MDJ Time Capsule by Damon_Poirier
This week’s Time Capsule looks at a gas plant, a bomb threat, Viet Nam, parking meters and a hostage situation.
February 14, 2016 01:00 AM | 279329 views | 0 0 comments | 5109 5109 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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The Week of Feb. 11
by Damon_Poirier
February 12, 2016 12:20 PM | 17 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
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This week’s Time Capsule looks at a gas plant, a bomb threat, Viet Nam, parking meters and a hostage situation.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Feb. 11, 1916, edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a front page article about the citizens of Marietta having the possibility to vote on a natural gas plant franchise. An application for the franchise was “filed with the city council by H.N. Randolph, M.R. McClatchey of Fulton County and Col. Fred Morris of Marietta.” At the time, it was required by the law that these franchises be voted on by the people. The applicants planned on buying a site for the plant, beginning construction within six months and supplying natural gas to customers within a year and a half from the grant of the franchise.

♦♦♦

Another story announced that the Library Committee of the Civic League was “planning a Book Donation Party for the library on Feb. 26.” Duplicate books and those no longer useful to the library were to be sold for 10- to 25-cents.

50 years ago …

In the Monday, Feb. 7, 1966, Marietta Daily Journal there was a story a telephoned bomb threat being made to the South Cobb Fire Department against South Cobb High School in Austell. The threat was one more in a recent wave of bomb threats that had plagued the school system, which were first mentioned in the Nov. 12 MDJ Time Capsule.

♦♦♦

The Cobb County Civil and Criminal Court was reported in the Tuesday, Feb. 8, 1966, paper as getting a second judge through a bill introduced in the Georgia House by Rep. Bob Howard. At the time, Howell Ravan was the only judge in the court established in 1965 to handle misdemeanor cases. Rep. Howard said that his bill, which was in coordination with a state-wide bill already introduced, would “lead to a traffic violation bureau for the county, with Judge Ravan and the second judge being able to substitute for each other if necessary.”

♦♦♦

Another story that day, reported that the Powder Springs City Council was seeking an “unusual provision” in a House bill. The council was asking for legislation prohibiting people whose city taxes were not paid up from being eligible to vote in city elections.

♦♦♦

There was also a photo on the front page of that edition of a monument in the state House dedicated to a dead coon dog named Cleo. Rep. Jamie W. Oglesby of Thomasville donated the monument and brought it by the House of Representatives for inspection. Cleo, owned by Willard York of Sautee in White County, had been shot by a state game ranger and the state had to pay York $300 for the “wrongful shooting.”

♦♦♦

More than 500 cars were reported in the Wednesday, Feb. 9, 1966, paper as being expected to head to Atlanta from Cobb County to participate in “Affirmation: Viet Nam,” which was first mentioned in the Jan. 14 MDJ Time Capsule.

Leading the motorcade was former Marietta resident and Gen. Lucius Clay. Two other planes carrying groups of ambassadors and congressmen were expected to land at Dobbins Air Force Base minutes after Clay’s plane and join the caravan. The Cobb County Republican Association had also sponsored a second motorcade led by State Rep. Ben C. Jordan from the Belmont Hills Shopping Center.

The mayors of Cobb’s municipalities endorsed the movement and most of them were expected to ride in the motorcade. The Cobb County Board of Commissioners were said to have approved a resolution supporting the movement. Commissioner Tommy Brown said that he would ride in the motorcade with Clay and that Commission Chairman Ernest Barrett had also been invited to ride with the general.

♦♦♦

In the Thursday, Feb. 10, 1966, paper it was reported that the poles that held over 350 parking meters in the downtown Marietta area a year ago were being removed. The meters had been removed as an attempt to encourage downtown shopping.

20 years ago …

A gas station in Powder Springs was reported in the Tuesday, Feb. 6, 1996, paper as being the scene where “police officials from five jurisdictions tried to piece together the details of a high-speed chase that began with a hostage situation and ended with two people shot.” The alleged perpetrator and one of his hostages were wounded during the incident which involved the Georgia State Patrol, the Douglas County Sheriff’s Department and police from Douglasville, Cobb County and Powder Springs. The situation evolved from a domestic dispute at the Holiday Inn Express at Westmoreland Plaza near I-20 in Douglasville.

♦♦♦

A photo in the Thursday, Feb. 8, 1996, paper showed former Prime Minister of Great Britain Margaret Thatcher standing with Bill Dahlberg, president/CEO of the Southern Co., before she accepted the 1996 Nation’s Honor Award from U.S. Sen. Paul Coverdell, R-Atlanta. Coverdell, who was in Washington, D.C., to vote on the Farm Bill, honored Thatcher at the Stouffer Renaissance Waverly Hotel in the Cumberland area for “her competence, her graciousness, her eloquence” as part of the award for individuals whose efforts have benefitted America.

♦♦♦

A second item in that paper reported that State Rep. Mitchell Kaye’s internet home page had “drawn the ire of top Democratic leaders” along with some Republicans who charged that it “could mislead users” into believing that it was an official, state-sanctioned website. The lawmakers were upset over the east Cobb Republican’s prominent use of the Georgia seal and the title “The Georgia House of Representatives Home Page” on the site he opened five weeks earlier. The site provided “a daily synopsis of House proceedings, breakdowns of key Republican legislation and links to other conservative-leaning and liberal-leaning websites.”

♦♦♦

In the Saturday, Feb. 10, 1996, paper it was reported that President Bill Clinton promised to fight in Congress and the courts “against a new requirement to discharge military personnel with the AIDS virus.” But aides said the administration would still enforce the provision which was in a bill that Clinton was to sign that day. The requirement was “unconstitutional, offensive and cruel,” the president said. Clinton ordered the Justice Department not to defend the provision’s constitutionality in the courts and White House officials predicted that if Congress did not repeal it, the Supreme Court would throw it out.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Feb. 4
by Damon_Poirier
February 07, 2016 01:00 AM | 738 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
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This week’s Time Capsule looks at some ads, annexations, TIME magazine, an evacuation and Civil War fortifications.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Feb. 4, 1916, edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a front page article that reported that “Mr. William Asbury Bishop, chief of police, in his new blue uniform with its brass buttons and insignia of office on his cap” was not recognizable “as ’Bill Bishop’ who used to drive a fine horse leisurely about town on his business of collecting rents.”

♦♦♦

There was also a very small front page ad that read – “Lost – Silver card case, name Mrs. E.L. Stringer engraved on it, finder may keep money if will return purse to Marietta Book Store.”

♦♦♦

On the second page was a story about “C.W. Fowler, who has made quite a record as a fine hog breeder in Cobb County” having taken charge of the Shedden Farm. The property was owned by H.F. Shedden of Atlanta who also had the town of Raymond being built there. Fowler was to manage the farm and “specialize in Duroe Jersey hogs and Short Horn beef cattle.”

♦♦♦

Another ad in that paper was titled, “Health for Sick Women,” and announced that “For Forty Years Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound Has Been Woman’s Most Reliable Medicine.” The medicine was supposed to cure women who were “suffering from some form of woman’s special ills, and having a constant fear of breaking down” and featured three positive testimonies.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Jan. 30, 1966, Marietta Daily Journal there was a story about Fulton County Sen. Dan MacIntyre having moved to kill a constitutional amendment that if approved would “make it virtually impossible for Atlanta to annex territory in Cobb County.” MacIntyre’s resolution requested that the cities of Atlanta and Roswell be allowed to vote on the local constitutional amendment that Cobb County voters were expected to approve in November 1966.

♦♦♦

The death 35-year Cobb County resident Mrs. Arna Buice Carter, 102, was reported in the Wednesday, Feb. 2, 1966, paper. Mrs. Carter, “who was reading the daily newspaper from cover to cover and doing quilting and fancy needlework without glasses until six months ago,” was fondly known as “Granny” and died in a convalescent home.

Born in Atlanta during the Civil War, Mrs. Carter “lived in a storm cellar during the shelling and burning of Atlanta by Gen. Sherman. During cease fire orders by Gen. Sherman on Sundays, Mrs. Carter’s mother would leave the storm cellar to cook enough food to last until the following Sunday.”

The article said that some of Mrs. Carter’s earliest memories were of “the great well at Five Points and the hitching posts at every corner. The first street car she remembered was a horse drawn car which went down Peters Street to the old Yankee barracks, later known as Ft. McPherson.”

♦♦♦

In the Thursday, Feb. 3, 1966, paper the current edition of TIME magazine was reported as listing the Marietta Daily Journal as “one of the fastest growing suburban daily newspapers in the United States.”

The article in the magazine said “Suburbanites who once read two metropolitan dailies – morning and afternoon – now tend to drop the afternoon in favor of the suburban daily. In fast-growing Cobb County, 15 miles northwest of Atlanta, people often bypass the afternoon Atlanta Journal for the local Marietta Journal, which generally runs as much national and international news as the Atlanta paper does, and much more Cobb County news.”

♦♦♦

The House Highway Committee was reported in the Friday, Feb. 4, 1966, paper as having killed “a bill to name a railroad overpass at Smyrna after former three-time mayor J.M. “Hoot” Gibson. The measure “sponsored by Cobb Sen. Ed Kendrick, passed without opposition in the Senate” but was opposed by two Cobb representatives in the House.

20 years ago …

Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, R-east Cobb, was reported in the Monday, Jan. 29, 1996, paper as having “delivered a moving speech in the memory of his former press secretary and former state Rep. Jack Vaughan Jr.” Gingrich addressed a capacity crowd who gathered for the dedication of Chattahoochee Technical Institute’s then-latest building.

The Jack Vaughan Jr. Classroom Building was “a $3.7 million, 40,000-square-foot structure on the main campus.” Gingrich said it was appropriately named for a man who “cherished the chance to represent and serve the people of Cobb County.”

A sixth-generation Cobb Countian, Vaughan died after a four-year bout with cancer in 1994 at the age of 33.

♦♦♦

A chemical leak at a north Marietta plant was reported in the Tuesday, Jan. 30, 1996, paper as having “prompted the evacuation of hundreds of residents and workers in the area as well as the closure of four major thoroughfares while Marietta and Cobb County firefighters worked to contain the spill.”

The early morning incident at Rhone-Poulenc Specialty Chemicals resulted in six people being sent to the hospital for eye and lung irritation. When Marietta firefighters arrived at the plant they were said to have “encountered a nearly 100-foot tall cloud of sulfur dioxide” hovering over the plant.

♦♦♦

In the Wednesday, Jan. 31, 1996, paper it was reported that Cobb County officials “were undecided on what to do with more than 100 acres of land along the Chattahoochee River etched with historically significant earthen Civil War fortifications.” The land contained the southern end of Confederate Gen. Joseph Johnston’s “River Line,” a 4.5-mile long series of “trenches that were never attacked during Union Gen. William T. Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign” because they were considered “virtually impregnable.”

While the area was overgrown, “the series of trenches, foundations for log forts and artillery positions are clearly visible along the bank of the Chattahoochee near Nickajack Creek in extreme southwest Cobb.” County officials were considering the idea of making a park out of the site, but wanted “to do so in a way that will honor the area’s place in history without drawing so many people that traffic destroys it.”

♦♦♦

A bill reported in the Thursday, Feb. 1, 1996, paper passed the state Senate banning all billboards advertising nude dancing clubs. The Senate voted 54-0 to pass the bill, sponsored by Sen. Rooney Bowen, D-Cordele, “banning all billboards promoting nude dancing, regardless of content unless they’re located on the club owners’ property.”

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Jan. 28
by Damon_Poirier
January 31, 2016 01:00 AM | 1613 views | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
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This week’s Time Capsule looks at Gen. Robert E. Lee’s birthday, the NAACP, Lockheed, the Atlanta Falcons, a train derailment, an old law, arson and vandalism.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Jan. 28, 1916, edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a front page article that announced that the birthday of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee “was appropriately celebrated on Jan. 19th, at the home of Mrs. James J. Daniell, on Kennesaw Avenue, by the Daughters of the Confederacy.”

After a business meeting, the group had a program “which did honor to the great Southern leader and the brilliant “Stonewall” Jackson” whose birthday was also in January.”

The event also featured Master James Groves reciting “Jackson’s Way;” Mary Holland giving “The Sword of Lee;” the quartet of Mrs. John Warren, Mrs. C.P. Stephens, Mrs. Kutz and Mrs. J.D. Collins singing old Southern favorites – “Juanita” and “My Old Kentucky Home;” and Ms. Augusta Cohen reading an original essay on Gen. Lee.

♦♦♦

The bottom half of the front page in that edition carried an ad titled, “We Thank You,” from Smith & Ward who were billed as “Leading Grocers of Marietta.”

Some of the ad’s offers were $1.25 for No. 10 White Breast Pure Lard, $1.28 for No. 10 Silver Leaf Lard, $1.32 for No. 10 Cottolene Lard, $1.15 for No. 10 Snowdrift Lard, eight pounds of good Coffee or five pounds of Peebury Coffee for $1, one pound of Luzianne Coffee for 25-cents, one pound of Hero Coffee for 20 cents and 15 pounds of whole grain rice for $1.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Jan. 23, 1966, Marietta Daily Journal there was a front page story about Eddie Campbell, then-19, the “convicted slayer of a service station attendant” beginning his life sentence at the state prison in Reidsville.

Campbell was transferred out of the Cobb County jail by Deputies Elmore Brumbelow and Charles Johnson who reported that Campbell “who vowed he would never go to Reidsville” had slept most of the trip. Campbell was convicted of murdering 58-year-old J.C. Kimsey of Thoni Service Station on the Four Lane, now known as U.S. Highway 41, on July 27, 1965.

♦♦♦

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was reported in the Monday, Jan. 24, 1966, paper as having plans to formally charge Lockheed-Georgia Company with discrimination in the employment of blacks.

Herbert Hill, the secretary for labor programs for the NAACP, said the complaint was to be filed with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and that it was “one of 24 to be filed against firms in Georgia, North Carolina, Texas, Tennessee and New York charging violations of Title 7 of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.”

♦♦♦

The first production orders for the C-5A built by Lockheed Aircraft Corp. of Marietta were reported in the Tuesday, Jan. 25, 1966, paper as being included in the new military budget of President Lyndon B. Johnson.

The budget, submitted to Congress, also included “a provision for increased production of the C-141 jet transport” which was also built at Lockheed. Defense officials said that C-141 production would increase that spring from seven planes a month to nine.

♦♦♦

Herb Hecker, the defensive backfield coach of the Green Bay Packers, was announced in the Wednesday, Jan. 26, 1966, paper as being named the first head coach for the National Football League’s new Atlanta Falcons. Hecker was signed to a four-year contract.

♦♦♦

In the Friday, Jan. 28, 1966, paper it was reported that 22 cars of a Louisville & Nashville freight train carrying sulphuric acid derailed just south of Kennesaw. Several cars with the acid were said to have had ruptured, spilling the acid on the tracks and releasing dangerous fumes.

Units from the Cobb County Civil Defense were called out and “roped off the area to prevent spectators from stepping in the acid.”

The derailment occurred on the main track “between the South switch and Noonday crossing.” No injuries were reported.

♦♦♦

Another story in that paper reported that “for 37 years there has been a law on Georgia’s books requiring teachers to instruct at least 25 minutes a week on game and fish.”

Sen. Ed Kendrick of Cobb County was said to have introduced a bill in the State Senate “to do away with that ‘unenforceable’ requirement” and that it was “a portion of the Georgia school law” which was “put on the books in 1929, back when people were afraid too many birds were being killed off.”

20 years ago …

Fire investigators were reported in the Tuesday, Jan. 23, 1996, paper as seeking the arsonist who “set out to destroy municipal court records by spreading gasoline” and causing a fire that gutted the Acworth municipal court’s office.

The 3:30 a.m. blaze the day before was discovered when a police dispatcher felt the Acworth Police and Court Building shake violently as the gasoline in the court clerk’s office ignited. There were no serious injuries reported and the building’s sprinkler system quickly put out the flames.

♦♦♦

State Rep. George Grindley, R-Marietta, was reported in the Wednesday, Jan. 24, 1996, paper as proposing H.B. 1365, a bill in the Georgia House of Representatives that would require anyone buying tobacco products to furnish identification proving they were of legal age.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Jan. 21
by Damon_Poirier
January 24, 2016 01:00 AM | 402 views | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
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This week’s Time Capsule looks at the Marietta Golf Club, federal funds, Lockheed, bomb scares and open government.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Jan. 21, 1916, edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a front page article that announced a meeting of the Marietta Golf Club in the Marietta City Council Room. The meeting was set to allow members to adopt the club’s by-laws, elect permanent officers and appoint committees. Plans for the clubhouse were said to have been finished and that construction would begin on both it and a man-made lake with an expected completion date of early spring. The golf club would later become the present day Marietta Country Club and move to its current location at 1400 Marietta Country Club Drive NW in Kennesaw.

♦♦♦

A second story in that edition reported that William Tate Holland of the Holland Realty Company had sold the south half of the Henderson block at the corner of Church and Mill streets to Sen. E.P. Dobbs, the former mayor of Marietta. Sen. Dobbs was said to have paid $25,500 to F.G. Marchman. The property had “a frontage of 100 feet on Church Street, and runs back 200 feet along Mill Street to the railroad.”

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Jan. 16, 1966, Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that Cobb County ended “a long era of warrant-type financing” with all but $100,000 of $3.2 million in outstanding warrants turned into Treasurer Horace Groover’s office.

♦♦♦

Sen. Richard B. Russell, who was seeking a sixth full term in 1967 Democratic primary, was reported in the Monday, Jan. 17, 1966, paper as having told the Georgia General Assembly that the state used $2 billion a year in federal funds.

“When broken down on a population basis we stand very near the top among all the 50 states in our per capita share of federal benefits and activities,” said Sen. Russell, who was sharing a platform with Sen. Herman Talmadge.

Both of the conservative senators spoke as Georgia state troopers were said to be guarding the Capitol from possible “Invasion” attempts by “civil rights pickets who clashed with patrolmen” the Friday before.

♦♦♦

Also that day, there was a front page photograph taken at the Lockheed-Georgia Company, which was hosting the annual meeting of the Seventh District Press Association and Seventh District legislators. The meeting began with a tour of the C-141 and C-5A facilities at the Marietta plant and concluded with a dinner out at the Marietta Country Club.

Listed in the photograph were Cobb legislator Bob Howard, former Gov. and then-current gubernatorial candidate Ellis Arnall and his wife, U.S. Seventh District Rep. John Davis, Lt. Gov. Peter Zach Geer, Speaker of the Georgia House George T. Smith and Lockheed President Dick Pulver.

During the meeting, W.B.J. Floyd of the Rome News Tribune was elected president of the Seventh District Press Association, succeeding James Wynn, former editor of The Marietta Daily Journal.

♦♦♦

The Cobb County Commission was reported in the Tuesday, Jan. 18, 1966, paper as having voted “not to develop any regional parks with the $900,000 in bond money approved for park purposes” in July 1965. Plans to establish a 150-acre regional park in South Cobb, which was first mentioned in the Jan. 7 Time Capsule, were dropped after the commission “authorized a parks and recreation committee to proceed to secure options on five sites for neighborhood or community parks.”

♦♦♦

Rep. Joe Mack Wilson was reported in the Wednesday, Jan. 19, 1966, paper as having introduced a constitutional amendment in the House of Representatives that would “allow Cobb citizens to vote in November on establishing a county manager form of government.”

♦♦♦

Sen. Ed Kendrick’s bill making bomb-scare calls to public buildings a misdemeanor was reported in the Friday, Jan. 21, 1966, paper as having passed the Senate. Kendrick said that “the recent bomb scares at various Cobb county schools prompted him to prepare the legislation.” During the fall semester, Cobb County had suffered a rash of “more than 30 bomb scare telephone calls to individual schools, as often as six in one day.” The bomb scares were first mentioned in the Nov. 12 Time Capsule and a case of arson that destroyed Smyrna’s R.L. Osborne Junior High School, which was mentioned in a special Time Capsule column devoted to the event.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, Jan. 16, 1996, paper it was reported how state House Speaker Tom Murphy and House Majority Leader Larry Walker gave into the “ceaseless pressure” from state Rep. Mitchell Kaye (R- east Cobb) and agreed to make tape recordings and/or transcripts of floor debates and committee meetings available to the public. Rep. Kaye had accused Democratic leaders of “acting like censors in the Soviet Union after being denied access to audio tapes of floor debates from the 1995 session and the special redistricting session” which was held in August 1995.

“It’s a very positive start. It’s a small step for open government in the sunshine,” said Rep. Kaye. “Since the [House leaders] could not prevent the dissemination of these recordings anyway, they decided to make them available.”

Under House rules, Rep. Kaye had been told he could get recordings of his own comments, but would have to ask permission from other state lawmakers for their recordings. Later, he had trouble obtaining a tape of a sermon delivered in the House by a rabbi that he had invited.

Because the staff and equipment used to tape the proceedings were paid for by taxpayers, several newspapers across the state ran articles and editorials about the case.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Jan. 14
by Damon_Poirier
January 17, 2016 01:00 AM | 1356 views | 0 0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
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This week’s Time Capsule looks at Confederate pensions, Viet Nam, Southern Tech, Martin Luther King Jr., Lockheed and Newt Gingrich.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Jan. 14, 1916, edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story about how Judge Gann traveled to Atlanta to submit a list of Cobb County Confederate pensions. The county was “ranked third in the number of Confederate veterans entitled to pensions having 322, including 35 invalids, 168 service soldiers and 119 widows.” Judge Gann was expected to receive the pension money sometime in March 1916.

♦♦♦

On the second page of that edition, there was a story about “The Great Diamond Ring Contest,” which was mentioned two weeks ago in Time Capsule.

Just as the nation was waiting to see who would win the recent $1.5 billion Powerball drawing, the City of Marietta was waiting to find out who would win the diamond ring prize. W.A. Florence, serving as the master of ceremonies, combined the 300,000 tickets from the 19 collection boxes.

Elizabeth Northcutt, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Northcutt, was blindfolded on the band stand and drew the ticket belonging to Miss Fannie Lou Webb, a teacher in the city school system.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Jan. 9, 1966, Marietta Daily Journal there was a story about the “Affirmation: Viet Nam” movement.

Remar Sutton Jr. of Marietta and Don Brunson, a college friend from Emory University, were reported as talking about Viet Nam over dinner one evening when Sutton commented that he wanted to show American support of the country’s commitment. The pair spoke with Emory president Sanford S. Atwood and Gov. Carl E. Sanders. Sutton also flew to New York to talk with retired U.S. Army Gen. Lucius D. Clay.

Atwood, Sanders and Gen. Clay supported the project which was to begin “with a public opinion poll being conducted over the state” and would “culminate with an assembly at the Atlanta stadium” on Feb. 12, 1966. Another part of the project was “an educational program in which 40 student leaders are available to talk to any group about why the U.S. got involved in Viet Nam.”

♦♦♦

The Marietta City Council and Mayor Howard Atherton were reported in the Tuesday, Jan. 11, 1966, paper as having notified Gov. Sanders of “’serious deficiencies’ in the construction of the gymnasium at Southern Tech, now known as Southern Polytechnic State University, and urged his assistance in correcting them.”

One of major weaknesses that was discussed was the building’s construction with exposed steel.

City Manager Walter Brown stated that exposed steel construction posed a “rapid collapse” danger during fires and cited the loss of the Larry Bell Auditorium in 1965, which had exposed steel. Brown said that at about 1,300 degrees the steel loses its strength and then “the weight of the building then causes immediate collapse.”

♦♦♦

The Thursday, Jan. 13, 1966, paper reported the death of a three-year-old Acworth boy, first mentioned in the Dec. 24 Time Capsule, who had been receiving treatment at the Shrine Burn Center Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio for burns to 55-percent of his body. The boy’s story which had “touched the hearts of Cobb County residents” was to be buried in the Marietta National Cemetery.

♦♦♦

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife were reported in the Friday, Jan. 14, 1966, paper as having led a two-pronged marched of several black and white sympathizers to the Georgia Capitol to demand the seating of black legislator-elect Julian Bond. About 1,000-people were gathered at the Capitol and scores of state troopers were stationed at the building.

The larger of the two parades, led by Dr. and Mrs. King, started in front of the Atlanta University campus and made a 1.6-mile trek to the Capitol, where legislators had adjourned for the weekend. The second and smaller parade started from Ebenezer Baptist Church and was led by Rev. Fred C. Bennett Jr.

The march was “in protest against the refusal by the Georgia legislature to seat Bond, a young official of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, because he endorsed a SNCC statement accusing the United States of aggression in Viet Nam.” A lawsuit was also filed demanding that Bond be seated.

20 years ago …

Lockheed Martin Corp. was reported in the Tuesday, Jan. 9, 1996, paper as announcing its plans to acquire defense giant Loral Corp. in a $9.1 billion deal, “making the biggest name in aircraft production even bigger and indicating the consolidation trend in the defense industry isn’t slowing down.” The new partnership was expected to form a defense/aerospace company with annual sales of $30 billion.

♦♦♦

In the Thursday, Jan. 11, 1996, paper it was reported that stock prices were tumbling and bonds were plunging the day before following a comment made by House Speaker Newt Gingrich, R-east Cobb, that the federal budget impasse might continue through the November 1996 elections.

“Spooked investors” were putting their money into gold, which was a “traditional safe haven in times of uncertainty.” The move drove up the metal’s price to $400 an ounce, which was the highest in 2½-years.

The Dow Jones Industrial average closed on Wednesday, Jan. 10, 1996, down 97.19 points, or 1.9 percent, at 5,032.94, compounding a 57.55-point drop from Tuesday, Jan. 9, 1996. It was the Dow’s ninth-worst point drop ever and the biggest one day decline since a 101.52-point retreat on Dec. 18, when budget negotiations upset the financial markets.

Investors also dumped treasury bonds. The price benchmark of a 30-year bond fell $11.56 per $1,000 in face value, and its yield rose to 6.19-percent from 6.11-percent.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Jan. 7
by Damon_Poirier
January 11, 2016 01:00 AM | 677 views | 0 0 comments | 24 24 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
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This week’s Time Capsule looks at rapid transit, parks, Six Flags, a rescue mission and background checks for handguns.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Jan. 7, 1916, edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a front page story about how the administration of Marietta Mayor E.P. Dobbs had closed a deal with the trustee of the Kennesaw Paper Company on the night of Friday, Dec. 31, 1915. The agreement stated that the company would “quit the electric light business in Marietta.”

♦♦♦

A second story in that edition reported that Congressman Gordon Lee had come on a special trip to Marietta in order to investigate a situation created by a change in the rural mail carrier routes from Marietta. Lee assured the editor of the Journal that “every effort was being made to re-establish the mail routes.”

Changes to the rural mail service happened after several mail carriers were suspended. Following the implementation of the changes, several families reported they were not getting any mail.

♦♦♦

A third story in that paper reported that the city administration of new Marietta Mayor James R. Brumby Jr. began with a meeting of his council on Monday, Jan. 3, 1916. At the meeting, former Marietta mayor E.P. Dobbs presented to Mayor Brumby and the council figures showing that he had “practically wiped out the indebtedness of the city.”

The new council also began “living up to its platform pledge of open meetings” by inviting the public in to come and hear how the city’s business was being handled.

50 years ago …

In the Tuesday, Jan. 4, 1966, Marietta Daily Journal quoted State Sen. Ben Johnson of DeKalb, author of a 1965 act creating the Rapid Transit Authority, as saying that he would introduce legislation in the upcoming General Assembly that would permit Cobb County to participate in rapid transit, but only if the county picked up its back share of the expense. Cobb’s voters rejected participation in the authority in June 1965 while DeKalb, Fulton, Clayton and Gwinnett counties along with the City of Atlanta voted to join. The project was estimated to eventually cost over $300 million.

♦♦♦

The Cobb County Parks and Recreation Commission and a professional planner were reported in the Wednesday, Jan. 5, 1966, paper as recommending that the county should start acquiring land for a large regional park and five neighborhood parks as first steps in a long-range master plan for development of county-wide recreation facilities. The plan, which was submitted to the County Commission, called for a regional park of about 150 acres to be located in South Cobb and create five neighborhood parks of 25 to 30 acres each. Four of these neighborhood parks were suggested for heavily populated South Cobb and one for north Cobb off of Canton Highway.

♦♦♦

A $7 million dollar family-amusement center, which had originally been planned for development on the Fulton County side of the Chattahoochee River, was reported in the Thursday, Jan. 6, 1966, paper as moving to Cobb where I-20 crosses over the river.

John C. Hunt, vice president of the Great Southwest Atlanta Corp., said his company had purchased a 276-acre tract in the extreme portion of South Cobb and would start building a park modeled on the company’s famous “Six Flags Over Texas” amusement park. The seven parcels of land, on what would become today’s Six Flags Over Georgia, was reported as having cost more than a million dollars.

Hunt said the reason for the shift to Cobb was that the park would have better access to I-20, which would link Atlanta and Birmingham, Alabama once the interstate was completed. A 3,000-acre industrial park, previously announced by Great Southwest, was to remain on the Fulton side between the Chattahoochee River and Fulton Industrial Boulevard, south of the already established Fulton Industrial District.

♦♦♦

In the Friday, Jan. 7, 1966, paper it was reported that a Georgia-built Lockheed HC-130H Hercules aircraft was used on a mission of mercy. The U.S. Air Force’s 57th Air Rescue Squadron in the Azores located and helped recover 31 crewmen from a grounded Liberian freighter.

The ship, the Patadiamandas, was said to have ran aground in heavy fog about 1,000-yards offshore from Flores Island. There were only two life boats available to the crew and nearby vessels were unable to find the freighter in the fog.

Portuguese authorities called in the rescue squadron, which was based at Lajes Field. The squadron sent up its Hercules and within two hours the airplane’s crew spotted the freighter. Radio contact was established with the ship’s crew before the airplane dropped six 20-man life rafts into the sea beside the freighter and began directing two other ships into the area.

20 years ago …

Similar to recent headlines, the Wednesday, Jan. 3, 1996, paper held a story about background checks on firearms.

Some Cobb County gun dealers were interviewed about Georgia’s new instant background check system for handgun sales. The dealers all agreed that the system had some kinks that needed to be worked out, but overall it was expected to “greatly streamline the approval process and may even help boost gun sales.”

The new system involved calling the Georgia Bureau of Investigation to perform a background check on a handgun customer. The GBI had three operators that handled 331 background check requests as of Tuesday, Jan. 2, 1996, compared to the 83 made on New Year’s Day when only a handful of gun dealers were open. Only eight applications had been denied.

The GBI operators were checking federal and state computer records to see if gun buyers had ever been arrested, convicted or were wanted for a felony. Customers were also turned down if the computer showed that they had been involuntarily hospitalized for a mental illness.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Dec. 31
by Damon_Poirier
January 04, 2016 01:00 AM | 554 views | 0 0 comments | 31 31 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
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This week’s Time Capsule looks at an injunction, ads, warrants, a Christmas Eve fire and the world’s population.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Dec. 31, 1915, edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a cotton ginner’s report that announced there were only 18,322 bales of cotton ginned in Cobb County for the year. This was about 5,000 bales less than the previous year.

♦♦♦

A second story in that paper reported that Assistant Attorney General Mark Bolding served The Marietta Journal with “a temporary restraining order preventing the further publication of the legal advertisement [a charter petition] which had been running for three weeks” for the Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company.

The same order was served against L&N Railroad; the Atlanta, Knoxville and Northern Railway; Georgia Secretary of State Philip Cook; State Treasurer William J. Spear; the Marietta Publishing Company and its president Mrs. Josiah Carter, who was also the editor of the Marietta Journal; the Cartersville Printing Company and its president D.B. Freeman, who was also the editor of the Cartersville News; and The Cherokee Advance and its owner/editor John Rudicill.

The order was granted by Judge A.W. Fits of Cartersville and a hearing was set for Jan. 31, 1916. The petition for the order was drawn by Attorney General Clifford Walker under the instructions of Georgia Gov. Nathaniel E. Harris.

♦♦♦

There were also two interesting large ads in that week’s edition.

The entire bottom half of the front page of the paper was taken up by an ad from the Collins Brothers, who were announcing their purchase of Wikle’s Drug Store from Dr. C.A. Wikle. The drugstore was located next door to the First National Bank.

The entire second page of the newspaper was devoted to an ad for “The Great Diamond Ring Contest.”

The ad said that coupon boxes at W.A. Florence Dry Goods Co., T.L. Wallace Clothing Co., The Marietta Journal, Wikle’s Drug Store, Norton Hardware Co., Brumby & Gilbert, the Strand Theatre, the Gem Theatre and several other local businesses would be closed and sealed at noon on Tuesday, Jan. 11, 1916. They would then be turned over to a committee and combined into one box for a drawing at 3 p.m.

Participants received a coupon ticket for every 25-cent purchase or payment on their accounts.

50 years ago …

In the Monday, Dec. 27, 1965, Marietta Daily Journal there was a story update on the three-year-old burn victim that was mentioned in last week’s Time Capsule. The Acworth child’s parents were quoted as saying that their son was doing well at the Shrine burn center hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio.

The child had just undergone the first of several surgeries that would complete the covering of his burns, which covered over 55-percent of his body. Prior to that surgery, the child had been treated at Kennestone Hospital and had a surgery that involved the use of skin from a cadaver.

♦♦♦

In the Wednesday, Dec. 29, 1965, paper it was reported that the Cobb Commission voted to recall the $3.2 million in outstanding tax-free county warrants and refinance the debt with money borrowed from local banks. The action was taken at the commission’s regular meeting when a group of four banks agreed to lend the county money at interest rates of 3.25-percent and 3.30-percent. The interest rate on the warrants was 4-percent.

The four local banks were – the First National Bank of Marietta, Cobb Exchange Bank, the Bank of Smyrna and the South Cobb Bank. County Attorney Sidney Parker estimated the refinancing would save the county $24,000 during 1966.

♦♦♦

Also in that day’s paper, the charges brought by a former officer against Kennesaw Police Chief W.H. Ethridge were reportedly thrown out of court by Judge Howell Ravan for lack of evidence. The officer charged that Ethridge had released a prisoner jailed on a drunken driving charge before the customary four-hour waiting period had elapsed.

20 years ago …

“Bad fortune, bitter wind and a bag of coals” were reported in the Monday, Dec. 25, 1995, paper as having sparked a fire that swept through the River Heights apartment complex on Riverlook Parkway on the morning of Christmas Eve. The fire began on the third floor balcony where residents of an apartment had placed ashes from a fireplace. The 10-unit building in the large River Heights complex was almost completely destroyed despite the efforts of the East Cobb Fire Unit.

♦♦♦

Another story in that paper reported that Marietta’s Merchant Exchange Shopping Center “was preparing for an $18 million facelift.” The 127,000-square foot structure was once the home of Old Country Buffet, Ben Franklin Crafts, Discovery Zone, Luigi’s Pizza and Cineplex Odeon.

Charlotte, North Carolina-based Faison, a commercial property group that managed approximately 58 million square feet of retail, office and industrial properties nationwide, in conjunction with Little & Associates, also of Charlotte, were directing the renovations. Tenant commitments were listed as Harris Teeter, a gourmet grocery store; Drug Emporium; Columbus-based Carmike Cinemas, which was listed as “the largest motion picture provider in the U.S.;” Hancock Fabrics and Bertucci’s restaurant.

♦♦♦

Cobb Commissioner Freeman Poole was reported in the Tuesday, Dec. 26, 1995, paper as still recovering from an abdominal infection.

The commissioner said that he would “remain off duty through the holidays to avoid the stresses of government.” Poole, who dropped by his office at the Cobb County building for the first time in a month, said that doctor’s orders called for him to stay away from the commission meetings and other sources of tension.

In late November, Poole developed an infection of the stomach and intestines that caused his insulin level to drop, giving him a temporary diabetic condition. He checked into the hospital on Monday, Dec. 4, 1995, and spent a week there before being released to homecare.

♦♦♦

In the Thursday, Dec. 28, 1995, paper it was reported that the world’s population had grown by 100 million people to 5.75 billion. Ninety percent of the growth was said to have been in countries with “brutal poverty” and “torn by civil strife and social unrest.”

Werner Fornos of the Population Institute gave the institute’s “1995 World Population Overview” and told reporters in Washington that “effective birth control policies and practices could stabilize world population by 2015 at about 8 billion.” He also said that “unless family planning is promoted actively” there could be an increase of “as many as 14 billion people.”

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Dec. 24
by Damon_Poirier
December 28, 2015 01:00 AM | 793 views | 0 0 comments | 34 34 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
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This week’s Time Capsule looks at Christmas ads, a burn victim, bomb threats, Lockheed’s C-5A and Time’s Man of the Year.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Dec. 24, 1915, edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a front page story about the drowning death of Rev. Furman T. Williams of Cumming.

Witnesses, standing on the bank and unable to render aid, reported that Rev. Williams was crossing Big Creek when “his buggy went down and he was thrown into the cold stream.” He managed to catch the trunk of a small tree and fought for two hours to keep his head just above the 10-foot deep icy currents before being swept downstream.

♦♦♦

A second story listed the event schedule at “the Community Christmas tree” in Glover Park for Christmas Eve. Among them were the singing of the Christmas hymns “It Came Upon the Midnight Clear,” “Hark the Herald Angels Sing” and “Oh Little Town of Bethlehem” with local clergy reading the Lord’s Prayer, a Christmas Prayer and the story of the birth of Christ from St. Luke’s gospel.

♦♦♦

The bottom half of the front page was taken up by an ad for Norton Hardware Company in Marietta that was a last call “for practical, sensible gifts.” Some of the offers listed pocket knives for 25-cents to $3.50, flashlights for 75-cents to $3, nail hammers for 60-cents to $1, “loaded shell” .22-caliber ammunition for 15-cents per box, hand-painted china dessert plates for $1 each, a nutcracker with picks for 25-cents, jewelry boxes for 25-cents to $1, footballs for $1 to $5, roller skates 50-cents to $1.50, air rifles for 50-cents to $3 and wagons for $1 to $2.50.

♦♦♦

Another half-page ad in that edition from automotive agents, Lewis & Butler in Marietta, announced “A Christmas Present for the Whole Family” with the sale of fully-equipped Ford Touring Cars for $440. Other models listed were the Runabout for $390, the Coupelet for $590, the Town Car for $640, the Sedan for $740.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Dec. 19, 1965, paper it was reported an operation “involving the use of skin from the body of a dead man” was performed on a three-year old Acworth boy at Kennestone Hospital. The donated cadaver skin was grafted onto the boy, who had suffered burns to over 55-percent of his body in late November.

The next day, Monday, Dec. 20, 1965, it was reported that the boy was flown to the Shrine Burn Center Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio on an ambulance plane from Dobbins Air Force base for further treatment. Members of the Kennesaw Mountain Shrine Club, together with the boy’s doctor, arranged for trip and hospital admission. Doctors told the boy’s parents that he would be at the Burn Center for about two months.

Members of the Shrine Club said that this was “the first time a child from the Metropolitan Atlanta area has been taken to a burn center for treatment.”

♦♦♦

Also, in the Monday, Dec. 20, 1965, paper it was reported that Marietta’s police department received several calls about “an explosion or noise of undetermined origins.” Police checked all possibilities, but did not find the cause. Dobbins Air Force Base was quoted as saying that it “could have been a sonic boom.”

♦♦♦

Three teenage boys were reported in the Tuesday, Dec. 21, 1965, paper as being arrested by the Cobb Sheriff’s office for calling in bomb threats to East Cobb and Sprayberry High School. A busy phone line was said to have kept a third threat from being made at Marietta High School.

Amos Bates, the new deputy sheriff assigned to schools, said the teens were caught within three hours of making the calls because of “cooperation he received from students at Sprayberry.”

This was just one of many bomb threat incidents in a recent wave that was first mentioned in the Week of Nov. 12 Time Capsule.

♦♦♦

The Defense Department was reported in the Wednesday, Dec. 22, 1965, paper as having officially announced that Lockheed Aircraft Corp. would be getting “the biggest single military contract in history – a $1,363,327,000 job for developers of the world’s largest jet plane.” Under the agreement, the Marietta plant was to build 58 of the new C-5A jet transports. Another $500 million would also be spent on engines for the planes under a separate contract that was awarded to General Electric.

Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara first announced the news on Sept. 30. But several congressmen were investigating “possible leaks of the news before McNamara’s announcement,” which was mentioned in the Week of Nov. 19 Time Capsule. On the day of the announcement, the stocks for Lockheed, Boeing Aircraft Co. and Douglas Aircraft Corp. were said to have fluctuated on the New York Stock Exchange.

20 years ago …

House Speaker Newt Gingrich, R-east Cobb, was reported in the Monday, Dec. 18, 1995, paper as being named Time magazine’s 1995 Man of the Year.

The magazine said that “because of Newt Gingrich, the question is not whether a balanced-budget plan will come to pass, but when.” Less than a year after he “orchestrated Republican’s first takeover of Congress in 40 years,” the magazine said that Rep. Gingrich “has become the greatest liability to the revolution he launched.”

♦♦♦

Also that day, the paper reported that residents of the Chalet Apartments in Marietta called 911 to report shots being fired within the complex. Marietta Police responded to find two brothers involved in what one officer called, “gun play.”

The two men were “shooting aimlessly without a specific target” off of a balcony into the woods behind their building. But, during the investigation, officers found two home-made explosive devices. The Cobb County bomb squad and agents in the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) were called to assist and dispose of the bombs.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Dec. 17
by Damon_Poirier
December 21, 2015 01:00 AM | 1987 views | 0 0 comments | 37 37 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at the Marietta Country Club, roadwork, Tommy Nobis, the anti-gay resolution and the Vinings Pavilion.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Dec. 17, 1915, edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story reporting that a paving bill for the streets of Marietta failed to pass. The bill needed 350 votes and only 286 were cast.

♦♦♦

A second story mentioned the Marietta Golf Club, which would later become the present-day Marietta Country Club, having published a petition in Superior Court the week before for a charter. Once granted, the club would then take four weeks before beginning formal organization. There were about 70 initial charter members who were said to be “the most progressive citizens of the city.”

The story also stated that after the charter was granted, the club “confidently believed that at least 100 members will be secured.” Plans for the club included “a comfortable club house, a lake for swimming and boating, tennis courts and an excellent golf course.”

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Dec. 12, 1965, Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that drivers traveling between the Perimeter Road, now known as I-285, and Smyrna might have a “stone” road replace the existing dirt track. S.P. Allison, an urban engineer and spokesman for the State Highway Department, said he would soon have a “’temporary road’ of crushed stone laid between the Perimeter and Old Spring Road.”

Motorists had to cross either the traffic on the Four Lane, now known as U.S. Highway 41, or travel the dirt track to get into Smyrna. Many drivers were choosing the dirt track because they felt “getting stuck in the mud is preferable to dodging” highway traffic.

♦♦♦

A second story in that edition reported that when the first leg of the new “super highway I-75” opened in the summer of 1966 in Cobb County, the road would “lead from the county line to a point almost five miles north.” The highway would then “stop dead at Roswell Road – 27 feet up in the air.”

Since there wasn’t an exit at Roswell Road to get off the highway, Cobb officials were asking the State Highway Department to put one in. The request was turned down. Instead, the department said they would put up a barricade at the end of the road “to prevent motorists from falling off into space.”

♦♦♦

The “baby Atlanta Falcons of the National Football League” were reported in the Tuesday, Dec. 14, 1965, paper as having signed the nation’s top professional football prospect, Texas linebacker Tommy Nobis – who Marietta’s Tommy Nobis Center is named after. The Falcons reportedly paid $225,000 for Nobis.

♦♦♦

The Marietta Daily Journal announced on the front page of the Wednesday, Dec. 15, 1965, paper as beginning a daily series through Christmas Day “telling how favorite Christmas carols were created.” The series, “A Carol Is Born,” was to be written by Clint Bonner, author of the book, “A Hymn Is Born.” Some of the carols explored in the series were “Away In a Manger,” “Oh, Come All Ye Faithful,” “Joy to the World” and “Silent Night.”

♦♦♦

The Lockheed-Georgia Company announced in the Tuesday, Dec. 16, 1965, paper that it would build a new building that would be “three times the size of a football field” to house the JetStar program. The building was to be constructed near the Lockheed flight line in Marietta and would be 325 feet long by 300 feet wide with nearly 105,000-square feet of floor space underneath a 30-foot high ceiling. The facility would also contain a two-level office complex.

♦♦♦

The Marietta Board of Education announced plans in the Friday, Dec. 17, 1965, paper for the second phase in a million dollar expansion at Marietta High School. Classroom addition plans were expected to be completed for bid letting by June 1, 1966. A half-million dollar gymnasium project was already under construction. The new classrooms were expected to be completed by the 1967-68 school year.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, Dec. 12, 1995, paper it was reported that Cobb County Commission Chairman Bill Byrne said the county would work with Fulton County on how to solve the traffic jams in east Cobb at Johnson Ferry Road, but Cobb would not pay for the construction of a second crossing over the Chattahoochee River. The second crossing was to extend through north Fulton and into Gwinnett County. Some Fulton County commissioners had made their acceptance of the proposed solution contingent on Cobb’s support of the second crossing.

♦♦♦

The following day, Wednesday, Dec. 13, 1995, Byrne was reported as saying that he backed the course being offering by then-Kennesaw State College on gay writers even though he had “become the reluctant spokesman for the commission’s battle against ‘the gay lifestyle.’”

Following a Board of Commissioners meeting, Byrne refused to say whether “the course would promote the lifestyle that commissioners blasted as contrary to Cobb family values in their Aug. 19, 1993, resolution.” But, he did defend the college’s right to offer the course, called “Modern Gay Literature” – which focused exclusively on the writings of gay authors like Oscar Wilde and James Baldwin.

Commissioners, led by resolution-author Gordon Wysong, “warned of an influx of the lifestyles advocated by the gay community” after a play at Theatre in the Square in the summer of 1993 touched on homosexuality. Criticism of the play is what inspired what would later become known as the anti-gay resolution.

♦♦♦

Workers were reported in the Saturday, Dec. 16, 1995, paper as preparing move the 1874 Vinings Pavilion on Mountain Street to make way for a subdivision. The historic structure was expected to be resettled on a plot on Paces Ferry Road next to the Pace House.

The Vinings Historical Society said that the pavilion had been used “as a retreat by Atlanta’s high society elite during its hey-day.”

During Reconstruction in the 1870s, the Western and Atlantic Railroad, managed by a company owned by former Gov. James Brown, built five open air pavilions throughout Atlanta along train routes to encourage train excursions. The one most Atlantans enjoyed was located in Vinings because of its proximity to several large mineral springs.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Dec. 10
by Damon_Poirier
December 11, 2015 12:38 PM | 541 views | 0 0 comments | 41 41 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Kennesaw Mountain, fires, voting rights, base closings, Bosnia and Johnny Isakson.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Dec. 10, 1915, edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier had a story reporting that W.J. Hames had sold Kennesaw Mountain to William Tate Holland, Virgil McCleskey and C.M. Dobbs. The new owners said they wanted to put in a road to the top of the mountain where they would eventually build a small hotel.

♦♦♦

The Saturday before several fires broke out in Cherokee County. One claimed 162 mules, the barns and 15,000 bushels of corn belonging to Coggins & Bro. stock dealers in Canton and Atlanta. The barn and home of Otis Sherman, located six miles from Canton; seven mules and the barn of Gus Stringer, which was a mile from the Sherman property; and the home of Freeman Bell were also lost.

Another story reported that the Tuesday before a fire hit Ms. Mattie Camp’s home, Tranquilla, located on Kennesaw Avenue in Marietta. The fire broke out in the chimney of a rarely used bedroom on the second floor. The Marietta Fire Department put out the flames, but furniture and wood work in the room were blistered by the fire.

On the same night as the Camp fire, the dormitory at Reinhardt College in Waleska burned at midnight. Mrs. F.C. Fawcett, the wife of a professor, and her five-day-old infant were rescued. There was also a fire at a Ballground warehouse that slightly damaged its cotton stores, which appeared to have been splashed with kerosene.

50 years ago …

About 5,000 Catholics in Cobb, Cherokee and Douglas counties were reported in the Monday, Dec. 5, 1965, Marietta Daily Journal as “awaiting an announcement which will tell them when they can begin eating meat on Fridays.” Pope Paul VI was expected to lift the “age-old rule” the following day.

♦♦♦

Another false alarm bomb threat was reported in the Tuesday, Dec. 7, 1965, paper following the rash of threats against the Cobb County School District, which was first mentioned in Time Capsule on Nov. 12. This particular threat was made against Kennestone Hospital and received by the hospital’s switchboard.

♦♦♦

Also in that paper it was reported that the NAACP argued in the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., on the denial of black voting rights in Georgia. The organization was calling for a cut in the state’s number of Congressmen under “the long-ignored provision of the U.S. Constitution.” The NAACP said enforcement of Section Two of the Fourteenth Amendment would unseat at least two of Georgia’s U.S. Representatives.

♦♦♦

In the Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1965, paper it was reported that Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara’s “big base-closing announcement” was expected to reveal plans for removing nearly two-thirds of the nation’s strategic bomber fleet by 1968-71. Some 345 to 350 of the Strategic Air Command’s 600 B-52 bombers and all of its 80 supersonic B-58 jets were expected to be retired during those years.

A second story stated that Georgia Sen. Richard B. Russell believed McNamara was trying to outguess the Russians on defense. He was quoted as saying that “if [McNamara] is in error, may a benign Providence save these United States.” Sen. Russell also said that the base closing plans came about from a difference of opinion between McNamara and the administration on one hand and the military chiefs of staff and the majority of Congress on the other.

♦♦♦

The results from the cases against all five teenage boys suspended from Cobb County Schools for making bomb threats were reported in the Thursday, Dec. 9, 1965, paper. The cases, mentioned in Time Capsule on Nov. 26, found one boy innocent in connection with a call made to McEachern High School. Another 17-year-old boy entered a guilty plea for that incident.

A 16-year-old boy admitted to actually making the phone call in another threat and was sentenced in Juvenile Court to indefinite probation, given a severe reprimand and ordered to spend four weeks at the Juvenile Home. The remaining two teens were “Not Prossed” by Civil and Criminal Court Solicitor Larry Custer for lack of evidence.

♦♦♦

Also that day, it was reported that a new building was being constructed on the site of the Osborne Junior high School which was destroyed by arson in September and mentioned in the special Time Capsule column titled, The Osborne Junior High School Arson.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, Dec. 5, 1995, paper it was reported that 27 Georgia reservists were among the 3,800 part-time soldiers nationwide ordered by the Pentagon to prepare for duty in a Bosnia peacekeeping operation. Members of the Rome-based 209th Broadcast Public Affairs Detachment were reported as packing their equipment and updating their military records n preparation of deployment to the Balkans.

A second story reported that the first NATO troops had arrived in Sarajevo to set up the peace mission which would bring American soldiers into the conflict. Three camouflaged British C-130 Hercules transport planes were reported as touching down in Sarajevo carrying 28 NATO soldiers composed of French, British and Belgian troops along with the first two Americans.

The multinational “enabling troops” that were moving into Bosnia and Croatia were to set up communications, plan transportation and arrange supplies in the 10 days before the signing of an agreement that would end the 3½ years of war in the former Yugoslvia.

As part of the vanguard, the U.S. was sending 735 soldiers to Bosnia and 730 to Croatia. Defense Secretary William Perry said from Washington that the entire enabling force would arrive in Bosnia or be on its way by the end of the week.

♦♦♦

Current U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Marietta, was reported in the Wednesday, Dec. 6, 1995, paper as kicking off his Senate bid at a $100-per-person event at the Cobb Galleria Centre in the Cumberland area. The campaign kickoff raised approximately $200,000 and drew 1,000 people from across the state.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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