MDJ Time Capsule by Damon_Poirier
This week’s Time Capsule looks at WWI, a bear, a gas leak, Lockheed, rapid transit, the Braves, a gold mine and the F-22.
October 25, 2014 04:00 AM | 86677 views | 0 0 comments | 2601 2601 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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The Week of February 21st
by Damon_Poirier
February 20, 2013 03:16 PM | 1039 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at the performance of an aeronaut, the shotgun attack on a local black family’s home and the end of the county’s five-year dispute with former Gov. Lester Maddox.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Feb. 21, 1913 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story about the well attended annual prize drill of the Marietta Rifles taking place at the Auditorium. Sgt. O.C. Cassidy was awarded the gold medal for first prize, which was his second consecutive victory.

The story also stated that if Sgt. Cassidy were to win the 1914 prize drill, then the gold medal would permanently become his property. A second place cash prize was awarded to Sgt. William Cooper.

Also in that week’s paper, Hugh Manning, the proprietor of the Gem and Princess Theatres, was reported as having arranged to give a free exhibition at 2 p.m. the following day. The event, written about on the front page and in a large advertisement on page two, would feature Aeronaut C.E. Bankston making a daring parachute drop in the vacant lot next to W.W. Watkins’ blacksmith and wagon shop on Washington Avenue.

Bankston was expected to drop from a balloon several thousand feet in the air with three parachutes, using one at a time until he had changed parachutes three times in mid-air. After the flight, Bankston was to give a lecture on the trials and narrow escapes that happen in his profession at the Gem Theatre.

50 years ago …

The Marietta School Board was reported in the Friday, Feb. 15, 1963 MDJ as having proposed a tougher policy requiring all teachers to hold college degrees or be working for their diplomas. The board also took under consideration an offer to give free Bibles to elementary school children and received some opposition to that plan.

A request to change Marietta city government to four-year terms for the mayor and council was reported in the Tuesday, Feb. 19, 1963 paper. Councilmen told the paper that the provisions were part of a package of legislation affecting the city of Marietta, drawn up by Mayor Sam Welsch and submitted to the Cobb delegation.

Also that day, the Smyrna City Council was reported as asking for a voice in the setting of rates on the Cobb-Marietta Water Authority, which sold water to the city wholesale. Smyrna was the second Cobb city to make the request in recent days. Mayor Jack Ables declared that Smyrna was the fourth largest user of water after Cobb County, Marietta and Lockheed-Georgia Co.

A five-category rating system for films shown in Marietta theaters were reported approved by the city’s newly-organized Motion Picture Study Committee in the Wednesday, Feb. 20, 1963 paper. Paul Greenlee, the committee spokesman, said that Martin Theaters in the city had agreed to publish the ratings along with their advertisements of future films.

Four shotgun blasts were fired at the home of a black family in Marietta early on Thursday, Feb. 21, 1963 and was the second mysterious attack against the family for that year. Two of the shots crashed through a front window shortly after midnight and pellets sprayed a room occupied by a woman and her two teenage daughters.

Two more shots exploded from the darkness about half an hour later and struck the outside of the small frame dwelling. All seven occupants of the house escaped without injury.

A bullet fired from a pistol in a previous attack in mid-January shattered the home’s front window and woke several members of the sleeping family. Officers said they were planning to press the hunt for the gunman in the hopes of catching him before another assault was made.

Another story that day about Cobb’s growth was mentioned in an article within the February issue of Newsweek Magazine entitled, “Defense: Meat and Potatoes.” The paragraphs about Cobb appeared on page 28.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, Feb. 15, 1993 MDJ, a Georgia National Guard helicopter ambulance unit at Dobbins Air Reserve Base was reported as being on the list of units that could potentially be deactivated in fiscal year 1994. One of six Guard units slated for deactivation as part of a downsizing of the military, the 129-member unit – the 148th Medical Co. – flew 12 Vietnam war-era UH-1H “Huey” helicopters.

The Cobb County Commission reported that it had ended a five-year dispute with former Georgia Gov. Lester Maddox in the Wednesday, Feb. 17, 1993 paper with a vote to rezone Maddox’s 1.2-acre home site on Johnson Ferry Road to a commercial retail category. The board voted 4-0 with Commissioner Bill Cooper abstaining, to approve a neighborhood retail commercial category for the property, which was surrounded by major shopping centers and offices.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of February 14th
by Damon_Poirier
February 14, 2013 11:10 AM | 1004 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at the visit of a Sioux Indian chief, a 70-foot sign for Rich’s in Smyrna and a legislative resolution to keep the original appearance of Big Chicken.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Feb. 14, 1913 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story about visiting Proctor and Gamble Co. representative A.T. Vickery of Cincinnati. The company, which manufactured Crisco, had Vickery arrange for Mrs. E.S. Siple to conduct a series of cooking lectures and demonstrations at the Auditorium Armory. Siple was also to give away a pound cake each day to one of the ladies in the audience.

Sioux Indian Chief Red Fox, who was playing at the Gem Theatre in Marietta that week, gave the Marietta Boy Scouts a lecture at the Auditorium. The chief had planned to “hit the trail” with the boys, but the rain interfered. However, Chief Red Fox promised that he would be passing through again in June and would try to spend a week with the scouts camping.

Also reported that week was the celebration of Georgia Day by the fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh grades of the Marietta public schools two days before. In Ms. Sena Towers’ classroom the black boards were adorned with the Coat of Arms of Georgia in colored chalk and the State flag was used in decorating. As part of the program, the 60 student class sang “The Red Old Hills of Georgia,” “The Bonnie Blue Flag,” and “We Are Old Time Confederates.”

50 years ago …

Builders of the new Rich’s and Food Fair Shopping center near Smyrna were reported in the Friday, Feb. 8, 1963 MDJ as having received a county permit to build a 70-foot tall sign. The project manager told county zoning officials that they would also get an okay from federal aviation officials to erect the sign and see if they needed to put aircraft warning lights on the sign to alert low-flying planes at night.

Also that day, a Marietta prisoner, who escaped from a city work gang and ran from a pack of bloodhounds and a squad of policemen, was re-captured in a briar patch near the Cobb-Marietta Industrial Park after three hours of searching. It was the second time the prisoner had been chased by police. The man was serving a 148-day sentence on charges of driving through Marietta at a high rate of speed and forcing other cars off the road with police in pursuit.

An increase in C-130 aircraft production at the Lockheed-Georgia Co. in Marietta was also proposed by the U.S. Air Force that day. If approved, production of C-130s would be increased from 12 to 15 per month and continue rising employment at the plant. The workforce there had climbed from 13,000 to 15,000 in the past year due to increased C-130 production and beginning work on the C-141 jet air freighter.

20 years ago …

Rep. Newt Gingrich, R-east Cobb, in the Tuesday, Feb. 9, 1993 MDJ, was reported as having spoken to members of the Metro Marietta Kiwanis Club at Jimmy’s on the Square. Among the ideas the congressman bounced off the 50 or so members gathered for the meeting was the need for technological advances, liberating small businesses, personal strength and teaching youth the principals of American civilization.

Also that day, a Smyrna man was reported as having escaped uninjured over the weekend when his ultra-light aircraft lost power after takeoff and crashed into the trees about a quarter-mile from a small, private airstrip off Arnold Mill Road in Woodstock. The man received only minor cuts and bruises in the crash, but his Minimax ultra-light plane was destroyed.

Sounding similar to recent events involving two members of the Cobb County Sheriff’s Department working at the county jail, there was a story in the Wednesday, Feb. 10, 1993 paper about a Marietta jailer being charged with sexually assaulting a female inmate at the city jail over the weekend. The inmate had accused the man of raping her in an isolation jail cell.

Another story in that day’s paper reported that the Marietta City Council was considering the approval of a no-smoking policy that would prohibit smoking or chewing tobacco in city-owned or Board of Lights and Water buildings, facilities and vehicles.

More than 50 Georgia House members were reported as having signed a resolution on Friday, Feb. 12, 1993 commending Kentucky Fried Chicken for its efforts to save The Big Chicken on Cobb Parkway, but urged the company to keep with the original model and not a more modern option.

In the Saturday, Feb. 13, 1993 paper, the Cobb-Marietta Coliseum and Exhibit Hall Authority voted 3-2 to change the name in the logo of the county’s new convention center at the Galleria Mall to include the words “Cobb-Atlanta” in small type beneath the convention center’s name, The Galleria Centre. Convention Authority Chairwoman Barbara Williams described the change as an effort to satisfy community sentiment to include Cobb’s name in the county-financed facility and indicated that she wanted the vote to be the authority’s final word on the controversy.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of February 7th
by Damon_Poirier
February 07, 2013 05:17 PM | 1122 views | 1 1 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at dorms for Southern Poly, two famous Louvre paintings coming to Atlanta and potential sites for the 1996 Olympic Games in the county.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Feb. 7, 1913 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier, it was reported that Marietta was to have a new manufacturing plant. J.M. Mitchell, J.C. Dyson and J.H. Hawkins filed an application for a charter in the Superior Court.

Mitchell was the patentee of a machine that was expected to revolutionize “stump pulling” on farms and roads. The machine was said to be able to pull out any stump up to three feet in diameter and only required two men to operate it making mule teams, cables and other appliances unnecessary.

Both Mitchell and Dyson had been out on the road for the past three weeks selling the machines and found they were selling more than their current plant could supply. The pair decided to organize a company and build a larger plant in Marietta.

50 years ago …

It was reported in the Friday, Feb. 1, 1963 paper that the State Board of Regents had written funds into their budget for construction of dormitories at Marietta’s Southern Technical Institute, now Southern Polytechnic State University. When the school opened on its $1.8 million campus it included everything but dormitories. Southern Tech’s boarding students at the time were living in old apartment units originally built for defense workers during World War II and with private rental housing.

Marietta attorney Norman Shipley was reported in the Sunday, Feb. 3, 1963 paper as having been elected district governor of Rotary District 690 – the highest statewide post a Georgia Rotarian could hold. Shipley, a past president of the Marietta Club, was the first district governor elected from the local club since it was founded 43 years earlier.

Two famous paintings, including Whistler’s Mother, were reported in the Monday, Feb. 4, 1963 paper as having arrived in the country for a six-week exhibit in memory of 122 Atlanta art lovers, including two Mariettans that died in a chartered plane crash on take off from Paris’ Orly Field on June 3, 1962.

Marietta resident James V. Carmichael, president of the Atlanta Art Association, met the paintings as they were offloaded from a U.S. troop transport at the Brooklyn, N.Y., Naval yard. The French government had loaned the paintings, which came from Paris’ Louvre museum, to the Atlanta Art Association as a memorial tribute to the association members who died in the crash after touring European art attractions.

Firemen were reported as having washed the streets clean of gasoline in the Thursday, Feb. 7, 1963 paper after a fuel tank was torn free from a taxi cab and hurled against a building during a collision at Anderson and Winters streets in downtown Marietta.

20 years ago …

Cobb Commission Chairman Bill Byrne said in the Friday, Feb. 5, 1993 MDJ that he would push for the construction of a garbage incinerator on County Farm Road in west Cobb as a solution to the county’s longstanding garbage woes. The new chairman provided a brief outline for the plan during his first town hall meeting at the county library in the Merchants Walk shopping center.

State Rep. Roy Barnes (D-Mableton) was reported in the Saturday, Feb. 1993 paper as introducing legislation renaming the county’s new convention center The Cobb Galleria Centre in response to public outcry over a decision to leave the county’s name off of the facility. While several Cobb legislators said they wanted to see Cobb included in the name of the county-financed convention center, they turned a cool shoulder to a section of the bill that would shake up the membership of the Cobb-Marietta Coliseum and Exhibit Hall Authority.

A site for women’s fast pitch softball for the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta was reported in the Sunday, Feb. 7, 1993 paper as being considered at four locations – including west Cobb’s Al Bishop Softball Complex. Before the site decision could be made, details between the Olympic committee and the softball federation had to be worked out.

The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG) was also considering Cobb’s Galleria Centre as a site for team handball and badminton. The two sports were originally planned to be played in the proposed $155 million Phase Four of the World Congress Center until Gov. Zell Miller decided in December 1992 not to fund the expansion.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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Carol Poirier
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February 07, 2013
Enjoy Damon's blog...good job!

The 1993 Dobbins Crash
by Damon_Poirier
February 05, 2013 10:20 AM | 1403 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
On Wednesday, Feb. 3, 1993, the seven-man crew of a Lockheed test airplane died when it crashed after takeoff from Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Marietta.

Killed in the crash were pilot, George D. Mitchell, 42, of Marietta; co-pilot, Olin L. Bankhead Jr., 49, of Marietta; flight engineer, Malcolm J. Davis, 49, of Marietta; flight test engineer, Troy C. Castona, 33, of Smyrna; flight engineer, Veda Ruiz, 46, of Kennesaw; research engineer, William B. Southerland, 49, of Smyrna; and flight test engineer, Alan McLeroy, 35, of Marietta.

The “High Technology Test Bed” (HTTB) was built in 1971 as an L-100 – which was the civilian version of the C-130 Hercules military transport, and later modified into the HTTB in the early 1980s. This one-of-a-kind transport, dubbed a “flying laboratory,” was owned by Cobb-based Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co. and flown by company employees to test their own avionics and electronic systems, as well as systems built by other firms. At the time of the crash, the crew was testing a new rudder-control system.

Witnesses told the Marietta Daily Journal that the plane got airborne around 1:30 p.m., then it appeared to veer to the left to avoid crashing onto the flight line where C-130s, F-15 jet fighters and other aircraft were parked on the tarmac. After the turn, the plane reportedly nose-dived to the ground just barely clearing a stand of pine trees and a short radar tower before crashing onto an access road a quarter-mile from the runway and about 150 yards from a vacant recreation area.

The plane came to a stop 25 feet from the Navy medical clinic operated by Naval Air Station-Atlanta, which was set ablaze by the crash. The plane also clipped an ambulance that was in a parking lot. The clinic was quickly doused with water and foam by firefighters to contain the flames. All 50 people inside escaped unhurt.

The force of the impact ripped the wings free from the plane. The front third of the fuselage was twisted, while the rear two-thirds remained relatively in tact.

Amateur video shot by someone at Dobbins and shown to the newspaper revealed bright orange flames and thick black smoke that quickly consumed the plane. Afterwards the entire plane was charred so badly that its markings could barely be seen. The black plume of smoke was reported as being visible for up to 15 miles away.

The crash also happened right after the retirement luncheon for Dobbins Fire Chief Jimmy Gilbert. Gilbert, who was being honored by fellow firefighters on his last day with the department. Gilbert had just returned to work when the warning bells sounded the plane crash. Within 90 seconds, his first fire unit was at the scene and was later assisted by units from Cobb County and Smyrna fire departments.

The crash was the third time in less than five years that a plane based at Dobbins Air Reserve Base had been involved in a fatal crash.

In November 1989, an A-7E Corsair Navy jet from Naval Air Station-Atlanta crashed into a Smyrna apartment complex while on approach to the runway at Dobbins, killing two people. The Corsair was on a routine training mission when the pilot, who survived the crash, mistakenly shut off fuel to the single-engine jet and could not reignite the engine.

In December 1988, a Dobbins-based Georgia Army National Guard reconnaissance plane narrowly missed several homes before crashing into a heavily wooded area of Cherokee County. The pilot of the Grumman OV-1D, dubbed “The Widowmaker” by aviators who flew the now-grounded twin-engine turboprop aircraft, died in the crash.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com. 

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The Week of January 31st
by Damon_Poirier
January 30, 2013 04:39 PM | 1046 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at gun violence, deaths from exposure and a proposed granite monument at Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park.

50 years ago …

A gunman was reported in the Sunday, Jan. 27, 1963 MDJ as having jumped out of a car on U.S. 41 north of Marietta armed with a pistol and threatened to shoot a young hitchhiker if he didn’t have at least $100. The victim was shot and seriously wounded when he darted across the highway in an attempt to escape, the gunman who stole $8 and his suitcase.

This was the second shooting in the county over the weekend. A 16-year-old Smyrna youth was also hit in the hip by a bullet which ripped through the side of a car carrying seven teenagers. The shooter told police that he had fired at the car with the idea of frightening the youths away.

It was also reported that day, that an elderly Austell woman was found frozen to death the day before just a short distance from her Maxham Road home. Relatives of the woman said she was discovered in a field about 150-feet from her house where she apparently collapsed the night before.

Later in the week, in the Thursday, Jan. 31, 1963 paper, a second exposure death was reported. In that case, the body of a 36-year-old Atlanta woman was discovered by two hunters in a field in a remote section of the county. Medical examiners at Kennestone Hospital said that the young woman died of exposure a week to 10 days before the discovery.

Firemen from South Cobb and other neighboring counties were reported in the Monday, Jan. 25, 1963 paper as having rushed to Douglasville over the weekend to battle a two-building fire that threatened a block of businesses on the east side of town. Douglasville Fire Chief W.C. McLarty told the paper that six fire departments, including three from Cobb, and a number of off-duty firemen came to the aid of his volunteer unit.

Another story that day reported funds were being sought from the state legislature by Rep. A.A. Fowler Jr. of Douglas County to erect a $6,500 granite monument in memory of the Georgians who died in the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain. The monument would occupy a place of honor at what is now the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park.

The project was backed by Mrs. Forrest Kibler of Atlanta, chairman of the Georgia Hall of Fame committee, who said that there were no monuments to Georgia’s dead while the state of Illinois had a monument to their dead at the mountain. Mrs. Kibler also said that the proposed monument was one in a series of monuments placed in recent years at Civil War battle sites such as Gettysburg, Antietam and Vicksburg.

A playful 18-month-old boxer named Champ, described as “the pet of the whole block,” was reported in the Tuesday, Jan. 29, 1963 paper as horribly burned the day before when someone threw lye on him and blinded one of his eyes.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, Jan. 25, 1993 MDJ, Marietta Schools Superintendent Dr. Roy D. Nichols was reported as having announced at a press conference in Norfolk, Va., the night before that he was accepting the position of superintendent of the Norfolk City School District. The announcement came just a few days after three members of the Norfolk Board of Education came to Marietta to tour Marietta High and A.L. Burruss Elementary schools and talk with Marietta School Board members.

Also that day, Cobb Hospital and Medical Center in Austell and Kennestone Hospital in Marietta announced they hoped to break ground on a new shared laundry facility that was to be built at 1011 Williams Drive, a 6.96-acre lot near Interstate 75 and Canton Highway in north Cobb. The $2.6 million cost would be shared equally by both hospitals.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of January 24th
by Damon_Poirier
January 22, 2013 06:04 PM | 1069 views | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at a birthday celebration for a Confederation general, record cold weather and options regarding the West Cobb Loop.

100 years ago…

It was reported, in the Friday, Jan. 24, 1913 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier, that on the Sunday before the First Baptist Church’s Sunday school room had a large gathering of the congregation celebrating the birthday of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. A portrait of the general was drawn upon the room’s blackboard, which was draped with Confederate flags. The opening song in the celebration was one of Gen. Lee’s favorite hymns, “How Firm a Foundation.”

W.H. Bivins’ store in the Elizabeth community was reported that week as having been burned to the ground. Bivins said that he had received several letters threatening to burn his store unless he fired his black employees, but he had not taken the matter seriously. It was also reported that several other stores in the area had received similar threatening letters.

There was also a story that week about a movement to send the Marietta Rifles to Washington, D.C., to take part in the inauguration exercises in March. Several cities and towns across Georgia were raising money to send their military post groups. Rome was cited as raising $1,500 to send a company from its neighboring Lindale community. Meanwhile, only $500 was being sought for the Marietta Rifles. The military group said that the raised money would only be spent on railroad fare, while the individual men would pay for their own food and the group would arrange to sleep in a school house.

50 years ago…

It was reported, in the Monday, Jan. 21, 1963 MDJ, that centuries old rare coins valued at approximately $600 and a .41-caliber collector’s pistol were stolen by a thief over the weekend from an east Marietta store. Included in the loot were 12 Spanish “pieces of eight” with identifying marks showing use in Hong Kong, several 1600-era Roman coins, seven U.S. silver dollars minted in the early 1800s and a 1931 U.S. penny. The thief apparently only selected the rarest coins from those on display.

The Cobb County Hospital Authority, in the Wednesday, Jan. 23, 1963 paper, learned that a proposed 200-bed hospital in south Cobb would cost between $4.5 and $5 million – nearly double the estimated figure of the originally planned 150-bed unit. Authority members were also told that if plans went to the drawing board that very day the project would still not be ready for at least two years.

A blast of Arctic air and bone-chilling wind was reported, in the Thursday, Jan. 24, 1963 paper, as plunging temperatures to an official four degrees below zero. It was, at that time, the coldest temperature in the metro Atlanta area for the century. The then-official, all-time low for the Atlanta area was an eight and a half degree below zero reading and a 10-below mark specifically in Cobb County on Feb. 13, 1899.

Sheriff Kermit Sanders said, in the Friday, Jan. 25, 1963 paper, a specially-trained team of detectives to probe major crimes was expected to be formed as part of a reorganization of the Cobb County Sheriff’s Department. Sanders also said he was planning a number of changes in the operation of his department after the county advisory board transferred the county’s seven-man detective force under his command the day before. Commissioner Herbert McCollum said that a trained detective would now be on call 24 hours a day with county police handling all traffic patrols and regular police duties except investigations.

20 years ago…

Assembly began at Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co. on what would be the first of eight P-3 Orion submarine hunters that were to be delivered to the South Korean air force in 1995 as part of a $595 million contract awarded in December 1990, according to the Thursday, Jan. 21, 1993 MDJ. The first stage of the major assembly was a cockpit that would be outfitted with state-of-the-art avionics.

Also on that day, Cobb Commission Chairman Bill Byrne and Commissioner Bill Cooper said that they supported building a new $37 million road to complete the West Cobb Loop. Both said they favored building the road through a relatively undeveloped area beside Noses Creek over a less-expensive option of widening West Sandtown Road.

At an informational meeting the month before, 152 of 241 residents voted in favor of the Noses Creek option. The others divided their votes among four other options presented by the Cobb Department of Transportation.

The commission would eventually choose the 5.5-mile Noses Creek option, which crossed some 15 acres of federal wetlands and required bridge crossings, which connected the East-West Connector in Austell with the Ernest Barrett Parkway Extension in Kennesaw.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com. 

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The Week of January 17th
by Damon_Poirier
January 16, 2013 11:23 AM | 1095 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at pinball machines as gambling devices, a local lawmaker coming under enemy sniper fire in Somalia and the governor’s attempt to change the state flag.

100 years ago …

Taking up half of the front page of the Friday, Jan. 17, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, was a letter from Marietta Mayor J.J. Black on the financial state of the city. The letter said that the city’s income had not covered expenses and that debt was just being added to debt year after year.

The second page of that week’s edition showed a half-page graphic with financial statements citing information from the administrations of former Mayors Dobbs and Clay alongside Mayor Black’s. The remainder of the page was taken up by an ad from the Chamber of Commerce urging citizens to attend a 7:30 p.m. joint meeting of the Chamber and the city council that night at the Kennesaw House to discuss the city’s finances.

50 years ago …

A lifeline to pull in more revenue for Marietta schools in case federal impact aid was cut off for the 1963 school year was added to the city’s rules, according to the Sunday, Jan. 13, 1963 MDJ. The city council voted 5-1 to raise the allowable school tax ceiling on private property and to let the school fund donations by the city-owned Board of Lights and Water Works be raised.

Police said, in the Tuesday, Jan. 15, 1963 paper, that they attempted to stop a driver for a routine traffic offense in Marietta, but the car raced off and started a high-speed chase through the downtown area. The chase, which reached speeds of 75-80 mph, ended when the driver hit a patch of ice and his car skidded into a utility pole. A search of the vehicle turned up one and a half gallons of non-tax-paid moonshine whiskey and a concealed .38-caliber pistol under the dashboard.

Another story that day reported that the city of Kennesaw’s Police Chief W.J. Freeman had resigned after city officials announced their intention of cutting his pay from $5,720 a year to $4,500.

In the Wednesday, Jan. 16, 1963 paper, soaring flames were reported to have destroyed a building containing three businesses – Beets Barber Shop, a beauty shop and a washateria – in the Elizabeth community, located along the Church Street Extension corridor near Kennestone Hospital. The pre-dawn fire, with 30-foot flames, burned through an overhead cable and disrupted local phone service for most of the day.

A court decision that pinball machines awarding free games were gambling devices was reported as being allowed to stand by the State Supreme Court, in the Thursday, Jan. 17, 1963 paper. The Supreme Court’s action allowed Georgia’s law officers to stamp out pinball machine operations as a violation of the state’s anti-gambling statutes.

20 years ago …

U.S. Rep. George “Buddy” Darden, D-Marietta, was reported in the Monday, Jan. 11, 1993 MDJ, as being among a group of congressmen in Mogadishu, Somalia, who came under enemy sniper fire during the first visit by U.S. lawmakers since the start of Operation Restore Hope.

Snipers began shooting as the congressional delegation arrived at one of Mogadishu’s hot spots, a sports stadium where 1,500 U.S. Marines were encamped along the Green Line that divided the city between rival clans. Marine riflemen took up positions behind stacks of sandbags as the congressmen were rushed from their vehicles into rooms beneath the stadium.

Several Cobb legislators, in the Wednesday, Jan. 13, 1993 paper, said they were taken aback by Gov. Zell Miller’s impassioned plea to change the Georgia state flag during his annual State of the State address to the General Assembly. Most members of the Cobb delegation said they wanted a statewide, public referendum on the controversial issue, while the governor was pushing for a legislative vote to remove the Confederate battle emblem from the flag.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com. 

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The Week of January 10th
by Damon_Poirier
January 09, 2013 03:46 PM | 1290 views | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at proposed rapid transit, important legislative decisions and wind damage to the Big Chicken.

100 years ago …

On the front page of the Friday, Jan. 10, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there were reports published from the various offices within Marietta government for December 1912.

The City Clerk reported collections of $10,476.77 for property taxes, $2.50 for a street tax, $95 for a special tax, $39 from the City Sexton and $166.50 for cemetery lots.

The City Marshal reported having made 73 cases with 15 discharged and 58 fined. While the Chief of the Fire Department reported 28 fire calls for the entire year.



There was also a front page ad that week from Northern Pacific Railroad about the Jan. 20th arrival at the L. & N. Depot in Marietta of their 75-foot railroad car specially designed and decorated to exhibit products raised by farmers and fruit growers in Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Washington and Oregon.

50 years ago …

An article, in the Sunday, Jan. 6, 1963 MDJ, stated that rapid transit from downtown Marietta to downtown Atlanta could take 25 minutes and cost riders only 45-cents, but the catch was that it wouldn’t be available until January 1980 and only if construction of the lines went as planned.

Marietta was the farthest stop from the proposed Atlanta transit center on any of the seven planned lines. The northwest line was also the longest, 18.3 miles, and the costliest at $54.9 million, not accounting for inflation.

Cobb’s state legislators were reported, in the Tuesday, Jan. 8, 1963 paper, as almost having agreed to abolish an old legislature rule that gave each delegate the power to single-handedly kill a local bill. Several members of Cobb’s five-man delegation declared in a forum the day before sponsored by the Marietta PTA Council that they would favor changing “legislative courtesy.” Rep. Joe Mack Wilson, however, squashed the idea stating that he favored unanimous consent among the delegation before allowing local bills on the floor.

Also that day, the Smyrna City Council allocated $100,000 of its street bond funds for the purchase of the right-of-ways in two long-sought highway projects – the widening of Old Highway 41 to four lanes and the relocation of Spring Street.

The FBI, in the Thursday, Jan. 10, 1963 paper, said they arrested three men in connection with the Oct. 22, 1962 theft of a $19,296 shipment of whiskey, gin and vodka. Agents found the truck, missing its shipment, abandoned and empty behind a truck stop on Highway 41 in Cobb County on the day of the theft.

Two teenage boys were reported, in the Friday, Jan. 11, 1963 paper, as sentenced to two consecutive life terms each after pleading guilty to shooting a gas station attendant in a Thanksgiving Eve robbery. Cobb Superior Court Judge James T. Manning told the defendants that the state had the right to sentence them to death but because of the boys’ good record up until the time of the crime he was only going to give them life sentences.

Also that day, Lockheed air crafters began putting together the “body” of the Air Force’s C-141 turbofan aerial giant ahead of schedule. The forward, center and rear body sections of the new plane were placed in a tremendous mating jig to be riveted together. The move was 25 days ahead of schedule for the aft fuselage and 11 days early for the other two fuselages.

20 years ago …

In the Thursday, Jan. 7, 1993 MDJ, it was reported that U.S. Reps. George “Buddy” Darden of Marietta and John Lewis of Atlanta sided with House Democratic leaders in expanding congressional voting rights for the delegates from Washington, D.C., and four U.S. commonwealths. House Minority Whip Newt Gingrich, R-east Cobb, led the fight against approval and angrily pointed out that citizens of the four provinces – Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa and Guam – paid no taxes to the federal treasury, yet they would have the same representation in the House as the residents of Georgia.

Also that day, Kentucky Fried Chicken officials were reported as saying that the 30-year-old Big Chicken would be restored after a rectangular hole was ripped in the Roswell Road side of the landmark structure at the corner of Highway 41 by strong winds the previous weekend.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com. 

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The Week of January 3rd
by Damon_Poirier
December 31, 2012 10:17 AM | 1144 views | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at annexation attempts in both Smyrna and Marietta along with developments in the investigation of the Sara Tokars’ shotgun murder.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Jan. 3, 1913 Marietta Journal and Courier, the entire front page held an ad from the T.L. Wallace Clothing Company thanking friends and customers for their patronage.

There was also a story that week about how a woman on Christmas morning was cranking her automobile in front of a residence on Kennesaw Avenue when the handle flew back and broke her right arm in two places. Dr. Howard Perkinson attended the woman and quickly had her fractures reduced and bound.

Another story told how the Gignilliat property, which had a five to six room house that sat on two to three acres of land, was going to be auctioned off the following Tuesday.

50 years ago …

The Cobb Advisory Board was reported, in the Wednesday, Jan. 2, 1963 MDJ, as having voted to buy the part-time services of Marble J. Hensley of Chattanooga, Tenn., as a professional planning engineer who would review zoning change applications. He was also to gather data in preparation for the county’s setting up of a full-time planning department.

Also that day, more than 100 people lined up outside the motor vehicle license tag office in Marietta to buy the new red and white lettered 1963 Georgia tags.

Residents of a sprawling southwest Smyrna area overwhelmingly rejected a proposal to annex into the city in an unofficial straw vote that was reported in the Friday, Jan. 4, 1963 paper. Somewhat stunned Smyrna officials reacted to the lopsided decision by declaring that new fees might be considered for city services provided to many of the 1,200 residents in the area.

Mayor Jake Ables said he believed the vote doomed city expansion into the area during his administration. But, he declared that the area was bordered by the city on three sides and would eventually be swallowed up and automatically annexed.

Another annexation story that day featured the boundaries of the city of Marietta growing by some 40 acres after it annexed six separate tracts. City officials had already okayed the taking of the property, but actual annexation depended upon the Cobb legislative delegation amending the Marietta charter at the upcoming session of the General Assembly. The largest of the tracts was some 25 acres in the then yet-to-be developed Whitlock Valley subdivision, located in west Marietta off Kirkpatrick Drive.

20 years ago …

In the Friday, Jan. 1, 1993 MDJ, Fred Tokars denied any involvement in the Nov. 29 shotgun murder of his wife, Sara, and begged reporters to quit hounding him and his two sons. Meanwhile, the two men charged with the murder were scheduled to appear for a preliminary hearing before Cobb Chief Magistrate James Bodiford. Cobb investigators and District Attorney Tom Charron said that they also considered Fred Tokars a suspect.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com. 

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The Week of December 27
by Damon_Poirier
December 24, 2012 10:12 AM | 1300 views | 0 0 comments | 23 23 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at Christmas power outages, train wrecks and developments in the sale of the Kennesaw House.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Dec. 27, 1912 Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page ad that published expressions of thanks to the people of Marietta and Cobb County from the merchants and business men of Marietta that advertised in the newspaper during the year.

50 years ago …

A member of the Cobb Advisory Board called, in the Monday, Dec. 24, 1962 paper, for a speeding up of a long-range plan to extend water lines down the western side of the county. At the time, most west Cobb residents were depending on private wells. Ordinary Garvis Sams, who made the proposal, said the county should also consider acquiring easements for laying sewer lines in conjunction with the new water lines.

Also that day, the entire city of Acworth was reported as blacked out for 30 minutes the morning before when a car hit a utility pole on Southside Drive. Crews from the city Water and Lights Department put up a new pole.

During the outage, one woman called the fire department in distress stating that her Christmas turkey was cooking when the lights went out.

In the Wednesday, Dec. 26, 1962 paper, more than 3,000 Cobb County and City of Marietta homes were reported as not having power for up to five hours on Christmas Day as freezing rain weighed down power lines and snapped off tree limbs. Heads of both the county and city electrical departments said the power outages were the worst for any Christmas Day that they could recall.

On the heels of the Dec. 3 train derailment in Kennesaw carrying atomic materials for the AEC, that was mentioned in an earlier column, another train derailment occurred in Kennesaw. Twelve of the southbound 76-car Louisville and Nashville freight train derailed on Thursday, Dec. 27, 1962 in the heart of the city after an automobile rammed into the side of one of the cars at fog-blanketed Moon’s Crossing.

Rail cars loaded with cargo were thrown along the tracks near the historic depot in the center of town. Two men traveling in the automobile were injured in the mishap, but reported in good condition at Kennestone Hospital.

Cobb police were reported in the Friday, Dec. 28, 1962 paper, as searching for a slender young bandit who calmly drank a bottle of milk at a grocery store before drawing a pistol and robbing the operator of $162.

In the Sunday, Dec. 30, 1962 paper, it was reported that an automobile carrying two people crashed through the guard rail of the bridge on Old Highway 41 that spanned the Louisville and Nashville railroad tracks north of the Chattahoochee River. The automobile plunged 40 feet to the railroad tracks below and then was hit by a passing freight train. Both passengers survived the mishap, but were severely injured.

20 years ago …

Two men were arrested and charged with the murder in the shooting death of 39-year-old Sara Tokars of east Cobb in the Thursday, Dec. 24, 1992 MDJ. The arrests were announced by Chief of Detectives A.B. Allread at a news conference at the Cobb police headquarters. Police declined to say which of the two men acted as the lone gunman who shot Tokars in front of her two young sons as she drove along Powers Road in east Cobb.

After months of eager waiting, the Downtown Marietta Development Authority in the Thursday, Dec. 31, 1992 paper, was expected to close on the sale of the historic Kennesaw House. At a specially called meeting the day before, DMDA officials unanimously approved a 15-year loan with Barnett Bank for $550,000 that would allow the self-taxing group to purchase the house that sits on the Marietta Square. The house was being bought from Boston-based firm, Petrous & Co., for $25,000.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com. 

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