivious lunchtime pedestrians walked past them.

♦♦♦

In the Friday, July 14, 1995 paper and for several days afterwards, the MDJ reported on the shooting of a Tennessee man and his 12-year-old son. The pair were shot after two black men in a green, late-model Jeep Wrangler fired four shots into their southbound Winnebago on Interstate 285 in Cobb County before speeding away.

The father was taken to Kennestone Hospital where he underwent surgery for a gunshot wound to the lower right leg. His son, who was shot in the right thigh and in the abdomen, was admitted to Scottish Rite Children’s Hospital in Atlanta.

The following day, it was reported that the search was still on for the suspects. However, the Jeep Wrangler, which had been stolen from Cumberland Mall’s parking lot shortly before the shooting, was found in a heavily wooded area off Bouldercrest Road in DeKalb County.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of July 9
by Damon_Poirier
July 10, 2015 12:45 PM | 719 views | 0 0 comments | 52 52 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Mary Phagan, Kiwanis International, the Clark Library, the Fowler-Marland House and the East-West Connector.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, July 9, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier reported that a large crowd attended the unveiling of the monument erected to 13-year old Mary Phagan, the murder victim in the now infamous Leo Frank case, in the Marietta City Cemetery by the Marietta Camp United Confederate Veterans (U.C.V.) 762.

The unveiling was made by James Sauls, a crippled veteran who was a soldier for four years in the Civil War. Retiring U.C.V. Commander J. Gid Morris was the master of ceremonies and introduced the speakers. Henry Boyd Moss made the formal eulogy for the slain girl, Rev. A.C. Hendley of East Point made a brief address, U.C.V. Chaplain Gazaway Hames made the opening invocation and Dr. Rembert Smith closed with a prayer and benediction.

For more information on the 100th anniversary of the murder and the later lynching of Frank, check out the Sunday, April 28, 2013 story by MDJ News Editor Leo Hohmann – A Pilgrimage for ‘little Mary’ here.

♦♦♦

The entire front page of that edition was taken up with the “Closing Out Sale” ad for the Henry A. Ward Co., which stated that the store would be giving away four 2½-foot tall dolls that normal retailed for $5.

Each newspaper had an individual number stamped underneath the image of a doll. In order to win one of the four free dolls, participants had to bring the full page ad with them to the store and have their number be closest to the numbers on each of the dolls.

♦♦♦

Another story in that edition reported that J.W. Hancock was beginning work on a building upon his Ice Plant property for a modern steam laundry plant. The Journal had learned that J.H. Porter, “an experienced laundry man,” who was “engaged in the business in another city,” would be associated with Hancock.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, July 4, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that Marietta Mayor Howard Atherton said the State Highway Department would probably take “contracts for the widening of Fairground Street sometime in September.”

Plans were to widen Fairground from Roswell Street north to the Four Lane, now known as U.S. Highway 41, into a four-lane thoroughfare. Fairground at the time was already four lanes from Roswell to Lockheed. Mayor Atherton said that plans were 35-percent complete and that “there might be some problem in gaining the right of way to two or three pieces of property.”

♦♦♦

It was reported in the Wednesday, July 7, 1965 paper that Dr. Glenn Reed of Marietta had been elected president-elect of Kiwanis International at the International Kiwanis Convention in New York City. He defeated W. Clyde Glass of Louisville, Kentucky in balloting at the Madison Square Garden event, which was attended by 20,000 Kiwanians.

Reed was to be inducted on Aug. 1 in ceremonies in Chicago. He was to take office as president in July 1966 in Portland, Oregon and expected to direct 275,000 members of the community service organization for business and professional men.

♦♦♦

A photo on the front page of the Friday, July 9, 1965 paper showed the intersection of Old 41 and Georgia 293 in Kennesaw, which was the scene of an unusual traffic accident.

The wreck involved a passenger car and a tractor trailer truck that was carrying two other trucks piggy-back. The image showed the two carried trucks laying on their passenger sides scattered across the intersection. Both drivers were treated at Kennestone Hospital for injuries.

♦♦♦

It was also reported in that paper, that a “For Sale” sign had been placed on Marietta’s Clark Library by the Marietta City Council. Bids for the building and its property, located at the corner of Church and Lemon Streets, were being received by the council.

Built in 1893, the original library was octagonal in shape and had a scale miniature of the main reading room of the British Museum of London. According to retired city librarian Florence Sibley, the building was the only one of its kind in the United States. Money for the construction of the library was given by Sarah Freeman Clark in memory of her father, James Freeman Clark – a renowned New England minister and educator who came to Marietta for his health.

The Clark Library was organized in 1893 with books from the Clark family library, which included many rare books. Some of the more notable pieces were an autographed set of books by Oliver Wendell Holmes and works by Louisa May Alcott. When the library first opened, it had about 5,000 volumes. At the time of its closure, there were approximately 100,000 books in circulation.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, July 3, 1995 paper, 110 Kennesaw homeowners were reported as being “up in arms over a pending request before Cobb commissioners to place the Fowler-Marland House on the Cobb Historic Register.” The homeowners contended that the owners of the property were trying to use the historical designation to “skirt county codes.”

Homeowners in the Dunmovin subdivision charged that the home’s owners, Burt and Elizabeth Marland of Chicago, were attempting to obtain the status so they could turn the property into a bed and breakfast establishment.

Bed and breakfasts were considered a “special exception use” in Cobb County and were not bound by standard zoning. If the house was approved to the county’s historic register it could then be used as a bed and breakfast, providing that it met other requirements.

♦♦♦

A federal judge was reported in the Wednesday, July 5, 1995 paper as having temporarily halted construction on a portion of the controversial East-West Connector through the Concord Covered Bridge District in south Cobb.

U.S. District Court Judge William C. O’Kelley ruled that Cobb County could not begin construction on the nearly 3-mile segment of the connector through the historic district until the court could hear the permanent injunction request by Protect Endangered Areas of Cobb’s History (PEACH). Judge O’Kelley also prohibited the county from accepting any bids on the segment without notifying the court.

The temporary injunction did not preclude the county from continuing work begun in mid-May on the nearly 3-mile, $12 million stretch of the connector from Fontaine Road to South Cobb Drive.

♦♦♦

In the Friday, July 7, 1995 paper, it was reported that Marietta’s ordinance prohibiting alcohol from strip clubs was hit with its second challenge as Boomer’s filed a lawsuit seeking enough money to fund six city budgets. Filed in Cobb Superior Court, the lawsuit was asking for compensatory and punitive damages of at least $165 million if the city enforced the law, which would take effect on Jan. 1, 1996.

Like a similar action filed a month earlier by Club Taj Mahal, the Boomer’s suit named the city and all but one of the individual council members as defendants. Boomers and the Taj Mahal were located within a mile of each other on Cobb Parkway near Windy Hill Road.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of July 2
by Damon_Poirier
July 01, 2015 01:00 PM | 798 views | 0 0 comments | 57 57 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Marines, a cave rescue, Lockheed, an atom smasher and a tornado.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, July 2, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story that reported the Cooperative Cattle Feeders Association of Cobb County was organized at the county courthouse for the purpose of encouraging the feeding of beef cattle in the county during the winter season.

There were nine feeders present that joined the association in addition to the three local banks and the Bank of Powder Springs. The association agreed to take 500 head of cattle and before feeding time came to purchase another 1,000 head of cattle.

50 years ago …

Two Mableton Marines who were killed in a California plane crash over the weekend were reported in the Monday, June 28, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal as having had a premonition of danger when they were home on leave the week before the accident.

According to the mother of one Marine and the sister-in-law of the other, both of the teens had acted as if something bad was going to happen to them. The pair postponed their trip from Cobb County to California four times, finally arriving in San Diego about an hour before their leave was up. Four days later, they were listed among the 84 people killed when an Air Force transport plane crashed into a California mountain.

♦♦♦

A silver identification bracelet was reported in the Tuesday, June 29, 1965 paper as probably saving the life of a 20-year-old Smyrna man who fell 80 feet into Case Cave, an underground cave on Lookout Mountain in Cartersville.

The bracelet apparently caught on a jagged rock as the man fell and broke his fall, which resulted in only minor injuries.

One of the man’s rescuers was his 17-year-old brother, who climbed a rope 80 feet down into the cave to get to the man who “was covered in mud and lying on a rock.” The brother with a doctor and other rescuers worked for several hours to tie the man to a stretcher and inch him 80 feet back up through the narrow cave opening, which was described as close in size to a three-foot long coffee table.

The man, a co-op student at Southern Tech, was listed in good condition at Tri-County Hospital in Oglethorpe after being rescued from his 16 hour ordeal.

♦♦♦

The first of eight C-124 Globemasters for the 445th Troop Carrier Wing was reported in the Thursday, July 1, 1965 paper as having touched down at the Dobbins Air Force Base runway the day before. Arrival of the “mammoth four-engine transport began the wing’s transition from the C-123 Providers.”

Col. Carl. F. Rudder, director of operations for the 445th, explained the C-124 would change the wing from “an airborne unit to a global operation to support MATS (the Military Air Transport Service).”

The 230-mph transport could carry 40,000 pounds of cargo 1,800 miles. It had clam-shell nose doors, which opened so a built-in loading ramp could be used. Almost every motorized vehicle used by the military at the time was able to be driven up the ramp into the aircraft and flown away fully assembled.

An elevator in the middle of the fuselage of the plane could also be used to speed the loading or unloading of cargo. The C-124 also could carry 200 battle-equipped infantrymen or, with litters installed, 127 patients and their medical attendants could be flown from the battlefield.

♦♦♦

The number of bids submitted by Georgia interests for “one of the most sought-after plums ever offered by the federal government,” a $230 million “world’s biggest atom smasher,” was reported in the Friday, July 2, 1965 paper as having increased to nine. The proposed sites were mostly concentrated in the Atlanta area, but two were located in southern Georgia in the cities of Savannah and Bainbridge.

The location closest to Cobb County was in Cartersville and entered by the Atlanta-Georgia Science and Technology Commission.

The nine sites were among 100 others from 43 states in the competition for the “sprawling, three-mile-in-circumference facility,” which was more than twice the size and capable of twice power of the largest facility that was being planned at the time by the Soviet Union.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, June 27, 1995 paper, it was reported that Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems emerged virtually unscathed from the corporate cost-cutting ax as its Bethesda, Maryland-based parent company announced plans to trim 7 percent off its 170,000-member work force by 1999.

As anticipated, Lockheed Martin Corp.’s Cobb County plant was to see minimal job cuts in the merger-related consolidation effort. The 340-employee purchasing department, which bought airplane parts and office supplies, was to be phased out. The department, which was located in what is now the LGE Community Credit Union building on Fairground Street, was to be meshed into a single department at Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems in Fort Worth, Texas.

♦♦♦

A powerful thunderstorm was reported in the Saturday, July 1, 1995 paper as having raked Cobb County the evening before and spawned a tornado that heavily damaged the Dairy Queen at 2598 South Cobb Drive in Smyrna, but only caused minor injuries.

Restaurant owner Doug Stoner, who would later become a state senator, was quoted as saying that he yelled for everyone to hit the floor after high winds blew the doors open. Moments later, the building was hit and the southwest side of the restaurant’s dining room collapsed as the windows were blown out from the force of the twister.

There were 15 customers and 10 employees in the restaurant, which was to mark its 40th anniversary later in the year and undergoing a partial renovation, at the time of the storm.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of June 25
by Damon_Poirier
June 26, 2015 03:40 PM | 869 views | 0 0 comments | 61 61 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a Leo Frank, rapid transit, melons, Whitlock Avenue, the Tritt family and Lockheed.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, June 25, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story that reported that Leo Frank’s death sentence for the now infamous murder of Mary Phagan of Marietta was commuted to life imprisonment by Gov. John M. Slaton. Frank was taken to Milledgeville “to serve his sentence on the State farm.”

A second story in that edition involving the Frank case reported that on July 2, the public could attend the unveiling of a monument to the memory of Phagan at her grave in the Marietta City Cemetery. The monument was a simple slab of gray marble on a triple base with an inscription that read: “Mary Phagan, Erected by Marietta Camp, Number 763, U.C.V.”

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, June 20, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that Cobb Commission Chairman Ernest Barrett was quoted as saying “I guess we took one heck of a big step backwards” while looking back on the previous Wednesday’s defeat of the Rapid Transit Referendum by the county’s voters. But, Barrett, Sen. Kyle Yancey and Rep. Hugh McDaniell all predicted that the county eventually would become a member of the proposed Metropolitan Atlanta Transit System.

“It is going to cost us more when we do get in it,” Barrett said, but indicated he had no doubt that citizens would soon realize they made a mistake.

Sen. Yancey was quoted as saying that he did not think there is anything to do now, but wait while the people come around to the fact that they were wrong. He also said, “I believe it would have been wise to have been in on the planning stages.”

♦♦♦

Melons were reported in the Wednesday, June 23, 1965 paper as having a bad day on the county’s highways.

Early that morning, a truck carrying a load of watermelons and cantaloupes were lost when the truck had a blow out and overturned at the intersection of the Four Lane, now known as U.S. Highway 41, and Interstate 285. There were no injuries in the accident, but the overturned truck blocked both northbound lanes of the highway and backed up traffic for five miles.

Then, shortly after noon, 764 watermelons were strewn out of a tractor-trailer truck over the Four Lane at Franklin Road in a five-car collision.

♦♦♦

Lloyd Cox, the former principal of Marietta High School, was reported in the Friday, June 25, 1965 paper as having been appointed superintendent of the city school system by the Marietta Board of Education. Cox was filling the vacancy created when Henry Kemp resigned to take a job with the State Board of Education.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, June 20, 1995 paper, State Department of Transportation Commissioner Wayne Shackelford endorsed a new road linking Dallas Highway with Reynolds Street at the South Loop as the solution to the daily Whitlock Avenue bottleneck.

“This is by far the most acceptable solution from a traffic standpoint,” Shackelford was quoted as saying during a tour of road projects in Cobb County organized by state Sen. Steve Thompson, D-Powder Springs, who chaired the Senate Transportation Committee. “It gives the traffic a straight shot and eliminates all the turning movements (at Powder Springs Road).”

More than 30,000 cars were traveling each day into and out of Marietta along Dallas Highway, many using the North and South Loops to get to Interstate 75 and east Cobb. The state was widening Dallas Highway to four lanes with a raised median from the Paulding County line to John Ward Road west of Marietta. But, the road narrowed into two lanes as it changed into Whitlock Avenue approaching the Marietta Square.

♦♦♦

East Cobb’s oldest historic home was reported in the Wednesday, June 21, 1995 paper as expected to be preserved and restored under development plans approved by the Cobb commissioners at a regular zoning hearing. Marietta-based developer B. Wilmont Williams said that he planned to restore the Tritt Homestead, built between 1845 and 1860, as part of a 41.5-acre subdivision on the south side of Post Oak Tritt Road and west of Johnson Ferry Road.

As recommended by county staff, Williams said he would apply to place the home, known for its pre-Civil War Greek Revival details, on local and national historical registers.

Titleholders on the property were James E. Tritt, Larry M. Tritt, Melissa Tritt Mathison and Wylene S. Tritt, descendants of the longtime east Cobb family. Other descendants of the family included popular country singer Travis Tritt, whose grandfather was memorialized by the road that bears his name, as well as Tritt Elementary.

Williams said the restored 1,200-square foot house would serve as the 82-home subdivision’s centerpiece and clubhouse surrounded by tennis courts and a swimming pool.

♦♦♦

A Russian aircraft design team and Bethesda, Maryland-based Lockheed Martin Co. were reported in the Thursday, June 22, 1995 paper as having teamed up to design a multi-purpose, 21st century fighter plane that could take off vertically or in normal fashion. The Moscow-based Yakovlev Design Bureau joined Lockheed Martin in the project to build the advanced attack aircraft for the U.S. military, although the Russian government still needed to approve the transfer of technology.

The total cost of the project was expected to reach $68.8 million, according to a spokesman for Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems in Fort Worth, Texas where the bulk of the work would be done. Cobb-based Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems would provide engineering on the project.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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