Cobb set to host NAACP convention
by Geoff Folsom
October 02, 2012 01:29 AM | 5512 views | 11 11 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Deane Bonner
Deane Bonner
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GALLERIA — Cobb NAACP President Deane Bonner said much has changed since the last time the county hosted the Georgia State NAACP Convention and Civil Rights Conference in 1995.

“We as a branch have grown, not only in participation, it is certainly a lot more diverse,” Bonner said.

Although the Cobb NAACP doesn’t reveal membership numbers, Bonner estimated the chapter is about 40 percent larger than it was in 1995. She said it’s also more diverse, with 10 percent to 15 percent more non-black members.

“In ’95, we would not have had more than 10 people who were not African American,” she said.

The 70th state convention will run from Oct. 11 to 14 at the Atlanta Marriott Northwest at Galleria Hotel, 200 Interstate North Parkway.

The event is being called “Your Power, Your Decision — VOTE.” It will include a luncheon and leadership council meeting with Edward O. DuBose, a national NAACP board member, along with meetings for the NAACP’s state youth and college divisions. The conference will also feature workshops on topics such as political action, education, health, housing, veterans’ affairs and legal redress.

While the events at the Marriott require registration, Bonner said anyone in the community can attend a free Oct. 11 kickoff event at Turner Chapel AME Church, 492 North Marietta Parkway, which will include remarks from Dr. Nelson Rivers, pastor of Clarity Missionary Baptist Church in North Charleston, S.C., a longtime NAACP leader. The event begins at 6:30 p.m.

Bonner said organizers are expecting between 500 and 700 people from the state’s 102 NAACP branches to attend the conference.

“We’re hoping for more,” she said. “We want to break the record.”

Bonner said Cobb beat out Athens and Macon for the right to host the conference. It is expected to draw political, business and religious leaders from across the state.

“It was a thrill that we won, and we’re happy to have it,” she said.
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Just Facts
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October 10, 2012
I have never understood why "people" believe the NAACP is for Blacks Only? We don't have enough time to educate you on the focus of the NAACP.

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Founding group

The NAACP was formed partly in response to the continuing horrific practice of lynching and the 1908 race riot in Springfield, the capital of Illinois and resting place of President Abraham Lincoln. Appalled at the violence that was committed against blacks, a group of white liberals that included Mary White Ovington and Oswald Garrison Villard, both the descendants of abolitionists, William English Walling and Dr. Henry Moscowitz issued a call for a meeting to discuss racial justice. Some 60 people, seven of whom were African American (including W. E. B. Du Bois, Ida B. Wells-Barnett and Mary Church Terrell), signed the call, which was released on the centennial of Lincoln's birth.

Other early members included Joel and Arthur Spingarn, Josephine Ruffin, Mary Talbert, Inez Milholland, Jane Addams, Florence Kelley, Sophonisba Breckinridge, John Haynes Holmes, Mary McLeod Bethune, George Henry White, Charles Edward Russell, John Dewey, William Dean Howells, Lillian Wald, Charles Darrow, Lincoln Steffens, Ray Stannard Baker, Fanny Garrison Villard, and Walter Sachs.

Echoing the focus of Du Bois' Niagara Movement began in 1905, the NAACP's stated goal was to secure for all people the rights guaranteed in the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the United States Constitution, which promised an end to slavery, the equal protection of the law, and universal adult male suffrage, respectively.

The NAACP's principal objective is to ensure the political, educational, social and economic equality of minority group citizens of United States and eliminate race prejudice. The NAACP seeks to remove all barriers of racial discrimination through the democratic processes

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But I will tell you that the efforts of the NAACP to fight racism was the basis for the fight in other ism's and biases... Ageism, Sexism, Disabilities, etc...

If you join the NAACP then I will join the NRA...see how this works... so sad... so sad...

NAACP OK, But...
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October 03, 2012
Understanding that even though I didn't have anything to do with it, black people got a super raw deal for a long time, so I don't care if there is a special interest group that deals with that minority's unique problems. There are lots of special interest groups in our country.

However, I do hope that while they are talking to members about politics, they point out that there is more than one option in any election. President Obama has done precious little to help the black community, and it seems to me NAACP members should really consider the alternatives that might help pull down the black community's sky-rocketing unemployment rates that have hurt them more than anyone else in the last four years.
Common Sense
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October 03, 2012
I certainly don't condone the history of how slaves were treated, just as I don't like how the Jews were treated in Germany during WWII, as no one should ever be a slave to anyone. The fact of the matter is that there has been much opportunity for black Americans to improve their lot in life. Slavery ended centuries ago and the civil rights movement occured over fifty years ago with so many advantages given to black people. While every person regardless of race should understand the impact that has specifically happened to the black race, this history doesn't give it prudence as an excuse in this day and age to treat people as if they were actual slave owners and are looking for retribution. The fact that the US has now had a black president in office for four years should show that every black person has no excuse and every opportunity to be successful. If anything, black liberation theology and the leaders of that type of thinking should be questioned as to why race is an issue or a deterrent to success. When black families teach their kids not to trust white people, that is racist and it only perpetuates the cycle of an imprisonment of the mind. When a black president continues to use racial division for political gain, that not only sends a message to blacks that they aren't good enough to make it in a competitive world based on merit alone, it manifests and harvests a false sense of bitterness, frustration and entitlement only enslaving the black person even more. If you want to free any culture of mental and physical slavery, empower them to be the best they can be, not holding them back through hatred. Racism is alive and well because those that choose to look through lense of racism as crutch allow it to take root in their lives, minds and hearts by choice.
tire of it
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October 02, 2012
to" I am sure"-- if you knew your history slaves were actually sold by their own people in africa to whoever would buy slaves so maybe you ought to have a problem with your black ancestors for selling your black ancestor as slaves in the first place.. I for one do not agree with slavery and never have and the fact is no race is any better than the other but when all you hear about is blacks were slaves and how bad white people are after a while it gets old.,

Funny thing is you only hear about the south owning slaves but you never hear about the fact that the blacks were sold as slaves by other BLACK people. so maybe people ought to remember that part too? the slave owners were not the only bad people in this whole ordeal so were the sellers. But i imagine someone will come up with an excuse for the sellers.
I am sure
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October 02, 2012
I am fully aware of the origins of the slave trade. It is true that tribal leaders sold their people into slavery. It is also true that white people purchased the slaves.

This, however, has nothing to do with the fact that the NAACP is set to meet in Cobb. The fact of the matter is black people have every right to have organizations promoting their interests. "Common Sense's" original comment, which "tired of it" agreed with, does little to hide their annoyance that the NAACP is holding a meeting in the first place, let alone in Cobb County.

If you have a problem with that, I would suggest not attending.
GA EM
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October 02, 2012
If you knew the history of the organization, you would know some of the founders were white.
Common Sense
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October 02, 2012
Would it be offensive if there was an organization called NAAWP(National Association for the Advancement of White People) and we organized together to promote the white vote? Would it be perceived to be racist? Just curious...
tired of it
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October 02, 2012
Yep, i was thinking the same thing. I have no problem with blacks never have but it is funny how the black have all these specific organization naacp, bet, awards for blacks only cant remember what its called but if it was the other way around the blacks would be calling it racist. There will always be racism as long as there are people like Jesse Jackson and the likes of him keeping blacks down, instead of encouraging the black race to get up go get jobs you CAN do it, he encourages them to stay on the government plantation and that they are OWED something from people.
I am sure
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October 02, 2012
It would not be perceived to be racist if you as a white person and your ancestors had endured hundreds to years of slavery and then weathered through a 20th century civil rights movement that is STILL a deep scar on the face of this country. The ramifications of which are still seen regularly today.

I get your point, however lest we forget what happend. I am positive that if the tables were turned there would no doubt be a NAAWP as you put it.
irrelevant
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October 02, 2012
Cry me a river. That stuff had nothing to do with present day and with ME. I have nothing to do with the massive chip they still have on their shoulders. Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, John Lewis...the list goes on. Race baiters and THEY are the real reason racism will always hang around. I have no idea why the NCAAP is even still around. Just so irrelevant.

The other day there was a feature on ESPN about the new head football coach for Alcorn State. You know, Alcorn State...a Historically Black College. Good for them, but this new guy is white. He loves his school, loves his players and loves the fact he was given a chance to be their head football coach. They had a panel of 3 guys to discuss this 'controversial hire'. Two of the guys gave a hearty, 'Thumbs up' endorsement and thought it was a good and positive thing. The 3rd guy wasn't as agreeable and his actual quote started out: 'Well, but back in 1864 when slaves...' I just changed the channel.
I am sure
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October 02, 2012
This may come to a total surprise to you "irrelevant" but it's not about you. There are still people who are alive that lived through the civil rights movement and they have every right to the NAACP.

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