High court wrestles with Indian adoption dispute
by Associated Press Wire
April 16, 2013 12:45 PM | 342 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
This October 2011 photo provided by Melanie Capobianco shows her adoptive daughter Veronica trick-or-treating, in Charleston, S.C. The U.S. Supreme Court this week will hear an emotional family challenge to longstanding federal law on the adoption of Native American children, with several states, tribes and children's welfare groups lining up to support the current rules. The case involves a South Carolina couple fighting for custody of their adopted daughter who, after a court battle, was returned to her biological father in Oklahoma. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Melanie Capobianco)
This October 2011 photo provided by Melanie Capobianco shows her adoptive daughter Veronica trick-or-treating, in Charleston, S.C. The U.S. Supreme Court this week will hear an emotional family challenge to longstanding federal law on the adoption of Native American children, with several states, tribes and children's welfare groups lining up to support the current rules. The case involves a South Carolina couple fighting for custody of their adopted daughter who, after a court battle, was returned to her biological father in Oklahoma. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Melanie Capobianco)
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WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is trying to sort out a wrenching adoption case involving a Native American child, a biological father who first renounced any interest in her and adoptive parents who were eventually ordered to hand her over to the father.

The justices were hearing an appeal from the South Carolina couple who wanted to adopt the girl, named Veronica. The outcome of the case was unclear after arguments Tuesday that included an unusually emotional appeal from the couple's lawyer.

The case turns on the federal Indian Child Welfare Act, enacted in 1978 because Indian children were being removed from their homes and typically placed with non-Indian adoptive or foster parents.



Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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