Local Girl Scout awarded highest attainable honor
by Hannah Morgan
March 02, 2014 04:00 AM | 3224 views | 2 2 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Brittany Weller, 17, will be awarded the highest attainable honor in the Girl Scouts today, the Gold Award, comparable to a Boy Scout’s Eagle Scout ranking. <br> Special to the MDJ
Brittany Weller, 17, will be awarded the highest attainable honor in the Girl Scouts today, the Gold Award, comparable to a Boy Scout’s Eagle Scout ranking.
Special to the MDJ
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Weller is also a senior honor student at Allatoona High School and the captain of the school’s color guard.
Weller is also a senior honor student at Allatoona High School and the captain of the school’s color guard.
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KENNESAW — Brittany Weller, 17, will be awarded the highest attainable honor in the Girl Scouts today. At a ceremony at the Fox Theatre in Atlanta, the Allatoona High School senior will be rewarded for months of hard work and dedication to making girls like her smile.

Weller joined the Girl Scouts when she was 5 years old. Neither Weller nor her mother, Melissa, remember why, but more than 12 years later, Weller can’t imagine life without being a Scout.

Her Girl Scout troop disbanded last year, as there was a lack of interest from the other girls. Soon after, Weller decided to register alone, without a troop leader or fellow troop members.

She wanted to get her Gold Award, the highest honor in Girl Scouts, comparable to a Boy Scout’s Eagle Scout ranking.

The Gold Award is a seven-step process, where Scouts identify a problem within their community and come up with a solution, all while educating and inspiring their peers, according to the Girl Scouts of the USA website.

The prestigious award is a challenging process, and very rarely do Scouts attempt and complete one alone, said Melissa Weller.

Without a troop leader or friends to support her, Brittany Weller said the almost six-month-long process wasn’t easy.

“It was really hard to go at it alone. With a group of people, it’s much easier,” she said.

Weller, an honor-student and captain of her high school’s color guard, said she was tired of seeing her fellow teammates downtrodden and catty after band practice each day. She came up with an idea to bring cheer and camaraderie back to the locker room.

“All the girls would come in and be angry and tired and upset with everyone. It would take one girl to make a difference and cheer everyone up,” Weller said.

She wanted to be that one girl.

Weller created a plan to ensure there would always be cheer present in the team space, not only at Allatoona, but at high schools all over Cobb.

Weller made calls to local businesses and family members and asked for donations for her project. She purchased a number of foam bulletin boards and contacted local high school principals and band directors asking for an hour of their school’s color guards’ time.

Weller helped five high school color guard teams create individualized “spirit boards” that now hang in their team rooms. The boards, assembled by color guard members at each school, are covered with inspirational quotes, inside jokes and colorful decorations.

The process of finding appropriate funds, reaching out to community members in person — instead of texting — and admitting to her peers she was a Girl Scout was a tough journey, Weller said, although she learned a lot about her own potential.

“I learned you can take initiative with the things you want, and if you really want to do it, you just do it. You don’t have to rely on anyone else,” she said.

Weller doesn’t know any other Girl Scouts her age in Cobb County.

Today she will be honored with a gold pin to attach to her Girl Scout vest and enter an elite class of women who have made differences in their communities.

Weller has her eyes set on illustrative design and hopes to attend Savannah College of Art and Design next year.

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Cobb Taxpayer
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March 03, 2014
Brittany, Love you committment and tenacity - well done - My wife is a Gold Award winner and now a Ph.D.
Cobb Scout Dad
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March 03, 2014
Congratulations Brittany! As the dad of an Eagle Scout, our country needs a whole lot more young people to serve as positive role models. Good luck with your future plans.
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