Adopt-a-thon’s goal: Help needy animals find a home
by Lindsay Field
May 16, 2013 12:37 AM | 3663 views | 11 11 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Felix, a playful 2-year-old feline.<br>Staff/Laura Moon
Felix, a playful 2-year-old feline.
Staff/Laura Moon
slideshow
Jimmy Pickles pauses for just a quick moment as he plays with Cobb County Animal Control Kennel Supervisor Shana Luke in the bonding area in the county’s animal shelter. Jimmy Pickles will be one of the featured animals during Saturday’s Cobb County Animal Control adopt-a-thon. <br>Staff/Laura Moon
Jimmy Pickles pauses for just a quick moment as he plays with Cobb County Animal Control Kennel Supervisor Shana Luke in the bonding area in the county’s animal shelter. Jimmy Pickles will be one of the featured animals during Saturday’s Cobb County Animal Control adopt-a-thon.
Staff/Laura Moon
slideshow
Even if you aren’t looking to adopt a new cat or dog, the Cobb County Animal Shelter is inviting the public to come visit the facility this weekend and attend its fifth adopt-a-thon.

“There’s such a need to help animals out there,” said shelter volunteer and event coordinator Fran Jackson of west Cobb. “I enjoy doing the adopt-a-thons and I’ll do it forever.”

There will be 30 vendors on site, all of which are local animal-related businesses and organizations, food vendors, raffles, music and a book-signing by Ed T. Payne, the author of “The Daily Rounds of a Hound” about a dog named Molly that was adopted from the local shelter.

Other participants in this year’s ever-growing event are a mobile groomer, a Cobb County K-9 demonstration, dog day cares, a mini agility course for dogs, rescue groups for rabbits and reptiles and animal clinics that work closely with the shelter.

The newest addition will be a visit by Cooper’s Cupboard, which is a pet food pantry.

“They help people keep animals that they might want to turn in but might need help with the food,” Jackson said. “They try to help people keep a pet in their house.”

The shelter will be accepting donations of unopened, unexpired food for the pantry.

There will also be special deals on adoption costs for any cats or dogs adopted.

“We have anything that anybody is looking for,” Jackson said. “Long-haired, short-haired, pure bread, big or small … we’ve got it.”

The adoption fee during Saturday’s event will be $85. It is normally $115. This cost includes spaying or neutering, a microchip, heartworm tests, combo tests for cat, the first set of shots, deworming and rabies shots.

The shelter will have two dogs and two cats every hour that can be adopted at a special rate of $45. It has 299 animals available for adoption, including 168 dogs and 131 cats of all ages.

“We are looking for forever homes in these adoptions,” Jackson said.

She also said they are hoping to continue to increase the number of animals adopted like in years past.

The first year of the event they adopted out 60 animals in six hours and last year it was 70.

“Our number to beat is 70,” Jackson said. “If we get to 71, I’d be so excited”

Each time an animal is adopted, they ring a cowbell and announce thse owner’s name over the speakers.

“The whole place goes into an uproar!” Jackson said.

The weekend adopt-a-thon is the first for the new shelter director.

“I’m looking forward to meeting the public, the type of people that wouldn’t ordinarily come to the shelter,” Lt. Cheryl Shepard said. “And hopefully get a lot of animals adopted.”

There are about 300 animals at the shelter at this time and Robert Quigley, spokesman for Cobb County Government, said the shelter took in 13,305 animals in 2012 and euthanized 6,964.

“There is no hard and fast rule on when an animal is put down,” he said. “Factors considered are health, age and disposition. We try hard to find them homes.”
Comments
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Cobb Volunteer
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May 17, 2013
This is a great event and everyone should come out! There will be lots of volunteers and staff there to help match you up with the perfect animal. We have so many amazing dogs. Please share with everyone you know!
Another Animal Lover
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May 16, 2013
Unfortunately, because folks do not spay/neuter their pets, there will neved be enough homes for all the lovable companion animals. Nationally, 6 to 8 million go in shelters every year but only half, or 3 to 4 million, get adopted. J. B. Flood, II is a Cobb resident who has written two books that explain about dog rescue and spay/neuter. It is basically a local issue to work toward a solution. Cobb County tries very hard but despite their efforts, they still have to euthanize 52% of the shelter animals. People need to help Cobb and the local rescue groups!
Animal Lover
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May 16, 2013
There are several movements for the No-Kill resolution taking place, thank goodness. In my opinion, responsibility in spaying/neutering and responsibility in not relinquishing an animal for lame excuses as well as the realization that a pet is a life-long commitment are the prerequisites for pet ownership. I still think there needs to be a national database for animal abusers and those who frivolously adopt and surrender.
PDSledge
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May 16, 2013
Cooper's Cupboard is an incredible organization and although new, has helped many people with food for their animals when they could not afford it! So glad to see they are part of this worthwhile event. Sounds like a lot of fun!
Animal lover
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May 16, 2013
Thank you so much for this publicity for animal control. Much more publicity is needed to help alleviate the weekly crisis in this shelter and the surrounding counties. There are so many animals that need to be adopted to avoid euthanasia as this will be their fate without being adopted. The public needs to realize that because they surrender their animals to a shelter does not guarantee that they will be adopted, but they will be more likely be destroyed due to an overloaded shelter with only so much room. This crisis in nationwide with thousands of animals being killed daily. What a sad commentary on our ability to help homeless animals. So much more has to be done to stop the killing.
Doing My Part
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May 16, 2013
I'd like to adopt Shana!
oh my
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May 17, 2013
You want to adopt Shana??? She is not housebroken...or so Ive heard!!
relatives read this
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May 23, 2013
Shana's relatives say she is already adopted and house broken!!
Kathy Dickens
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May 16, 2013
I am so glad to see publicity for the shelter event and hope that it encourages folks to come out. I have been to several of the events and they do a really nice job. I always have a good time and end up with goodies for my two pups. Thanks for the article. It's great to showcase all the positive work going on at the shelter. And it will hopefully generate some forever homes for these wonderful homeless pets.
anonymous
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May 16, 2013
God bless you for what you are doing. Another thing that needs to be done is to campaign in metro Atlanta to spay and neuter pets and give this free to people in order to reduce the number of pets brought to the shelter.

I worked with a lady that remarried and her husband said she had to take her dog of 12 years to the shelter, and she did. I'm sorry, if I had a dog for 12 years and the man I married told me to take my dog to the shelter, I would tell him to take himself instead.

The only way to cut down on the amount of animals being euthanized is to cut down on the amount of animals being born into irresponsible and uncaring households.

Anyway, my hat is off to all at Cobb County Animal Control. I, personally, could not do your heart-wrenching job. Salute.
Animal lover
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May 16, 2013
It is utterly amazing that many senior animals are surrendered, and I can not understand this mentality, only in very rare cases. There are many stupid reasons for surrendering...I read that there is an influx of owner surrenders when vacation or spring break rolls around. I keep thinking a national database needs to be established on owner surrenders and abusers so they never again forsake an animal.

This is a problem that can be solved only at the local level.

There are many good rescues taking in as many as they can, but they are overwhelmed and overloaded to the extent that many can not take more.
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